Automotive

Maintenance Schedules

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Deal Addict
Nov 28, 2008
1352 posts
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Maintenance Schedules

I am new to the "new" car game, wondering how many of you follow the maintenance schedule to the letter and is it at the dealer or other shop?

Also, how to find out if it's a recommended service by dealer/manufacturer and what's a required service? 2012 Dodge caravan here.

Is it a must to follow the time or KMs are fine? Let's say I am at 50k, will I go for the 50K service or whatever the duration is listed under it?
21 replies
Deal Expert
Mar 25, 2005
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mtl514 wrote: I am new to the "new" car game, wondering how many of you follow the maintenance schedule to the letter and is it at the dealer or other shop?

Also, how to find out if it's a recommended service by dealer/manufacturer and what's a required service? 2012 Dodge caravan here.

Is it a must to follow the time or KMs are fine? Let's say I am at 50k, will I go for the 50K service or whatever the duration is listed under it?
In warranty, follow the manual like the bible, but do the work wherever you want (including in your driveway). Outside of warranty, I do 10k/8mo oil, 2yr brake fluid, annual brake lube and anything else that comes up.
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Jul 24, 2009
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kitchener
Kasakato wrote: In warranty, follow the manual like the bible, but do the work wherever you want (including in your driveway). Outside of warranty, I do 10k/8mo oil, 2yr brake fluid, annual brake lube and anything else that comes up.
+1 to following your owners manual and try to do most of it yourself, if you have a space to work on it.
Also a vehicle "A", which spends most of it's time accelerating from light to light, braking and idling in grid-locked traffic is working harder, than vehicle "B", which is mostly cruising along at highway speeds.
The maintenance schedule requirements will be slightly different for vehicle A than for vehicle B.
Deal Expert
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Feb 26, 2004
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Just follow the service manual supplement that comes with the owners manual until the warranty runs out.
Deal Expert
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May 10, 2005
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The OEM suggested maintenance is a preventative maintenance program. It is a program to perform certain tasks at particular intervals (oil changes, filter changes, fluid changes, lubrication's etc) and preventative maintenance inspections on certain systems (brakes, steering, exhaust, fuel etc). This program is in your owners manual.
The objective, of the OEM, it to ensure that the vehicle and it's systems are within OEM specifications and to spot problems and repair them before they become failures or safety related issues.
A dealer is obligated to ensure that vehicle is within the OEM specifications, he has no choice. His license from the OEM hinges on doing things the OEM way.
An independent shop can do the same preventative maintenance but has the choice of "letting things go" if they feel they do not hinder safety or mechanical failure.
The other option is yours...is to do what you want, when you want and pay for the repairs when things break down or fail, you know, like the Fram filter commercial used to say "Pay me now or pay me more later".
Sr. Member
Apr 18, 2010
578 posts
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As others have said:
1. follow manufacturer's recommendations, not the dealership.
2. follow it religiously if you want to preserve your warranty
3. you can do it yourself or at an indie garage BUT you MUST keep receipts and proof that it's been done.

I hear what Pete_Coach has to say, but if you have a garage you trust I think that is just as good as the dealership except for one issue: if you have developed a relationship with a dealership you might have a better chance of getting something borderline covered under warranty.
Deal Guru
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Nov 30, 2009
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Yup, I just follow the manual and go to the dealership for service work.
[QUOTE]I wish there was a way to know you're in the good old days before you've actually left them.[/QUOTE] ~Andy Bernard, The Office (U.S.)
Member
Feb 10, 2014
355 posts
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Mississauga
I just follow the manual and do it at dealership while under warranty to avoid any hassle. Out of warranty, still follow the schedule but do the work elsewhere.

That's given I'm generally happy with the service my dealership provided. More expensive than Indy shop for sure.
Deal Addict
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Jun 25, 2004
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Pickering, ON
Out of warranty, as mentioned by others, find a decent garage and service based on your own driving habits.

I don't drive much (to and from GO station, a little more on weekends) so I extend my oil changes from the recommended 4 months/5000km to like 6 months, which is often still under 5000km.
Deal Expert
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May 10, 2005
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fredf wrote: As others have said:
1. follow manufacturer's recommendations, not the dealership.
2. follow it religiously if you want to preserve your warranty
3. you can do it yourself or at an indie garage BUT you MUST keep receipts and proof that it's been done.

