Cell Phones

Mobile data IP address

  • Last Updated:
  • Sep 15th, 2021 8:20 pm
[OP]
Jr. Member
Aug 6, 2018
171 posts
52 upvotes

Mobile data IP address

Hi all,
My understanding, mobile data IP address is dynamic as it change from one location to the other (which change cellular tower that we used as well), however, assuming we are using mobile data from 1 location only, the IP address should remain the same (as the IP address is static for the cellular tower that we are using for that location).

I wonder if anyone can confirm whether my understanding is correct.
19 replies
Deal Fanatic
Aug 27, 2004
7437 posts
882 upvotes
Toronto, ON
I don't think IP addresses have anything to do with what tower you're on.

What matters is that the carriers have big CGNAT (carrier-grade NAT) systems that translate whatever IP your device is getting internally to a public IP. How those systems work... I certainly don't know. I think it is certainly possible for the CGNAT system to send different traffic from your device through a different public IP.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Aug 6, 2018
171 posts
52 upvotes
VivienM wrote: I don't think IP addresses have anything to do with what tower you're on.

What matters is that the carriers have big CGNAT (carrier-grade NAT) systems that translate whatever IP your device is getting internally to a public IP. How those systems work... I certainly don't know. I think it is certainly possible for the CGNAT system to send different traffic from your device through a different public IP.
I checked my mobile IP at home and according to https://whatismyipaddress.com/ the IP is likely static IP. I will check the IP when I'm not at home but, I will be very surprise if the IP remain the same.
Deal Fanatic
Aug 27, 2004
7437 posts
882 upvotes
Toronto, ON
slim3605 wrote: I checked my mobile IP at home and according to https://whatismyipaddress.com/ the IP is likely static IP. I will check the IP when I'm not at home but, I will be very surprise if the IP remain the same.
My guess is that they are guessing 'static' vs 'dynamic' IP by looking at reverse DNS (e.g. if the reverse DNS includes 'dynamic', 'pool', or other indicia of a more dynamic IP), which is completely meaningless...

How 'static' actually the IP is has more to do with how their CGNAT works than anything else.
Moderator
Sep 27, 2003
10613 posts
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Newmarket
The default IP config provided by the Canadian carriers is “Private Dynamic”. Not only is the IP, that gets translated from the NAT, not visible from the internet (you can’t ping it), but it will change frequently.
RFD Forums Moderator
Deal Addict
User avatar
Oct 14, 2010
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Barrie ON
slim3605 wrote: My understanding, mobile data IP address is dynamic as it change from one location to the other, however, assuming we are using mobile data from 1 location only, the IP address should remain the same (as the IP address is static for the cellular tower that we are using for that location).
Are you asking what is the IP address of your phone, or what is your phone's address on the Internet?
slim3605 wrote: I checked my mobile IP at home and according to https://whatismyipaddress.com/ the IP is likely static IP.
The address you observed at this web site is your Public IP. It will be an address registered to your phone provider. It is also likely to be static for that tower. Meaning every subscriber accessing that tower will have the same public address.

The IP address of your phone will be a "private address". On my Android phone I use an app called "Network Analyzer" and I can see the private IP of my phone is 10.255.239.xxx, while the web site (whatismyipaddress) reports my public address is 67.69.69.xxx

You can observe the same thing on your home PC. The IP of the PC will be similar to 192.168.0.2, but visiting whatsmyipaddress will show something like 74.12.13.123.

In your home network, your router provides NAT when connecting to the Internet. You should investigate CGNAT as @VivienM has suggested. Especially if you plan on using this IP to gain access to your phone from the Internet, since it introduces a double NAT situation..
Deal Addict
Apr 13, 2005
1379 posts
1375 upvotes
Markham, ON
slim3605 wrote: Hi all,
My understanding, mobile data IP address is dynamic as it change from one location to the other (which change cellular tower that we used as well), however, assuming we are using mobile data from 1 location only, the IP address should remain the same (as the IP address is static for the cellular tower that we are using for that location).

I wonder if anyone can confirm whether my understanding is correct.

The IP doesn't change based on location. It changes based on session.

You can keep a session active when you're driving as the eNodeB (4G LTE) or gNodeB (5G NR) "hands-off" to the following eNodeB/gNodeB ("tower").

Once your session is terminated (your device stops using data -- typically when you connect to WIFI, or turn off phone for most people -- as the device will have background apps running) you may get a new IP address.

The internal IP address will different, but your external IP may not be different. At any given time ~64K UEs will have the same "external" (public) IP address.
FIDO, Freedom Mobile, Koodo, Public Mobile, TELUS customer.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Aug 6, 2018
171 posts
52 upvotes
Rick007 wrote: Are you asking what is the IP address of your phone, or what is your phone's address on the Internet?



