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My dog is becoming aggressive

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  • Dec 29th, 2021 9:05 pm
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[OP]
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Jan 26, 2008
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Scarborough

My dog is becoming aggressive

So I have a dog (husky)(1-2 year old). He is becoming aggressive towards strangers who walk by (no barking, he tries to lunge towards the person) when I walk him like he would pull me towards the stranger which scares him or her.

I will start using this (pictured below) collar from now on which has prongs pointing inwards so it hurts him when he pulls. He does not act like this at the dog park towards strangers. Any suggestions? Put a muzzle on him as an indicator that he is no friendly dog? Zap him every time he acts hostilely against random people? Or have him trained by a pro? What can I do as a responsible dog owner?

He used to do this once in a blue moon which is fine. But now it's like 50-50. Or at least I feel that way. He used to behave most of the time and not do anything. But now I do not feel that way anymore.
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23 replies
Deal Fanatic
May 14, 2009
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Is he on leash when he lunges at strangers who walk by and off leash when he’s around strangers at the dog park? I’m no expert but it sounds like he may have leash reactivity.
[OP]
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Jan 26, 2008
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Scarborough
amz155 wrote: Is he on leash when he lunges at strangers who walk by and off leash when he’s around strangers at the dog park? I’m no expert but it sounds like he may have leash reactivity.
Yes. So I just looked this up and this may be the case. He does not lunge at strangers when off leash at the dog park.
[OP]
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Jan 26, 2008
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So the responsible thing to do is not allowing my dog to get triggered and keep him under threshold as it is unfair and unsafe to the public at large. I will avoid places that may trigger my dog until his behavior is corrected. So my dog is reactive on leash when he sees squirrels, cats, cyclists, and strangers some of the time. He does not have a problem with other dogs when on a leash.

I'm going to purchase a head collar. It reduces excessive leash pulling and other unwanted behaviors like lunging and jumping.
Deal Fanatic
May 14, 2009
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It takes time and patience and consistency, but you can certainly succeed at helping your dog become less reactive. I use a clicker and treats to train my dogs to not be reactive on leash. Basically you click to mark the behaviour you want and then reward with a treat. You can start with your dog far away from where the ‘trigger’ is but where your dog can still just see it. Then mark by clicking when he isn’t reacting to the trigger. Slowly move closer to the trigger and mark non-reactivity that occurs after the dog notices the trigger, even if it’s just a second or two before the dog loses it, try and mark the exact moment the dog doesn’t react to the trigger. Over time, you can build up the duration you expect the dog to be non reactive for at a certain distance (e.g. build from two seconds to thirty) and/or reduce the distance to the trigger and mark when the dog doesn’t react as you inch closer to the trigger. Rinse, repeat and so on.
Deal Fanatic
Dec 31, 2007
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take him to a canine training facility and work on his behaviour with professionals.
"Buy now, think later. This is the way."
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Mar 7, 2007
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amz155 wrote: It takes time and patience and consistency, but you can certainly succeed at helping your dog become less reactive. I use a clicker and treats to train my dogs to not be reactive on leash. Basically you click to mark the behaviour you want and then reward with a treat. You can start with your dog far away from where the ‘trigger’ is but where your dog can still just see it. Then mark by clicking when he isn’t reacting to the trigger. Slowly move closer to the trigger and mark non-reactivity that occurs after the dog notices the trigger, even if it’s just a second or two before the dog loses it, try and mark the exact moment the dog doesn’t react to the trigger. Over time, you can build up the duration you expect the dog to be non reactive for at a certain distance (e.g. build from two seconds to thirty) and/or reduce the distance to the trigger and mark when the dog doesn’t react as you inch closer to the trigger. Rinse, repeat and so on.
+1

It takes a huge amount of time and patience to have a dog.

IMHO huskies require even more! Just part of their personality.

Good luck OP!
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Deal Addict
Jan 28, 2014
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Toronto
OP - Please do not use the prong collar. You can buy head collars etc. that will help. Your pup is in the terrible 2s age. Is your husky at all aggressive towards you or your family? Is he aggressive towards all strangers etc. or just some?

Is your pup your first dog? The husky breed is generally recommended for experienced dog owners.

We had a husky type of dog for 17 years (a standard American Eskimo). During his early years he had similar issues but a cookie turned him into a love bug no matter who gave it to him - and the cookie always came from my stash. He did love food and immediately his stance would change. But he was always a barker.

He had private and group lessons and of course was the star of each. He was a very smart dog. I did check the site of the at home trainer we used who was excellent but she now operates only from Orillia and the surrounding area. The other dog trainer you might look into who is based in Toronto is "Deena Speaks Dog". Look at her website. It is not inexpensive for private lessons at your house but it can help and it would be worth checking her out. She also offers classes (or did - I am not sure these days of Covid - actually the same with private lessons). Note her methods are considerably different than our preferred trainer but on the other hand other people (including one of our vets) love and use her.

In my experience of the breed, they are people loving dogs as far as their immediate family go but not as good with some strangers. Or if they perceive a threat to you or someone else they love. Funnily enough our guy would be very good with anyone who had a disability. He did not go to off leash parks nor did we use an extend-a-leash (they are not recommended).

But I will stress again, please do not use a prong collar. Re the collars that spray the dog if he barks well a very smart dog is able to count and will bark the number of sprays just to get it over with - or the spray won't bother him (think our dog).

On the other hand you have to prepare yourself for the fact that your pup might be one who will eventually bite everyone. This does happen.

