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Most Versatile Degree?

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  • Jan 27th, 2011 11:56 am
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Sep 26, 2010
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Most Versatile Degree?

What do you guys think is the most versatile degree out there? What degrees will lead to the most job opportunities? Stable employment? Highest salary?
145 replies
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Aug 12, 2010
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peterchaorocks wrote: engineering, it's the most practical degree

In this context 'practical' just means engineering graduates work in engineering whereas an English lit major has a broad set of professions he can go into. That would make anything except engineering versatile.
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Jan 17, 2010
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Niagara Falls
Many people will disagree with me, especially on RFD, but Communications. There is just so much out there for me and there are always job openings related to my experience and degree. I interned at the Canadian Cancer Society and then started out as a reporter, moved to the advertising department, moved on to a magazine in advertising with some marketing in the mix. I just started putting out resumes on Friday for executive positions in the non-profit sector and have two interviews next week.
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May 4, 2010
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Communications degree.
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Jul 8, 2009
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aphid89 wrote: What do you guys think is the most versatile degree out there? What degrees will lead to the most job opportunities? Stable employment? Highest salary?
I'm bias but business degree in finance if you get an A average because it shows your smart and can do any job, engineering also.
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Dec 8, 2007
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Finance.
Engineering.
Mark77 wrote:"All aspiring students should go into the financial services - engineering is, and always has been, a poor choice for our brightest minds ... and TodayHello is my Hero ..."
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Mar 9, 2008
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an arts degree is pretty versatile.

Versatile in the sense that most people who study "arts" in university are never employed in their field. Example - Mcdonalds, starbucks, stripping, etc.
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mastercool wrote: an arts degree is pretty versatile.

Versatile in the sense that most people who study "arts" in university are never employed in their field. Example - Mcdonalds, starbucks, stripping, etc.


Why do people so often piss all over arts degrees?

Is it because of their lack of utility when it comes to finding employment, or the kinds of people that take these arts programs in university, or because they were getting all the mad crazy girls and having a total blast living their lives while other were churning away papers in a basement only to later realize upon graduation they have slim job prospects and the social lurkers then rise to take on better paying jobs in some sort of ironic twist where people now laugh at the art majors ignorant folly ..... ???

Just throwing it out there
Mark77 wrote:"All aspiring students should go into the financial services - engineering is, and always has been, a poor choice for our brightest minds ... and TodayHello is my Hero ..."
Hydropwnics wrote:"TodayHello is a certified hustler and original gangster."
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Dec 20, 2010
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[IMG]http://i2.cdn.turner.com/money/2009/07/ ... egrees.gif[/IMG]

Being in the electronics engineering field myself, I can confirm that the prospects of an engineering students can be very diverse, engaging, flexible, can land you in an interesting field, and pretty much self-sufficient. I believe there are only another 2-3 fields that are as versatile. It's super pleasurable to be in a field that provokes you to expand your horizons and look into various other fields such as philosophy, belief systems, life sciences, anything that can be described by mathematical dependencies, and so on. Long story short, the self-sufficiency is great and the job opportunities are very various.

There's a thing claiming system engineers have the most preferred job in the world, I myself didn't investigate further but I believe it's worth considering. [link]
Sr. Member
Aug 12, 2010
664 posts
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Toronto
TodayHello wrote: Why do people so often piss all over arts degrees?

Is it because of their lack of utility when it comes to finding employment, or the kinds of people that take these arts programs in university, or because they were getting all the mad crazy girls and having a total blast living their lives while other were churning away papers in a basement only to later realize upon graduation they have slim job prospects and the social lurkers then rise to take on better paying jobs in some sort of ironic twist where people now laugh at the art majors ignorant folly ..... ???

Just throwing it out there

Half of it is jealousy. Arts majors might end up being their bosses (though these days that is gone; more likely a business major).

