Real Estate

lying on rental application

  • Last Updated:
  • Feb 18th, 2019 12:59 pm
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Jan 9, 2011
5857 posts
5874 upvotes
Vancouver
burnt69 wrote:
Feb 13th, 2019 2:25 am
The no kids allowed 'rule' may very well be illegal and unenforceable.

But you might be evictable on the technicality that you didn't declare the proper number of tenants.
People get married and move in to each others' apartments. I have never heard of a tenant being kicked out because of this. Unless it was in some sort of special designated non-profit housing or something.

I knew a woman who once lived in a nonprofit co-op for single women over 40 only. She said that all of her neighbours were the most miserable people she's ever known. Most were divorced multiple times, bitter, whiny, nosy, etc. She couldn't wait to get out of there.

Another thing you want to watch out for is even if you do bring your kids into an adult-oriented building, an upset landlord can be the least of your concerns. Your neighbours can make life miserable for you and your family.
Deal Addict
Jan 20, 2014
2457 posts
545 upvotes
Ottawa
Jesus Christ just find a building that doesn’t have restrictions for kids.

Just as how you don’t have a preference for basements, allow a landlord to not have a preference for kids. Two at that.

The hypocrisy here is awesome.
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2006
24816 posts
10256 upvotes
AtlsNBP wrote:
Feb 15th, 2019 12:49 pm
Jesus Christ just find a building that doesn’t have restrictions for kids.
I mean... I get why it's a protected class, but I also don't get why it's a protected class.

I for one can't stand kids.
Screaming, crying, destruction, etc.

I'd be totally pissed if I found a building that was kid free and someone moved their crotch fruit in.
I'm quite happy looking for family UNfriendly neighborhoods.
Deal Addict
Nov 2, 2005
3705 posts
1027 upvotes
Ottawa
Don't be a dicksplash. Move on and find somewhere else that's more friendly to your circumstances.
Moderator
User avatar
Jul 5, 2004
23845 posts
3404 upvotes
Who says you're lying? Maybe you planned on moving in without your kids but things changed after you got the apartment.

Do what's best for your kids. You won't be evicted
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Apr 11, 2008
5754 posts
471 upvotes
Kiraly wrote:
Feb 14th, 2019 12:41 pm
People get married and move in to each others' apartments. I have never heard of a tenant being kicked out because of this. Unless it was in some sort of special designated non-profit housing or something.

I knew a woman who once lived in a nonprofit co-op for single women over 40 only. She said that all of her neighbours were the most miserable people she's ever known. Most were divorced multiple times, bitter, whiny, nosy, etc. She couldn't wait to get out of there.

Another thing you want to watch out for is even if you do bring your kids into an adult-oriented building, an upset landlord can be the least of your concerns. Your neighbours can make life miserable for you and your family.
Depends on the "apartment". If it's a room in a house and utilities are covered, the landlord would be extremely pissed off.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Sep 27, 2008
3525 posts
258 upvotes
Adelaide
AtlsNBP wrote:
Feb 15th, 2019 12:49 pm
Jesus Christ just find a building that doesn’t have restrictions for kids.

Just as how you don’t have a preference for basements, allow a landlord to not have a preference for kids. Two at that.

The hypocrisy here is awesome.
No hypocrisy at all. The renter is the customer, and are allowed to have their preferences for businesses/products they want to use. The landlord is providing the product/service and like any other business providing that, they are not allowed to discriminate. Should a landlord be allowed to have a preference of race, sexuality, religion etc their tenants have? Why wouldn't they if they are allowed to have their preferences.
Sr. Member
Jul 11, 2018
699 posts
498 upvotes
Shaner wrote:
Feb 16th, 2019 8:42 am
Who says you're lying? Maybe you planned on moving in without your kids but things changed after you got the apartment.

Do what's best for your kids. You won't be evicted
This right here. If they want to go by technicality, then you go by technicality. Play their game and beat them at it.
Best deals:
Deal Addict
Apr 6, 2008
1798 posts
1122 upvotes
lifelifelife wrote:
Feb 12th, 2019 11:02 pm
I live in Ontario and have a couple of kids.
I have to stay around my area and there are very few apartments available. Basement apartments are out, I am not a snob or anything like that they are just simply a no go for me.
The apartments that are available say they are for adults only, I don't care I have a couple of kids to house.
If I lie on my application and move my kids in what happens?

