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Looking for suggestions of evergreen plants to fill the gap of the elevated sunroom

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  • Jul 10th, 2020 11:59 am
[OP]
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Jun 7, 2005
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Looking for suggestions of evergreen plants to fill the gap of the elevated sunroom

I will be building a sunroom on an evaluated platform. I was told there will be around 8-10" space ftom the ground. According to building code, there needs to be a gap for air flow, so we can't put bricks or anything to seal it. Thus, I am looking for evergreen plants that can grow fast and grow wide for cosmetic purpose. Thanks for any suggestions.

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..m.mm
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Aug 29, 2019
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Keep in mind that evergreens will decrease airflow and invite critters to maybe take up residence underneath. I suggest a lovely row of mugo pines. They will look lovely mixed with flowers if you want to leave some gaps between the pines for air and to fill out with growth.
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Katedontbreak wrote: Keep in mind that evergreens will decrease airflow and invite critters to maybe take up residence underneath. I suggest a lovely row of mugo pines. They will look lovely mixed with flowers if you want to leave some gaps between the pines for air and to fill out with growth.
Thanks for the suggestion. I have mugo pines in my front yard, they grow very big in diameter though. I think they can grow over 4-5 feet in diameter,
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Aug 29, 2019
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rdx wrote: Thanks for the suggestion. I have mugo pines in my front yard, they grow very big in diameter though. I think they can grow over 4-5 feet in diameter,
Some do, but there are cultivars that will grow half that size or less that grow in a compact rounded form that need no pruning. Garden centers are carrying more stock of smaller cultivars as property sizes keep getting smaller.

http://search.millcreeknursery.ca/11050 ... Mugo_Pine/

There's another one called gnomes that has a mature spread of 2ft.

Both are hardy until zone 2. I like these because they're clean, dense, low maintenance and look great next to other plants and stones so you could fill in any gaps with perennials or annuals to add colour.
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Jun 12, 2008
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Have a look at the different varieties of Yews. They have soft foliage and will grow in sun and shade. We have Hicks Yews in front of our house and love the look of them.
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nielboy wrote: Have a look at the different varieties of Yews. They have soft foliage and will grow in sun and shade. We have Hicks Yews in front of our house and love the look of them.
Thanks. I just googled Hicks Yews, it says they can grow to 10 feet tall. But I guess I can trim them.

Looking for something that is short and can grow fast horizontally. So that I don't need to buy too many of them and trim regularly. Slightly Smiling Face
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rdx wrote: Thanks. I just googled Hicks Yews, it says they can grow to 10 feet tall. But I guess I can trim them.

Looking for something that is short and can grow fast horizontally. So that I don't need to buy too many of them and trim regularly. Slightly Smiling Face
We have a single one in front of our house that we leave alone and it's only 5 feet tall after ten years. We have 5 or 6 against our front stonework and they are the same height but we've been trimming every year. The Hicks seems to grow faster and sturdier when you prune them. They have a spread of about three feet.

We also have a couple of Ward's Yew down one of the sides of the house. They max out at about 30" tall but have a good spread of three feet. Our are about 2ft tall and probably more than 3ft spread after 13 years. You can easily trim down the height and spread if you want. The Yew has to be one of the easiest forgiving shrubs out there.
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Will want to dig that down and make an L shape out of wire to prevent animals nesting.

Junipers are very hardy and grow quickly.
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What about Butterfly Bush ? Looks good with some color. Wonder which local stores are selling them ? They look like something from the wild too. Wonder if I can find them in the hiking trails :)

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rdx wrote: What about Butterfly Bush ? Looks good with some color. Wonder which local stores are selling them ? They look like something from the wild too. Wonder if I can find them in the hiking trails :)

Image
By "evergreen" I thought you meant something that will keep foliage 4 seasons.

Butterfly bush isn't winter hardy, depending on where you live, you may need to prune it down to the ground every spring to remove winter injury.
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Katedontbreak wrote: By "evergreen" I thought you meant something that will keep foliage 4 seasons.

Butterfly bush isn't winter hardy, depending on where you live, you may need to prune it down to the ground every spring to remove winter injury.
Thanks. I just realize that it is not evergreen.
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rdx wrote: Thanks. I just realize that it is not evergreen.
They are not even winter hardy in Ontario and most parts of Canada. Some garden centers will claim they are hardy until zone 4 but that just means it wont die. The foliage will suffer extensive winter injury and many times has to be heavily pruned back down to the ground each spring so you may have no cover at all until it grows back in mid-late summer.
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Like Katedontbreak mentioned, the Butterfly Bush has to be cut down to nothing at the end of the season so you've got no visual barrier during fall, winter and spring. They also start to get top heavy as the summer goes on and in many cases starts to look ratty.

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