Half of it is what I call the island analogy. Imagine if you lived on an island your entire life, and spent the whole time memorizing every little bit of it. You know everything about the island, every plant, every animal and consider yourself an expert or perhaps a genius. Then someone new comes along and tells you what you know is wrong or worse, incomplete. Without even realizing he's out of his depth, the islander thinks the newcomer rude or an idiot and talks out of turn or debates without knowing the basics. This is the way it is with many arts majors. Just think; to become an arts major you don't even have to know Newtonian mechanics and drop out of science in grade ten. Your view of the universe, of anything even remotely technical, is extremely limited. So unless the arts major defers to others or is humble, every time he opens his mouth about anything remotely related to science, it is an affront. Maybe a better analogy is how pissed off family doctors get when patients who found something on Google try to tell them what medicine to prescribe; unless you have had training in a field, any field, you are likely to piss people off in that field because you don't even know how little you know.
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databaseoracle wrote: Half of it is jealousy. Arts majors might end up being their bosses (though these days that is gone; more likely a business major).

Half of it is what I call the island analogy. Imagine if you lived on an island your entire life, and spent the whole time memorizing every little bit of it. You know everything about the island, every plant, every animal and consider yourself an expert or perhaps a genius. Then someone new comes along and tells you what you know is wrong or worse, incomplete. Without even realizing he's out of his depth, the islander thinks the newcomer rude or an idiot and talks out of turn or debates without knowing the basics. This is the way it is with many arts majors. Just think; to become an arts major you don't even have to know Newtonian mechanics and drop out of science in grade ten. Your view of the universe, of anything even remotely technical, is extremely limited. So unless the arts major defers to others or is humble, every time he opens his mouth about anything remotely related to science, it is an affront. Maybe a better analogy is how pissed off family doctors get when patients who found something on Google try to tell them what medicine to prescribe; unless you have had training in a field, any field, you are likely to piss people off in that field because you don't even know how little you know.

Gotta agree with this.

TH, Arts majors get more girls? Dude, most arts majors are girls. Women are generally more gifted in languages, and while there are exceptions (gifted musicians for example) your average male arts major is trying to coast through their degree.

Now I'm not saying that you need to have a M.Sc. in order to be someone's boss, but if you lack understanding of the principles of chemistry, physics, biology, and computer science, then you're not really fit to do much outside of HR. If you're making $100,000yr and tell me that the sky is blue because it reflects light off the ocean, then I'm going to seriously wonder how you remember to breathe while standing.
In a perfect system, corporations would fear the government and the government would fear the people. - David Wong

Check out caRpetbomBer's picks in this thread.
Sr. Member
Sep 15, 2009
586 posts
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Syne wrote: Gotta agree with this.

TH, Arts majors get more girls? Dude, most arts majors are girls. Women are generally more gifted in languages, and while there are exceptions (gifted musicians for example) your average male arts major is trying to coast through their degree.

Now I'm not saying that you need to have a M.Sc. in order to be someone's boss, but if you lack understanding of the principles of chemistry, physics, biology, and computer science, then you're not really fit to do much outside of HR. If you're making $100,000yr and tell me that the sky is blue because it reflects light off the ocean, then I'm going to seriously wonder how you remember to breathe while standing.

Wow, that's quite a rant. Sorry to break this to you, but knowing about science is only important to people who think knowing about science is important. Most people don't need to know much beyond the very basics.

Your claim that "if you lack understanding of the principles of chemistry, physics, biology, and computer science, then you're not really fit to do much outside of HR" demonstrates that you know very little about the world outside of your science background point of view. The fact is, an in-depth knowledge of science is required in far fewer jobs than you seem to imagine.
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Aug 12, 2010
664 posts
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Toronto
Syne wrote: Gotta agree with this.

TH, Arts majors get more girls? Dude, most arts majors are girls. Women are generally more gifted in languages, and while there are exceptions (gifted musicians for example) your average male arts major is trying to coast through their degree.

Now I'm not saying that you need to have a M.Sc. in order to be someone's boss, but if you lack understanding of the principles of chemistry, physics, biology, and computer science, then you're not really fit to do much outside of HR. If you're making $100,000yr and tell me that the sky is blue because it reflects light off the ocean, then I'm going to seriously wonder how you remember to breathe while standing.

I make no value judgements on the worth of an arts degree, only point out why engineers and science majors get angry at arts majors. For example I happen to think that patients SHOULD be looking on the Internet to learn about their health and most doctors are *******s. I also think that most science majors are just as lazy as arts majors.

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