• Last Updated:
  • Aug 1st, 2020 10:10 am
[OP]
Newbie
Jan 25, 2018
68 posts
21 upvotes

Mesh Networking

I recently got Bell Fibe Internet 1.5GBS installed in my home. Over the first couple weeks I noticed some extended coverage of wifi, however I have am looking to improve the coverage in my backyard and have been looking at mesh networks.

Based on what I've read so far, my understanding is that I would connect another router to the HomeHub 3000 via an ethernet cord, then install the 'satellites' (I was thinking of having 2, one for the main floor just by my patio door, and one for the basement). I'm looking at getting a satellites that have ethernet ports, so that I can hardwire a tv/gaming console on each floor.

A few questions I have are: what is the difference between dual band, and tri band? And what I've read a few times about wired or wireless backhaul. What is that? While I'm somewhat technically savvy, I don't have much experience with modems/networking. Is this a simple plug and play solution?

I am quite alright with 'overdoing it' on the network side, because I've dealt with close to a decade with Rogers and switching out countless modems and always having 'no internet connection', I'm simply looking for a solution that will provide reliability and coverage to my home.

Any advice or suggestions would be welcome. Thanks.
9 replies
Deal Expert
User avatar
Apr 16, 2001
16192 posts
2854 upvotes
A dual-band router offers two wireless networks: one operating on the 2.4GHz band and the other on 5GHz. The highest-tiered dual-bands support speeds of up to 450Mbps at 2.4GHz and 1300 2400 Gbps at 5GHz. Tri-band routers have three wireless signals: one at 2.4GHz and two on the 5GHz band.

A tri-band router is hosting two separate 5 GHz networks, and it automatically sorts devices into different networks. This offers more speed to share among your devices. Note that it won’t actually speed up a single device — that device is only connected to one of those networks at a time — but it will offer more speed to additional devices you add.

The most important thing, however, is security, not speed. Consumer-grade routers like Netgear, Asus, Linksys, D-Link, TP-Link...are absolute shit for security.

It sounds like you're relatively new to networking, so I'd suggest something simple, like the Google Nest WiFi. Not the fastest, but simple to configure and expand, and I haven't seen any reports of glaring security holes.
Last edited by JAC on Aug 1st, 2020 7:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Automatic down-votes: D-Link, TP-Link, Newegg, Canada Computers, any Chinese-owned cellphone, laptop or IoT device.
Deal Expert
Aug 2, 2004
35797 posts
9141 upvotes
East Gwillimbury
Why would anyone subscribe to Fibe 1.5 Gbps if the switch on the router only gives you 1 Gbps?

You’re paying for speed you can’t use. I guess it would work if you saturate your wired speed and then try and saturate your WiFi

Back on topic

Don’t go mesh, I agree with @JAC, consumer grade stuff is garbage. But every vendor has a commercial grade. Try the TP-Link EAP245 if you’re budget conscious, it is ~90$ on Amazon

There is someone selling one for 80$

tp-link-eap245-v3-access-point-poe-80-firm-2393267/

If you need coverage for the back yard, they have an outdoor rated version. These access points require a wired backhaul.
Deal Addict
Nov 23, 2004
1085 posts
1924 upvotes
Ontario
Gee wrote: You’re paying for speed you can’t use. I guess it would work if you saturate your wired speed and then try and saturate your WiFi
Saturating multiple separate 1gbps ports would do it too without needing to saturate WiFi :)

I could run one heck of a Plex server haha
[OP]
Newbie
Jan 25, 2018
68 posts
21 upvotes
Gee wrote: Why would anyone subscribe to Fibe 1.5 Gbps if the switch on the router only gives you 1 Gbps?

You’re paying for speed you can’t use. I guess it would work if you saturate your wired speed and then try and saturate your WiFi
I was quoted the exact same cost for 1GBPS and 1.5 GBPS.
Deal Expert
Aug 2, 2004
35797 posts
9141 upvotes
East Gwillimbury
mindabsence wrote: Saturating multiple separate 1gbps ports would do it too without needing to saturate WiFi :)
Good luck with that. I doubt there are too many people in the same house hold used wired connections downloading at full speed
Deal Addict
Nov 23, 2004
1085 posts
1924 upvotes
Ontario
Gee wrote: I doubt there are too many people in the same house hold used wired connections downloading at full speed
I couldn't afford the hard drive space to keep up...
Member
Jul 24, 2011
264 posts
71 upvotes
Bradford
Im in the same situation. The tp-link archer ax10 was recommended
Deal Addict
Sep 13, 2011
1320 posts
954 upvotes
Québec
JAC wrote: A dual-band router offers two wireless networks: one operating on the 2.4GHz band and the other on 5GHz. The highest-tiered dual-bands support speeds of up to 450Mbps at 2.4GHz and 1300Gbps at 5GHz. Tri-band routers have three wireless signals: one at 2.4GHz and two on the 5GHz band.

A tri-band router is hosting two separate 5 GHz networks, and it automatically sorts devices into different networks. This offers more speed to share among your devices. Note that it won’t actually speed up a single device — that device is only connected to one of those networks at a time — but it will offer more speed to additional devices you add.

The most important thing, however, is security, not speed. Consumer-grade routers like Netgear, Asus, Linksys, D-Link, TP-Link...are absolute shit for security.

It sounds like you're relatively new to networking, so I'd suggest something simple, like the Google Nest WiFi. Not the fastest, but simple to configure and expand, and I haven't seen any reports of glaring security holes.
802.11ax with 2x2 and 1024QAM modulation reach the speed of 2400 in 80 MHz channel. Not 1300 like your wrote.

@Jury61

Wired backhaul mean that your devices are connected by wired network cable to assure that the maximum bandwith will be available for your devices.

Top

Thread Information

There is currently 1 user viewing this thread. (0 members and 1 guest)