I wish you the best of luck. I was grateful just to have the barking (common) rather than having to constantly cross the street.
Sr. Member
Sep 15, 2017
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Blanche123 wrote: OP - Please do not use the prong collar.
But I will stress again, please do not use a prong collar.

???? Prong collars when used properly and for the right reasons are great tools.
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Nov 24, 2012
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Absolutely agree. Total misconception with people thinking they’re torturous. I’ve trained MANY dogs. Some were easy with no prong required. Others were very difficult and had to be trained with a prong, to not only protect me, but themselves.

oilerfan89 wrote: ???? Prong collars when used properly and for the right reasons are great tools.
Deal Fanatic
Feb 4, 2010
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Instead of using inhumane methods I think you're better off hiring a professional who knows what they're doing to train your dog.

The first step in being a responsible dog owner is researching what it means to be a dog owner and what type of breed new owners should start off with. So many people don't do this and then run into this kind of situation and often end up getting rid of the dog, according to the Humane Society
Newbie
Nov 2, 2012
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TORONTO
The problem with prong collars is that they're supposed to be a tool to use in conjunction with behavioural training, while people use them exclusively for behavioural training, which can fix the *symptom* but not the underlying problem.

A good behavioural specialist will help shape the dogs behaviour to help deal with their aggression whether the collar is on or not.
Sr. Member
Sep 15, 2017
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hierophant wrote: Instead of using inhumane methods I think you're better off hiring a professional who knows what they're doing to train your dog.

The first step in being a responsible dog owner is researching what it means to be a dog owner and what type of breed new owners should start off with. So many people don't do this and then run into this kind of situation and often end up getting rid of the dog, according to the Humane Society
Inhumane? Do tell.
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Nov 15, 2004
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I've been working with my reactive dog and honestly, it's just a lot of repetition. Find your dog's red zone (i.e. the distance at which it will lunge) and stay further when you see people approaching. Get your dog to sit while they pass and keep its attention on you with treats or a toy. Keep working at it and hopefully you'll see better behaviour down the line. I've been working with my dog for a few months and I know that she can hold it together if other dogs are across the street. High value treats have also helped with this exercise!
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Jun 12, 2008
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A strong dog won't even notice the prong collar. They almost build up a tolerance of the prongs in their neck. The better collar that doesn't have the stigma is the Halti collar. They are very effective and recommended by dog trainers. They aren't like a muzzle so the dog still has full use of its mouth.

Deal Addict
Oct 21, 2006
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Huskies are a$$hole dogs and known to have these types of issues
Prong collars don't work on huskies
Consider dropping him off at a shelter for adoption. Someone else might be able to deal with the problem dog
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Jul 31, 2017
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nielboy wrote: A strong dog won't even notice the prong collar. They almost build up a tolerance of the prongs in their neck. The better collar that doesn't have the stigma is the Halti collar. They are very effective and recommended by dog trainers. They aren't like a muzzle so the dog still has full use of its mouth.


Ha!

The dog they pass at 2:14 is a Welsh Terrier like mine.
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Jul 31, 2017
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hierophant wrote: Instead of using inhumane methods I think you're better off hiring a professional who knows what they're doing to train your dog.

Used properly, prong collars are excellent tools. The fact that you call them inhumane means you have little idea what you are talking about. They apply pressure, but do not hurt. Many reputable trainers recommend them.
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Feb 4, 2010
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SkynyrdsInyrds wrote: Used properly, prong collars are excellent tools. The fact that you call them inhumane means you have little idea what you are talking about. They apply pressure, but do not hurt. Many reputable trainers recommend them.
If the collar didn't hurt then why not use a regular collar? Why don't you put the collar on and have someone yank it and then tells if hurts or not.

Everything you just said is propaganda by companies who make the collar and debunked by by actual credible trainers. I trust their information over your opinions. Humans have a habit of justifying abhorrent behaviour if it suits their needs.

https://www.sfspca.org/behavior-training/prong/myths/

https://www.dogboys.com/the-top-5-reaso ... g-collars/

https://www.humanesociety.org/resources/dog-collars

https://wagwalking.com/wellness/are-pro ... for-my-dog
Sr. Member
Jul 31, 2017
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hierophant wrote: If the collar didn't hurt then why not use a regular collar?


The collar applies pressure without inflicting pain, as a mother dog's teeth do.

Just stop talking about something you know nothing about because all you are doing is demonstrating your ignorance.


Why don't you put the collar on and have someone yank it and then tells if hurts or not.
I have.

I've put it on my arm and pulled as tightly as I could. Not only did it not hurt, it didn't even leave a mark.

Everything you just said is propaganda by companies who make the collar and debunked by by actual credible trainers.

Funniest, and least informed, thing I have read all day.

I first bought one because it was recommended by a trainer.

https://www.canr.msu.edu/news/prong_col ... e_a_danger

https://www.caninejournal.com/pinch-collar/

https://highlandcanine.com/prong-collar ... ers-oh-my/

https://www.breakthroughk9training.com/ ... g-collars/

https://www.kindredspiritsk9.com/traini ... g-collars/


I could easily go on.

I trust their information over your opinions.
You're the one throwing around opinions, without having the slightest clue what you are talking about.



Humans have a habit of justifying abhorrent behaviour if it suits their needs.

Humans have a habit of reacting emotionally and irrationally when they lack knowledge and facts. You are the prefect example of this.

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