The address you observed at this web site is your Public IP. It will be an address registered to your phone provider. It is also likely to be static for that tower. Meaning every subscriber accessing that tower will have the same public address.

The IP address of your phone will be a "private address". On my Android phone I use an app called "Network Analyzer" and I can see the private IP of my phone is 10.255.239.xxx, while the web site (whatismyipaddress) reports my public address is 67.69.69.xxx

You can observe the same thing on your home PC. The IP of the PC will be similar to 192.168.0.2, but visiting whatsmyipaddress will show something like 74.12.13.123.

In your home network, your router provides NAT when connecting to the Internet. You should investigate CGNAT as @VivienM has suggested. Especially if you plan on using this IP to gain access to your phone from the Internet, since it introduces a double NAT situation..
The reason behind the question is this: I need to access certain software from a registered IP address. I already registered my home IP address with my office, but, from time to time, I may need to use my mobile data from a location outside from my home. That said, if I register my mobile IP while I'm at home, would the IP remain the same when I'm moving to a different location when I'm trying to access the software? I'm also assuming, for the purpose of my situation and concern, it is the public IP that I should be concern about not the private IP?
Last edited by slim3605 on Sep 14th, 2021 1:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Aug 6, 2018
171 posts
52 upvotes
mrtin905 wrote: The IP doesn't change based on location. It changes based on session.

You can keep a session active when you're driving as the eNodeB (4G LTE) or gNodeB (5G NR) "hands-off" to the following eNodeB/gNodeB ("tower").

Once your session is terminated (your device stops using data -- typically when you connect to WIFI, or turn off phone for most people -- as the device will have background apps running) you may get a new IP address.

The internal IP address will different, but your external IP may not be different. At any given time ~64K UEs will have the same "external" (public) IP address.
The reason behind the question is this: I need to access certain software from a registered IP address. I already registered my home IP address with my office, but, from time to time, I may need to use my mobile data from a location outside from my home. That said, if I register my mobile IP while I'm at home, would the IP remain the same when I'm moving to a different location when I'm trying to access the software? Based on your explanation, my internal IP will be different for each session but my external IP may not be different. That said, I wonder whether a dynamic internal IP but static external IP will works for me.
Deal Addict
Apr 13, 2005
1379 posts
1375 upvotes
Markham, ON
slim3605 wrote: The reason behind the question is this: I need to access certain software from a registered IP address. I already registered my home IP address with my office, but, from time to time, I may need to use my mobile data from a location outside from my home. That said, if I register my mobile IP while I'm at home, would the IP remain the same when I'm moving to a different location when I'm trying to access the software? Based on your explanation, my internal IP will be different for each session but my external IP may not be different. That said, I wonder whether a dynamic internal IP but static external IP will works for me.
The external IP address will only remain unchanged for a few minutes, few hours. It will most certainly change (it's dynamic). It wont change if you keep the same session (as you're travelling from 1 location to another).

For your scenario, you will need to connect using a VPN. Most smaller VPN providers will have the same static IP address when you're connecting through the same node. I use IronSocket, and the Toronto server has had the same IP address for a couple of years.


Another option is you can always setup a VPN or a Squid proxy at home on a Raspberry PI, and connect it via your your phone. This will ensure your IP is the same as your home IP regardless of where you are in the world. If you're not with FTTH, your upload speeds will be 30Mx (rogers gigabit) so it may be a bottle neck.

Option # 23 is get yourself a $5 digital ocean VPS and setup a VPN or Squid proxy server and connect via this server when at home, or on the go.
FIDO, Freedom Mobile, Koodo, Public Mobile, TELUS customer.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Aug 6, 2018
171 posts
52 upvotes
mrtin905 wrote: The external IP address will only remain unchanged for a few minutes, few hours. It will most certainly change (it's dynamic). It wont change if you keep the same session (as you're travelling from 1 location to another).

For your scenario, you will need to connect using a VPN. Most smaller VPN providers will have the same static IP address when you're connecting through the same node. I use IronSocket, and the Toronto server has had the same IP address for a couple of years.


Another option is you can always setup a VPN or a Squid proxy at home on a Raspberry PI, and connect it via your your phone. This will ensure your IP is the same as your home IP regardless of where you are in the world. If you're not with FTTH, your upload speeds will be 30Mx (rogers gigabit) so it may be a bottle neck.

