Home & Garden

My basement in progress..

  • Last Updated:
  • Apr 5th, 2012 6:48 am
Tags:
None
[OP]
Deal Fanatic
Jan 16, 2003
6366 posts
196 upvotes

My basement in progress..

As requested in another thread, here's the status of my basement:

Step 1: Remove the builder's crap.
Image

Step 2:
I had a 10% off coupon and wanted to maximize it so I ordered everything at once and paid a bit more to have home depot deliver it in the basement. The extra fee was 1$ per sheet of drywall or OSB. 70 sheets of drywall, 33 sheets of 3/4" OSB and 2 1/2 hours later, the 5 guys from home depot were done! They were 3 during the first 90 minutes, two other ones showed up after.
Image

Image

I still have a lot of wood in the garage however.. :shock:
Image


Step 3:
Do the subfloor. 1" rigid foam (codebord), ship lap seams were glued with PL300 and then tuck-taped. I left a gap of ~1/4 - 3/4" all around the foundation wall. I then used tapcon knockoffs ("Powers" something, from Ottawa Fasteners, 15$ for a box of 100, 3/16 x 2 3/4 and one drill bit included per box. Philips head. They were much cheaper than the home depot and I only snapped one (while adjusting torque). I've used close to 500 so far (~15 per sheet). My makita hammer drill went through concrete like butter (well.. close to). ~10 seconds per hole. No issue with the philips heads either.
Image

Step 4:
Spray foam perimeter wall, teleposts and pipes and enjoy the finished subfloor. I used great stuff with the 35$ foam gun from home depot (great stuff pro 13).
Image
Image
Image

Lessons learned:
- A good caulking gun is a must. I'll never buy a cheapie again. I picked up a 13" (?) from home depot (~13$) and it's awesome. I then bought a similar 9$ for ~10$, well worth it. My cheap one will end up in the trash. This one offers so much more control.

- A good hammer drill is well worth it!

- The foam gun is soooooooo much better than the crappy plastic pipe that comes with the regular great stuff cans. Well worth the price because it offers a lot of control.

- Skip the sissy stuff. It takes forever with a hammer and tiny crowbar to get the T&G of the OSB to fit well and tight especially near the wall. I used a sledge hammer and a 5' pry bar (well worth the 15$ when on sale at canadian tire!). :thumb:
Image


That's it for now.. I'll hopefully start framing the walls this week.
127 replies
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Jun 8, 2003
8447 posts
785 upvotes
Scarborough
I really like the way you do the sub-flooring.
Banned
May 29, 2005
2255 posts
41 upvotes
Wow.....good on ya mate :!: I enjoyed that well put together progress report, please continue to keep us updated in the same fashion, donn't hold anything back or assume that people know what you are talking about, just break it down to the nitty gritty.

I guess you don't have a before pictures handy? It might be worth adding those those along with afters.

Wicked stuff.....a pint of guiness is on it's way to ya :D
*We are all immigrants here, unless you're Aboriginal of course .....Check your ancestors passport for place of birth if you don't believe me*
[OP]
Deal Fanatic
Jan 16, 2003
6366 posts
196 upvotes
glaswegian wrote: I guess you don't have a before pictures handy? It might be worth adding those those along with afters.
The only "before" picture is the 1st one.. just picture that yellow insulation all around and the bare concrete floor.