I called the LTB and they were kind of mum on the issue, I can only guess they want to keep the peace.

So what if I lie on my application and show up with two kids on moving day?
I wouldnt rule basements out. I lived in a basement apartment for 1.5yrs with 3 kids. It had nice big windows and didn't feel like a basement at all. There are lots of nasty ones no doubt, but apartment hunting as a whole is a crap shoot. Do you have friends maybe you could split a house with?
Deal Addict
Jan 29, 2017
1642 posts
1131 upvotes
YOUR RIGHTS AS A TENANT

Discrimination: The Ontario Human Rights Code states that a landlord cannot refuse to rent to you because of your race, religion, sexual orientation, age, gender, gender identity, marital status or if you are a single parent. You also cannot be refused to rent an apartment if you have a disability or are receiving social assistance.

Children: The Ontario Human Rights Code states that a landlord cannot refuse to rent to you if you have children in your care. Similarly, a landlord cannot designate a building as “adults only.”


Privacy: A landlord must give you 24 hours written notice before entering your apartment. They may only enter your dwelling between the hours of 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. This applies even when the tenant and landlord have agreed to repairs. The law allows the landlord to enter the apartment immediately without notice in case of an emergency, such as fire. Month-to-month: Tenants do not have to renew their lease after it expires. In this case, the old lease will still apply but the term will become “month-to-month.” All other conditions/clauses from the old lease will stay the same. Utilities: The landlord cannot shut off your electricity, gas supply or water supply, unless it is necessary to make emergency repairs. This applies even if you have not paid your rent. Personal property: The landlord cannot seize your personal property for any reason, including unpaid rent they may claim they are owed. Locks: The landlord may not lock a tenant out of their dwelling unless they have a written eviction notice certified by the Landlord and Tenant Board and executed by a Sheriff.

If you feel you are being discriminated based on any of the above, call the Human Rights Legal Support Centre at 416-5974900 or the Centre for Equality Rights in Accommodation at 1-800-263-1139 ext. 22.
http://www.elderabuseontario.com/wp-con ... -Guide.pdf

Direct discrimination...but think long and hard if you want to engage in battles. Better be transparent and worst case, document and report. Perhaps contact those numbers for assistance?
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Feb 19, 2010
5941 posts
2647 upvotes
Seems like a bad idea to start off a relationship by lying and pissing people off.

If the building is for adults only, rightly or wrongly, it's probably highly likely that existing tenants live there at least as a result of that designation. Not only do you piss off the landlord but also all your neighbours? Bad idea IMO and bad karma.
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2006
24816 posts
10256 upvotes
TaurusJudge wrote:
Feb 16th, 2019 12:04 pm
This right here. If they want to go by technicality, then you go by technicality. Play their game and beat them at it.
I mean... if you really want to have a terrible relationship with your landlord...
I can still be maliciously compliant within the confines of the law.
Deal Addict
Jul 13, 2012
4796 posts
591 upvotes
Ottawa
death_hawk wrote:
Feb 16th, 2019 2:50 pm
I mean... if you really want to have a terrible relationship with your landlord...
I can still be maliciously compliant within the confines of the law.
Renting property is a lot like having a job; if the only reason you're still there is because there's a law that says they can't get rid of you, it's not going to be a good experience........
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Nov 6, 2010
8471 posts
1010 upvotes
Montreal, QC
I agree with the above 2 posters. Seriously what's so hard about emailing/calling the landlord and just talking to them? Who knows, maybe they'll be willing to let your family rent without a problem if you just ask.
[OP]
Newbie
Feb 11, 2019
6 posts
Thanks for the replies. It is a mixed bag a balance when making a decision like this. The well placed buildings in my area are adult only. Buildings by the tracks and surrounded by concrete on major streets are for kids.
Some buildings it makes sense, super thin floors and all seniors but when they are monopolizing an area it is just wrong. It is frustrating when the first 6 buildings I call say "no kids"

I am in it for the kids guys, it if was easy to go elsewhere I wouldn't be asking.....if they are causing a problem then I don't want to be causing problems.
When it comes to the kids screw people discriminating against them. Don't discriminate if your buildings are next to schools and children parks.

As for being honest in this situation, it doesn't end up working out, ever. If it was a duplex I get it but these are concrete buildings.

Top