I hear what Pete_Coach has to say, but if you have a garage you trust I think that is just as good as the dealership except for one issue: if you have developed a relationship with a dealership you might have a better chance of getting something borderline covered under warranty.
I agree. My point was only to differentiate between a dealer and an independent shop. The dealer has to do thing a certain way, a shop does not.
The real key is establishing a relationship with the folks that are going to take care of your vehicle. Too many people assume or accuse a dealer of ripping you off when in fact, the basic maintenance is probably the same cost as an independent. Yes, a dealer will charge more for labour and parts but he has to buy from the OEM and he has a huge overhead to pay for. A small independent shop is just as apt to upsell you as a dealer....except most people already think that he is not near as unscrupulous as a dealer...well folks....think again. :)
Deal Expert
Feb 29, 2008
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My dealer almost killed my family. Screw them.
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Jul 17, 2008
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Kasakato wrote: In warranty, follow the manual like the bible, but do the work wherever you want (including in your driveway).
fredf wrote: 3. you can do it yourself or at an indie garage BUT you MUST keep receipts and proof that it's been done.
For stuff like "inspect", how do you prove you inspected. There is nothing to buy and show receipt. Talking about when you do the work yourself.
Deal Expert
Mar 25, 2005
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Messerschmitt wrote: For stuff like "inspect", how do you prove you inspected. There is nothing to buy and show receipt. Talking about when you do the work yourself.
Look at it, make a note, record it. No different than any other shop inspecting it.
Deal Fanatic
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Nov 6, 2010
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Like others have said, follow the manual in terms of maintenance, things that need to be changed/checked and whatnot. Make sure however to keep up to date as sometimes, OEMs have been known to change the initial schedules released the car (at least it's been my experience with some of the older cars I've owned) so make sure you're on top of that. Also if there's any reported known issues, you can also preemptively ask your mechanic (be it dealer or indy) to check specific areas.

That is of course unless there's failure of something then fix it obviously :razz:
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May 10, 2005
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mr_raider wrote: My dealer almost killed my family. Screw them.
?
You would need some solid proof (as opposed to your opinion) to make an accusation like that.
Having said that, mistakes happen,....everywhere.
Temp. Banned
Jun 18, 2008
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mr_raider wrote: My dealer almost killed my family. Screw them.
You think it was done intentionally? You think this can't happen again if you go to another dealer?

In the future you may want to inspect and double check the work whenever you get your car back from service. As much as I respect my mechanic and his staff, we are dealing with humans and human behavior can lead to mistakes. After a service, I always drive a block away from my shop so as to not insult them, stop and check all the bolts in the tires with my tire iron, recheck air pressures, check the oil level and check for leaks for 1-2 days after the oil change. If there is brake work I apply the brakes hard a few times and listen for any unusual noises. Expecting absolute perfection from people can lead to some serious disappointment
Deal Expert
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Mar 1, 2008
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Just do the major service intervals, even within warranty period. Never had any hassle whatsoever. Of course I do the oil changes as outlined in the manual.
RFD is love. RFD is life.
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May 10, 2005
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mr_raider wrote: wheel-loose-lugs-loosened-spontaneously-1738667/

The service advisor fessed up after a visit, acknowledged there was an issue and apologized profusely.
There were lots of possibilities for a cause that were provided to you in that thread. The service manager apologized just to make you go away.
Like I said, errors happen (if it was an error) and it can happen to any mechanic. Stating that the "dealer" nearly caused the death of your family is a wee bit dramatic and uncalled for.....and then insinuating all dealers are like that...is also dramatic.
Deal Expert
Feb 29, 2008
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Pete_Coach wrote: There were lots of possibilities for a cause that were provided to you in that thread. The service manager apologized just to make you go away.
Like I said, errors happen (if it was an error) and it can happen to any mechanic. Stating that the "dealer" nearly caused the death of your family is a wee bit dramatic and uncalled for.....and then insinuating all dealers are like that...is also dramatic.
I took the car to my trusted INDEPENDANT mechanic. He removed all the wheels and carefully inspected them. There was no rust or signs of damage. His best assessment is that some pinhead forgot to torque the bolts on one wheel. Didn't follow proper shop procedure.

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