Once framing and electrical is done, I'll have everything spray foamed (after removing the batt insulation in rim joist area of course..). I can't wait to have that done so that the entire house feels warmer.
Deal Fanatic
Nov 18, 2005
5056 posts
1437 upvotes
Kitchener
lots of jackposts. I'm doing a similar basement now and the homeowner had their builder run 2 steel beams across the width of the room instead of 1 down the middle. I think it was a $500 upgrade option... they don't have any jackposts at all now. The foam on the floor with OSB or plywood is definitely the way to go these days
[OP]
Deal Fanatic
Jan 16, 2003
6366 posts
196 upvotes
Drthorne wrote: lots of jackposts. I'm doing a similar basement now and the homeowner had their builder run 2 steel beams across the width of the room instead of 1 down the middle. I think it was a $500 upgrade option... they don't have any jackposts at all now. The foam on the floor with OSB or plywood is definitely the way to go these days
Yeah, the jackposts are a PITA but they will all (except for 1) fit in walls so it doesn't really matter. None would have been better however..
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Jul 18, 2003
6627 posts
699 upvotes
Etobicoke
What made you decide to go with rigid foam board + OSB instead of Barricade or DriCore modular sub floors?

Also, with rigid foam + OSB, what about drainage? Did you simply cover it or did you cut ditches for the water to flow?
[OP]
Deal Fanatic
Jan 16, 2003
6366 posts
196 upvotes
dricore = you have air circulation and need to cut a vent every 8'. It apparently ends up smelling quite stale after a while so you need to put fans.

I made the assumption that my basement will stay dry (good grading, soil isn't clay and I've got "tuff-n-dri" applied to the outside of my foundation) so there shouldn't be any water circulating. Dri-core is only good if you have a leaky basement and even then, you should fix the problem before finishing the basement.

I wanted comfort and a warm floor without breaking the bank so rigid foam was the most logical choice. I'll add laminate over it at some point.
Deal Fanatic
Nov 18, 2005
5056 posts
1437 upvotes
Kitchener
if you have "water flowing", then you'd have to rip up the floor and let everything dry no matter what you put down
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Oct 15, 2007
5275 posts
2714 upvotes
GOood Job :)

the only thing i would have done different is, I would have used Dri Core
Deal Addict
Apr 11, 2003
1445 posts
6 upvotes
That's looks really well done. I'm still contemplating on whether to use a membrane (i.e. Delta) or foam, or both, for the subfloor. Did you consider plywood instead of OSB, or is it not worth it?

What are you going to do around the furnace area? Just leave it exposed? What did you do to level the floor?
Banned
May 29, 2005
2255 posts
41 upvotes
A lot of interesting question there, looking forward to the answers myself
*We are all immigrants here, unless you're Aboriginal of course .....Check your ancestors passport for place of birth if you don't believe me*
Member
Mar 22, 2006
270 posts
40 upvotes
Dri Core is the way to go. I have seen many applications of the rigid poly building up condensation behind (even in the driest of applications). this causes a mould factory. Try to keep the water away from your house.
Deal Fanatic
Nov 18, 2005
5056 posts
1437 upvotes
Kitchener
are you just doing the walls with drywall and suspended ceiling? that's a lot of drywall. get a drywall lifter at Home Depot or Rona, It'll make drywalling so much easier. They are about $25.

Image

I also find the Dust control plaster works great, keeps the dust down when sanding. I usually use the cheaper regular mud for taping and the first coat, then dust control for the 2nd coat
[OP]
Deal Fanatic
Jan 16, 2003
6366 posts
196 upvotes
mallik wrote: That's looks really well done. I'm still contemplating on whether to use a membrane (i.e. Delta) or foam, or both, for the subfloor. Did you consider plywood instead of OSB, or is it not worth it?

What are you going to do around the furnace area? Just leave it exposed? What did you do to level the floor?
3/4 OSB = ~11$ / sheet, 5/8 plywood was ~24$ I think (can't remember exactly). I've got 33 sheets so that's 400$ extra right there. I don't see what plywood would offer more. Water resistance? I think that it's a moot point. If a pipe bursts, the whole subfloor has to come out anyways. Both offer pretty much the same rigidity because the OSB is slightly thicker

For the furnace area, I've left a "cutout" in the subfloor around furnance + water tank. I've put a silicone bead at the foam / concrete edge so water doesn't get under the foam if something minor happens.
speedysa wrote: Dri Core is the way to go. I have seen many applications of the rigid poly building up condensation behind (even in the driest of applications). this causes a mould factory. Try to keep the water away from your house.
Hmm.. That isn't the case based on my research and everything I've read on the mikeholmesfanforum and other sources.
- Each sheet of OSB has ~15 concrete screws that squeeze the foam to the concrete so there should be a minimum of areas where potential condensation could occur.
- The foam is 1" thick so it doesn't act as vapor barrier (1.5" would be vapor barrier)
- What would the mold feed on? No wood. No fiberglass. Nothing. Just concrete on one side, extruded foam on the other.


