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  • Apr 12th, 2021 1:56 pm
Jr. Member
Mar 23, 2015
138 posts
223 upvotes
Toronto, ON
slantyyz wrote: A bricked device won't start up and usually can't be restored to a bootable state.

In that case, Cricut wouldn't even be able to extort you with a subscription.

Pay to play vs a real brick are not the same.
Bait and switch pay to play schemes are effectively bricking a device, so I’m not sure what distinction you think you’re making. If a guy sells me a car, comes to my house and rips the starter out, then charges me $40 a month just to start my car, my car is non-functional.
Jr. Member
Feb 27, 2007
140 posts
90 upvotes
pizzaclown wrote: Bait and switch pay to play schemes are effectively bricking a device, so I’m not sure what distinction you think you’re making. If a guy sells me a car, comes to my house and rips the starter out, then charges me $40 a month just to start my car, my car is non-functional.
Well if your car can still run with a starter then it's not a brick.

As it relates to tech, the most generally accepted definition of a bricked device is one that can no longer boot or start. If you haven't figured it out yet, a lot of tech peeps get pedantic about these words.

Just because you are unwilling (or too cheap) to pay the fee/tax to use the device doesn't make it a brick. You can still sell it to someone willing to pay the fee.

The only thing you can sell a real bricked device for is spare parts.
Deal Addict
Jul 11, 2008
1582 posts
1655 upvotes
So not bricked, as bricked is dead.

Crippled, yes.

Limited, yes.

Not full featured, yes.

But not bricked. Like it or not that has a definition.

https://www.google.ca/amp/s/www.howtoge ... -mean/amp/

But I think we are all thinking the same thing, unless you are a light user, it might as well be bricked.

Sure, people are using the word incorrectly - but in the end the device is definitely being limited or even arguably its being crippled - although until you reach a 20 upload limit it is fully functional - but regardless this model of introducing paid limitations AFTER you own a device to create a limitation that wasn’t part of our original purchase expectations.

Well, I’m sure we can all agree the correct term is B*llSh*t.
Last edited by MexicanPeso on Apr 11th, 2021 11:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Deal Addict
Apr 28, 2017
1928 posts
2766 upvotes
Guess my Playstation 4 is bricked if I don't sign up for PS+ Face With Tears Of Joy
Deal Fanatic
Mar 5, 2007
7965 posts
8134 upvotes
User381785 wrote: They can't brick your machine. Don't comment if you don't have a clue.
Of course they can. It's a question of WOULD they. Considering their recent actions? That question isn't as clearly answered anymore.

Try being a little less rude next time.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Feb 15, 2005
6321 posts
1906 upvotes
User381785 wrote: And again, that isn't bricking your machine. There's a difference between bricking and being forced to use a subscription model.
They can brick your machine. There's a reddit thread here:
https://www.reddit.com/r/cricut/comment ... they_will/

Bricking a perfectly good machine just contributes to e-waste. Sonos experienced massive blowback when they were going brick their old speakers.

It's also in their IPO filing where they consider the second hand market to be gray market because they are not an authorized distributor. Further in the filing, they state they are protecting their authorized distributors because the top 7 make up 62% of their sales. They state they DON'T want their products discounted nor have online retailers offer free shipping.
In the past, when we have become aware of such products, we have employed technological or legal measures in an attempt to halt their distribution, and we plan to continue to employ such measures in the future.
Last edited by rf134a on Apr 12th, 2021 1:16 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Feb 15, 2005
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pizzaclown wrote: Bait and switch pay to play schemes are effectively bricking a device, so I’m not sure what distinction you think you’re making. If a guy sells me a car, comes to my house and rips the starter out, then charges me $40 a month just to start my car, my car is non-functional.
I would say, it's more of being able to shift from Park to Drive and back a certain number of times. You can't leave the car in park while at work, shopping, etc. Your car will still work and 20 uses/month may even be enough with the current Covid restrictions, but when everyone is vaccinated and back to normal, 20 uses might not even be enough just for commuting purposes.
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Member
Jul 29, 2015
234 posts
222 upvotes
Saskatoon
Guys, this entire semantics argument can be solved by changing your wording to "effectively bricked the device". Please shake hands, thanks.
Jr. Member
User avatar
Nov 17, 2012
182 posts
267 upvotes
Whitby, ON
User381785 wrote: They can't brick your machine. Don't comment if you don't have a clue.
Actually they can and threatened to do so if you tried to sell it when all this nonsense first happened as a way to force people into a paid subscription.

