Expired Hot Deals

[Lowe's] Trenz Thin LED POT Light 4- Pack $48 - Ontario Only

  • Last Updated:
  • Mar 10th, 2019 11:24 pm
Deal Addict
Aug 19, 2011
4186 posts
3124 upvotes
Markham
dilmatik wrote: I’ve spoken to a couple pot light installers, and most of them advise against these new “thin” led panels due to light dispersion and replaceabilty being issues.

Any other professional thoughts on this??
I've heard the opposite from a number of electricians who told me almost all new commercial lighting id moving towards non-serviceable trend.

Changing out a faulty 'thin' fixture is barely any more difficult than changing a bulb as long as the driver and LED unit are hooked up with a connector.
Jr. Member
Dec 30, 2008
175 posts
236 upvotes
Mississauga
What size (exact) hole saw do you need for these?
Sr. Member
Feb 28, 2016
969 posts
632 upvotes
I'm aiming for a 4 - 1/4'' hole saw, just waiting on a good deal for one.
Deal Addict
Oct 2, 2013
2324 posts
2199 upvotes
Montreal
Al4222 wrote: You only have to perforate the vapour barrier for the wire from the junction box to the light itself. You'll need to go up in the attic anyways to run wirring to each light. Move the insulation out of the way and replace it while you're up there.

Got it ...thanks Pretty much what I was thinking. Just had a little concern that the junction box or driver will always be in contact
with the vapor barrier. Hopefully it doesn't heat up enough to melt it?
You don't need to do all of this.

Your drywall should be in theory scewed into 3/4 pine that is nailed directly to the joist.

The vapor barrier should in loose enough for the driver to fit in by pushing the vapor barrier up a little bit. This way, you won't damage anything.

The electric wire can also be squeezed between the pine and the vapor barrier so no need to go in te attic.

However, don't use a hole saw to cut the hole. Go slowly with a small drywall knife and don't poncture the vapor barrier. If you use a hole saw, the bit will twist the insulation and it'll make a hole in the vapor barrier (you can easily tape that with tuck tape though).
dmanwin wrote: What size (exact) hole saw do you need for these?
4" 3/16
Member
User avatar
Sep 12, 2004
290 posts
67 upvotes
Toronto
Al4222 wrote: You only have to perforate the vapour barrier for the wire from the junction box to the light itself. You'll need to go up in the attic anyways to run wirring to each light. Move the insulation out of the way and replace it while you're up there.

Got it ...thanks Pretty much what I was thinking. Just had a little concern that the junction box or driver will always be in contact
with the vapor barrier. Hopefully it doesn't heat up enough to melt it?
The vapor barrier extender plastic material is rated to 90 Deg. C.
The fixture runs much below that.
Member
Mar 11, 2004
393 posts
96 upvotes
Ottawa
Which LED Dimmer will work with VeraLite which only operates with Z-Wave programmed Smart devices ?

If not, then any of the newer SmartHubs by Amazon Echo Hub, Samsung SmartHub, etc...

Unfortunately, I didn't see any of the Leviton WiFi based dimmer switches on the list for compatible Dimmers from Trenz: Trenz Compatible Dimmers.
Jr. Member
Dec 30, 2008
175 posts
236 upvotes
Mississauga
deluxster wrote: Which LED Dimmer will work with VeraLite which only operates with Z-Wave programmed Smart devices ?

If not, then any of the newer SmartHubs by Amazon Echo Hub, Samsung SmartHub, etc...

Unfortunately, I didn't see any of the Leviton WiFi based dimmer switches on the list for compatible Dimmers from Trenz: Trenz Compatible Dimmers.
You don't need special dimmers to work with LED's or Trenz... I have dimmers from the 80's that work fine with all my LED's. Just make sure your LED bulbs say dimmable.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jun 21, 2003
3818 posts
1287 upvotes
Stoney Creek, ON
dmanwin wrote: You don't need special dimmers to work with LED's or Trenz... I have dimmers from the 80's that work fine with all my LED's. Just make sure your LED bulbs say dimmable.
That's not exactly true. While you may have dimmers from the 80's that work for you that is the exception not the rule. Using improper dimmers can shorten the life of LED bulbs and increase the chances of flickering or strobing of the light. As well if the dimmer isn't listed as LED compatible you may not be getting the full dimming range of the light itself but just a narrow window of what it can actually do. When switching to LED lighting I would suggest always updating your dimmer to something that is made for LED loads.

EDIT: typo corrected
Member
User avatar
Sep 12, 2004
290 posts
67 upvotes
Toronto
ChicoQuente wrote: That's not exactly true. While you may have dimmers from the 80's that work for you that is the exception not the rule. Using improper dimmers can shorten the life of LED bulbs and increase the chances of flickering or strobing of the light. As well if the dimmer isn't listed as LED compatible you may not be getting the full dimming range of the light itself but just a narrow window of what it can actually do. When switching to LED lighting I would suggest always updating your dimmer to something that is made for LED loads.


EDIT: typo corrected

True, but also rated for not only LED loads, but rated for the driver of the LED load AND rated for the number of fixtures on that particular load. As well, you should not mix different LED types or models on the same load (and expect proper performance ie no flicker, smooth dimming etc).

Look for a printed schedule of approved dimmers with your purchase. If there isn't one, than the manufacturer has not done any testing, so you're on your own.

The Trenz fixtures have undergone full testing and the dimmer approval results are here:
https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/2181/ ... 6980739758
Member
Dec 20, 2010
438 posts
151 upvotes
Toronto
Fritz the Cat wrote: True, but also rated for not only LED loads, but rated for the driver of the LED load AND rated for the number of fixtures on that particular load. As well, you should not mix different LED types or models on the same load (and expect proper performance ie no flicker, smooth dimming etc).

Look for a printed schedule of approved dimmers with your purchase. If there isn't one, than the manufacturer has not done any testing, so you're on your own.

The Trenz fixtures have undergone full testing and the dimmer approval results are here:
https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/2181/ ... 6980739758
Hey Fritz thanks for the info. I have purchased 10 boxes of the 4000k. However I need to know if there are any smart dimmers compatible with these pots. I would like to have integration with SmartThings/Google Home, etc

Thanks in advance.
Gullible? Click here to find out!
Member
User avatar
Sep 12, 2004
290 posts
67 upvotes
Toronto
oo7ibm wrote: Hey Fritz thanks for the info. I have purchased 10 boxes of the 4000k. However I need to know if there are any smart dimmers compatible with these pots. I would like to have integration with SmartThings/Google Home, etc

Thanks in advance.

We have not done testing with smart dimmers as yet.
Our engineers will be working on wifi compatibility. We do not have a completion date as yet. Follow us on Facebook for an announcement of when it will be available.
https://www.facebook.com/litelinecorporation/
Sr. Member
Mar 6, 2005
643 posts
167 upvotes
Hi Everyone,

Hoping to get help with 2x questions?

1) What is the maximum number of these pot-lights per a dedicated 15amp circuit?

2) Is there a good site for number of pot-lights required and the recommended layout?

Thanks T
Member
User avatar
Feb 3, 2009
379 posts
142 upvotes
Fergus, ON
tpirovol wrote: Hi Everyone,

Hoping to get help with 2x questions?

1) What is the maximum number of these pot-lights per a dedicated 15amp circuit?

2) Is there a good site for number of pot-lights required and the recommended layout?

Thanks T
120v x 15a=1800w
1800w x 0.8 (80%)=1440w

1440w / 9w=160 lights

So technically 160 lights if it’s a dedicated circuit and that’s all that’s on it

If it’s a circuit with existing lights and/or plugs
12 minus amount of lights and/or plugs

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