Option # 23 is get yourself a $5 digital ocean VPS and setup a VPN or Squid proxy server and connect via this server when at home, or on the go.
I'm using PureVPN and need to pay more for dedicated IP. Does smaller VPN usually comes with static IP? I wonder if PureVPN is also static.
Deal Addict
Apr 13, 2005
1379 posts
1375 upvotes
Markham, ON
slim3605 wrote: I'm using PureVPN and need to pay more for dedicated IP. Does smaller VPN usually comes with static IP? I wonder if PureVPN is also static.
It won't be static exclusively for you.
It will be static for all the users using that particular region's server.
FIDO, Freedom Mobile, Koodo, Public Mobile, TELUS customer.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Aug 6, 2018
171 posts
52 upvotes
mrtin905 wrote: It won't be static exclusively for you.
It will be static for all the users using that particular region's server.
I understand, it won't be static exclusively for me, but, do you think that's the case for most VPN or just smaller one? Not sure how do I tell how small is small.

If most VPN are static, that would be the perfect solution for me.

In any case, much thx for the input!!
Deal Addict
Apr 13, 2005
1379 posts
1375 upvotes
Markham, ON
slim3605 wrote: I understand, it won't be static exclusively for me, but, do you think that's the case for most VPN or just smaller one? Not sure how do I tell how small is small.

If most VPN are static, that would be the perfect solution for me.

In any case, much thx for the input!!
I use IronSocket (you can find 50-50% off coupons online for them)
I pay $30usd/yr
Their IP have been fixed for years (for the Toronto servers I've used).
FIDO, Freedom Mobile, Koodo, Public Mobile, TELUS customer.
Deal Addict
Dec 25, 2017
2371 posts
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I'm pretty sure the IP address doesn't change based on location but determined by session. I have been incorrectly assigned a Montreal IP address when I'm from Greater Vancouver and the latency actually reflected that too (contacted Fido to help reset my connection to obtain a geography local IP address). I have also traveled, as a day trip, outside of my own region within BC and the IP address remained a Vancouver, BC IP address for the day.

For Fido/Rogers, they also assign a IPv6 subnet (probably /64?) to the device. The IPv6 address your device uses can be pinged (and you will get replies), the IPv4 address doesn't. If you are using a mobile hotspot, it is possible to use an additional IPv6 address from the subnet your mobile device is assigned, although depending on your device, it doesn't always work properly (for me, USB tethering from my iphone gets my laptop a IPv6 address but wifi tethering does not. Have not checked Bluetooth tether but Bluetooth tethering is slow anyways).
Deal Addict
Jan 5, 2003
4431 posts
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Toronto
slim3605 wrote: I already registered my home IP address with my office, but, from time to time, I may need to use my mobile data from a location outside from my home.
How often do you need to access that software and is it easy to and use (i.e. not a lot of typing, etc. to do your work). If your home IP is registered and works, maybe just consider remote accessing your home PC with your phone and access the software via your home PC that way. The only disadvantage is having to leave your home PC on most of the time and you'll use more mobile data.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Aug 6, 2018
171 posts
52 upvotes
mrtin905 wrote: I use IronSocket (you can find 50-50% off coupons online for them)
I pay $30usd/yr
Their IP have been fixed for years (for the Toronto servers I've used).
I guess I can also check to see PureVPN IP over time and see if its remain the same.

Also, I'm assuming VPN IP is shared IP, is that correct?
Last edited by slim3605 on Sep 15th, 2021 12:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Aug 6, 2018
171 posts
52 upvotes
jm1 wrote: How often do you need to access that software and is it easy to and use (i.e. not a lot of typing, etc. to do your work). If your home IP is registered and works, maybe just consider remote accessing your home PC with your phone and access the software via your home PC that way. The only disadvantage is having to leave your home PC on most of the time and you'll use more mobile data.
Not very often. I also do not have PC, I only have laptop which I would bring with me when I need to work outside my home.

Just for my future reference, how exactly do I accessing home PC remotely with my phone?
Deal Addict
Apr 13, 2005
1379 posts
1375 upvotes
Markham, ON
slim3605 wrote: Not very often. I also do not have PC, I only have laptop which I would bring with me when I need to work outside my home.

Just for my future reference, how exactly do I accessing home PC remotely with my phone?
There are free apps like Zoho assist & Team viewer you can try.
I haven't done this in years so there may be newer better ones that others can suggest.
FIDO, Freedom Mobile, Koodo, Public Mobile, TELUS customer.
Deal Addict
Jan 5, 2003
4431 posts
3926 upvotes
Toronto
slim3605 wrote: Not very often. I also do not have PC, I only have laptop which I would bring with me when I need to work outside my home.

Just for my future reference, how exactly do I accessing home PC remotely with my phone?
Install Chrome Remote Access on your laptop (which is at home with the registered home IP address), then install the Chrome Remote Access app on your phone.

See LINK

Then leave your laptop at home and use your phone to access your laptop and then access the software in question.

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