Cricut statement to people threatening to sell off their machines if the subscription service was forced on them was "I would not recommend reselling because the machine will be deactivated and leave the next owner without a machine completely. :(".

Perhaps you should get a clue as that sounds like a bricked, as in unable to use at all useless paper weight, of a machine.
Jr. Member
Aug 25, 2011
177 posts
256 upvotes
BURLINGTON
The semantic arguments about bricking miss the point. A manufacturer shouldn't be allowed to disable a product - hardware or software. Right to repair? Right to use? I hate govt intervention but there should be not just a law but a legal principle. I have stack of apple products that are no longer functional - in practical terms - because of os "updates". A top of the line HP printer managed to disable 3rd party cartridges when the printer "updated" itself. More landfill. I have always wanted one of these Cricut devices - so I appreciate the warnings, not the deal. Thank you.
Deal Addict
Apr 28, 2017
1928 posts
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Nejynoah wrote: Guys, this entire semantics argument can be solved by changing your wording to "effectively bricked the device". Please shake hands, thanks.
Its not about semantics though. In no way shape or form is the product being bricked, even if they implement their subscription model.
Even if they do, you can still upload a set amount of projects per month. And if you're serious about using the machine, you can do the sub and do more. In absolutely no way is Cricut potentially making your device stop working.

And this should be a key point to understand for anyone thinking about this deal and buying this machine.
Member
Feb 22, 2017
419 posts
474 upvotes
Canada
slantyyz wrote: As it relates to tech, the most generally accepted definition of a bricked device is one that can no longer boot or start. If you haven't figured it out yet, a lot of tech peeps get pedantic about these words.
This kind of pedantry is one of the reasons "tech people" are not taken seriously and why junior developers/engineers stay that way, because once you get out of the nerd vacuum, you realize that being able to listen and understand what people are actually saying is a useful skill.

Words having meaning, of course, however, 'bricked' is a colloquialism and language constantly evolves. Bricked can easily change to mean not doing what I purchased it for, and re-selling it doesn't matter, because you can even re-sell something for scrap.

Other words you might 'misuse' according to their 'real' or 'original' definition

- computer
- lag
- GPU
- modem
- router
- monitor

If you are publishing a paper, precision is important, on a forum, get over it.
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User avatar
Feb 15, 2005
6321 posts
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User381785 wrote:
Its not about semantics though. In no way shape or form is the product being bricked, even if they implement their subscription model.
Even if they do, you can still upload a set amount of projects per month. And if you're serious about using the machine, you can do the sub and do more. In absolutely no way is Cricut potentially making your device stop working.

And this should be a key point to understand for anyone thinking about this deal and buying this machine.
Why are you defending Cricut's ability to charge for the machine AND force a subscription? I don't know of any other consumer product that has to be both purchased and subscribed to in order to fully utilize the functions. Cricut has public stated they will make your machine useless if you sell it or buy it second-hand, so why are you saying they won't make the machine stop working? The ending of the "Craft room" made all Mini machines useless despite being completely functional.
https://inspiration.cricut.com/cricut-c ... m-closing/

So, their history has shown they will toss you overboard to enhance their profits. That's quite user hostile.
daveinsurgent wrote: This kind of pedantry is one of the reasons "tech people" are not taken seriously and why junior developers/engineers stay that way, because once you get out of the nerd vacuum, you realize that being able to listen and understand what people are actually saying is a useful skill.
At work, your workstation only has 4 parts: the tower, the monitors, and the keyboard/mouse. Most complaints are that the tower doesn't work properly. You have to adjust your language for the age and skill level of the user so that's the terminology used. Sometimes I feel bad for Help Desk since the calls are so vague.
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Jr. Member
Feb 27, 2007
140 posts
90 upvotes
daveinsurgent wrote: ...re-selling it doesn't matter, because you can even re-sell something for scrap.
I would think the resale price differential between a Cricut that still works (ransom-like subscription or not) and something that is actually bricked probably matters to a lot of people.

I would gladly pay a "brick" price for a pre-owned, working Cricut Maker from someone who isn't willing to pay the subscription or accept the non-subscription limitations. But my guess is those sellers would no longer call their device a "brick", because it no longer serves their interests.

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