Expired Hot Deals

[Lowe's] First Alert Battery Powered Ionization Smoke Alarm, 9-volt, $3.99

  • Last Updated:
  • Jan 31st, 2019 9:13 pm
[OP]
Deal Addict
User avatar
Feb 12, 2002
2984 posts
1418 upvotes
Toronto

[Lowe's] First Alert Battery Powered Ionization Smoke Alarm, 9-volt, $3.99

On sale again for this week at Lowe's. I will be replacing the old, and adding additional ones to my parents house this time (I outfitted my house during the last sale in Nov.)
As basic as they get.
My house already has hard-wired units in the hallways. At this price, I just got one for each bedroom. The included battery alone is worth $2 (Eveready). I was thinking to put one in every room for a while now but would always slip my mind to actually do it.
I mounted them all and tested each one with a burning matchstick and they all work as it should. Extra piece of mind for a few $$ and a few minutes.
The ones I bought in the fall have May 25, 2018 manufacture date.
10-year warranty.
9 replies
Member
Nov 24, 2015
403 posts
233 upvotes
Durham Region
SOB, I just paid $20 for 2 and I thought that was a great deal a couple weeks ago
Deal Guru
Jan 27, 2006
10733 posts
4289 upvotes
Vancouver, BC
While this is a great price which everyone can afford, it should be noted that these are ionization smoke alarms and should be supplemented with a few photoelectric smoke alarms as the two methodologies complement each other.

Here's a quote that basically sums up the difference -
In tests, ionization alarms will typically respond about 30 to 90 seconds faster to “fast-flame” fires than photoelectric smoke alarms. However, in smoldering fires ionization alarms respond an average of 15 to 50 minutes slower than photoelectric alarms. Several studies indicate that they will outright fail to activate up to 20-25% of the time. The vast majority of residential fire fatalities are due to smoke inhalation, not from the actual flames and almost two-thirds of fire fatalities occur at night while we sleep.

In 1995, researchers at Texas A&M University published the results is a 2 1/2 year study on residential fire detection devices. The research showed that ionization alarms failed to provide adequate egress time in smoldering fire scenarios over 55% of the time versus a 4% failure rate with photoelectric alarms. In fast-flame fire scenarios, the study found that ionization alarms failed to provide adequate egress time about 20% of the time versus 4% with photoelectric alarms. The research demonstrates that when all factors are taken into account, i.e.; how often each alarm gets disabled due to nuisance tripping, how they respond across the full spectrum of fires, etc., photoelectric alarms have a clear advantage.
- http://www.propertyevaluation.net/Photo ... ences.html
[OP]
Deal Addict
User avatar
Feb 12, 2002
2984 posts
1418 upvotes
Toronto
craftsman wrote:
Jan 31st, 2019 1:21 pm
While this is a great price which everyone can afford, it should be noted that these are ionization smoke alarms and should be supplemented with a few photoelectric smoke alarms as the two methodologies complement each other.

Here's a quote that basically sums up the difference -

- http://www.propertyevaluation.net/Photo ... ences.html
thanks for the info.
As I mentioned in the op, I used a burning match stick to test these, and indeed it respond within a few seconds to the "live flame".
Out of curiosity, I just tested another of my units with a blown out match stick and let the smoke rise to the detector. And it seemed to respond within the same time frame of a few seconds as well. I know this is not very scientific or relaible test, and a blown out match may just activate the alarm exactly the same way as a flaming match...it just gives me that added confidence in these cheap units.
Now I have to look up what type my existing installed hard wired units are. I put those in 2012 and didn't know/pay attention at the time that there are two types of smoke detectors.
edit: they are Kidde photoelectric units :)
Last edited by Fightguard on Jan 31st, 2019 2:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Deal Guru
Jan 27, 2006
10733 posts
4289 upvotes
Vancouver, BC
Fightguard wrote:
Jan 31st, 2019 1:56 pm
thanks for the info.
As I mentioned in the op, I used a burning match stick to test these, and indeed it respond within a few seconds to the "live flame".
Out of curiosity, I just tested another of my units with a blown out match stick and let the smoke rise to the detector. And it seemed to respond within the same time frame of a few seconds as well. I know this is not very scientific or relaible test, and a blown out match may just activate the alarm exactly the same way as a flaming match...it just gives me that added confidence in these cheap units.
Now I have to look up what type my two hard wired units are. I put those in in 2012 and didn't know/pay attention at the time that there are two types of smoke detectors.
I believe it comes down to how close the smouldering fire is to the detector. A close smouldering fire may put out enough smoke so that the ionization detectors can detect it... however, if the fire is farther away, the smoke may not be dense enough or hot enough to rise up to the detector level for it to sound. After all, in the case of smoke inhalation especially at night, dangerous levels of smoke don't necessarily rise to the height of a smoke detector - ie most beds are under 4 feet in height while smoke detector may be mounted at 7 feet.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jan 16, 2003
1913 posts
486 upvotes
Can anyone recommend a smoke alarm for a kitchen? The one we have currently keeps triggering as soon as we open the oven door. What's strange is there is no visible smoke! It's such a pain in the @#$.
[OP]
Deal Addict
User avatar
Feb 12, 2002
2984 posts
1418 upvotes
Toronto
second2none wrote:
Jan 31st, 2019 2:09 pm
Can anyone recommend a smoke alarm for a kitchen? The one we have currently keeps triggering as soon as we open the oven door. What's strange is there is no visible smoke! It's such a pain in the @#$.
yes, that's a pita but at least you know it will work when it counts.
My hardwired Kidde unit (photoelectric) close to my kitchen does the same thing. I thought it was just grease buildup from not cleaning the oven properly. But after doing a really good oven clean it still happens...figured it's better to "live" with the inconvenience of running to push the silencer button when this happens. Fortunately, we don't really use the oven that much anyway. It's an electric oven btw.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Dec 11, 2004
8651 posts
1681 upvotes
Montreal, QC
second2none wrote:
Jan 31st, 2019 2:09 pm
Can anyone recommend a smoke alarm for a kitchen? The one we have currently keeps triggering as soon as we open the oven door. What's strange is there is no visible smoke! It's such a pain in the @#$.
If you have a builder grade smoke alarm, it is probably ionization, try a photoelectric or 2-in-1 unit (ymmv) instead
Deal Guru
Jan 27, 2006
10733 posts
4289 upvotes
Vancouver, BC
second2none wrote:
Jan 31st, 2019 2:09 pm
Can anyone recommend a smoke alarm for a kitchen? The one we have currently keeps triggering as soon as we open the oven door. What's strange is there is no visible smoke! It's such a pain in the @#$.
Sometimes it's not visible smoke that's the cause but the waves of heat or steam that distorts the visibility of the air that may trigger the detector. You might want to try relocating the smoke detector a few feet further away from the oven and see if that helps.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Dec 11, 2004
8651 posts
1681 upvotes
Montreal, QC
Another pro for photoelectric units..it runs in 2xAa, no pesky 9V battery!

Top