As for dricore:
-I don't like the need for vents every ~8' at the perimeter,
- you have to shim it properly otherwise it "clicks" when you walk on it,
- It has a lower R value (R3.5 ?)
- the stale air will end up smelling
Drthorne wrote: are you just doing the walls with drywall and suspended ceiling? that's a lot of drywall. get a drywall lifter at Home Depot or Rona, It'll make drywalling so much easier. They are about $25.

I also find the Dust control plaster works great, keeps the dust down when sanding. I usually use the cheaper regular mud for taping and the first coat, then dust control for the 2nd coat
Yes. Drywall on walls and a suspended ceiling for the convenience. I will have the mudding and taping done by someone else because I suck at it. I've got a guy that can do it for "no more than 500$ for sure" he said and it would then be ready to prime. I'd have to supply the mud though. 4x9 or 4 1/2 x 8 sheets wouldn't fit through the stairs so I needed 4x8 and my ceiling is 9' high so lots of mudding to be done.

What's that drywall lifter thing? You slide your feet in and it's to lift the sheet slightly and makes it easier to position next to the other?
Deal Fanatic
Nov 18, 2005
5056 posts
1437 upvotes
Kitchener
mart242 wrote: What's that drywall lifter thing? You slide your feet in and it's to lift the sheet slightly and makes it easier to position next to the other?
yes, makes it easy to lift the drywall with your foot. keep the bottom of the drywall 1/4" to 1/2" off the floor in case there's a water spill or something. You're going to have a drywall butt joint all the way along the top or bottom of the room? Hope you're plaster guy is good. If a wall is under 8feet long, put the sheets sideways and a 1foot strip of drywall between... it's way easier to plaster
Deal Expert
Oct 20, 2001
18709 posts
1306 upvotes
Sauga
mart242 wrote: 4x9 or 4 1/2 x 8 sheets wouldn't fit through the stairs so I needed 4x8 and my ceiling is 9' high so lots of mudding to be done.
I couldn't even fit 4x8's down my stairs. So we went through the family room floor instead....pulled the carpet, cut a hole, got everything down, then fixed it up again. Sanding would've been even more of a pain if our drywall sheets were smaller, so it was well worth it.
[OP]
Deal Fanatic
Jan 16, 2003
6366 posts
196 upvotes
Drthorne wrote: yes, makes it easy to lift the drywall with your foot. keep the bottom of the drywall 1/4" to 1/2" off the floor in case there's a water spill or something. You're going to have a drywall butt joint all the way along the top or bottom of the room? Hope you're plaster guy is good. If a wall is under 8feet long, put the sheets sideways and a 1foot strip of drywall between... it's way easier to plaster
The guy does that for a living so it should be fine. I'm also tempted to put the suspended ceiling at 8' high to hide that. Even if I put the ceiling at 8', I need to cover the 9' with drywall because of the spray foam (ie: highly flammable)
Rehan wrote: I couldn't even fit 4x8's down my stairs. So we went through the family room floor instead....pulled the carpet, cut a hole, got everything down, then fixed it up again. Sanding would've been even more of a pain if our drywall sheets were smaller, so it was well worth it.
I've got hardwood so it wouldn't be as easy.. ;) The 4x8 were close though, I had to remove the door and railing.

Top

Thread Information

There is currently 1 user viewing this thread. (0 members and 1 guest)