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Is My Shower Wall Structural?

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  • Jun 1st, 2021 3:00 pm
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[OP]
Newbie
Sep 29, 2011
23 posts
10 upvotes
WOODBRIDGE

Is My Shower Wall Structural?

I'm in the middle of a master bedroom bathroom remodel (second floor). Part of this entails remodeling the current shower and raising the ceiling height.

The shower is 3x3ft. I removed the 1ft dropped ceiling framing and am hoping to make the shower ceiling flush with the rest of the bathroom. However, as you can see from the attached picture, I want to confirm the double top-plates are not structural? Directly above them is a ceiling joist running perpendicular, and directly on top of that is a truss.

I am fairly confident it is not structural, particularly given the lack of a jack stud on the left side. What is throwing me off is the truss above it and the jack stud on the right. It is also worth mentioning this shower enclosure, 3x3ft, does not span the length of the bathroom (i.e. it is a partial wall).

Thoughts?
Last edited by drivetolive on Jun 5th, 2021 12:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.
6 replies
Deal Addict
Nov 17, 2012
3390 posts
2360 upvotes
Toronto
No - they're not structural.

Can I be 100% certain of this? Of course not. But they're flat 2x4's toenailed in on one end over a shower door. Nothing about that says structural.
Newbie
Mar 24, 2009
82 posts
70 upvotes
KW
Looks like a townhouse??

Nothing structural. Just make sure to put 5/8 back up. Then your second layer.
Deal Addict
Jun 26, 2019
1205 posts
916 upvotes
Should you trust random strangers on the interwebs with the structural stability of your house? No.

Are you required by law to get a permit to remove this wall from your City? Technically yes.

Anyways, first things first, is you probably don't have a joist and a truss above it. You probably have one or the other. If you have trusses in your attic it is more likely that it is not structural, if you have joists in your attic it is more likely that it is structural. Can't confirm 100% either way.

Is the joist above resting on this member? Where are the joists transferring load? What are the spans and joist sizing? What did your City say? etc etc.

It is likely not structural. But this isn't horse shoes or hand grenades, so close doesn't cut it. Most people will answer this, but you can't be sure based on a bunch of random people on the interwebs and limited info.
Newbie
Mar 24, 2009
82 posts
70 upvotes
KW
drivetolive wrote: I'm in the middle of a master bedroom bathroom remodel (second floor). Part of this entails remodeling the current shower and raising the ceiling height.

The shower is 3x3ft. I removed the 1ft dropped ceiling framing and am hoping to make the shower ceiling flush with the rest of the bathroom. However, as you can see from the attached picture, I want to confirm the double top-plates are not structural? Directly above them is a ceiling joist running perpendicular, and directly on top of that is a truss.

I am fairly confident it is not structural, particularly given the lack of a jack stud on the left side. What is throwing me off is the truss above it and the jack stud on the right. It is also worth mentioning this shower enclosure, 3x3ft, does not span the length of the bathroom (i.e. it is a partial wall).

Thoughts?
Again. I will reiterate that there is nothing structural. Another indication are the drywall clips located on the top two plates. You are free to cut that plate if you want….
[OP]
Newbie
Sep 29, 2011
23 posts
10 upvotes
WOODBRIDGE
Appreciate the feedback. I should have clarified, it isn't a "wall" per say, but rather was an opening to the shower covered by a curtain. It was simply a header.

Forgot to mention the two drywall clips, good eye! Once again, thank you.
[OP]
Newbie
Sep 29, 2011
23 posts
10 upvotes
WOODBRIDGE
SubjectivelyObjective wrote: Should you trust random strangers on the interwebs with the structural stability of your house? No.

Are you required by law to get a permit to remove this wall from your City? Technically yes.

Anyways, first things first, is you probably don't have a joist and a truss above it. You probably have one or the other. If you have trusses in your attic it is more likely that it is not structural, if you have joists in your attic it is more likely that it is structural. Can't confirm 100% either way.

Is the joist above resting on this member? Where are the joists transferring load? What are the spans and joist sizing? What did your City say? etc etc.

It is likely not structural. But this isn't horse shoes or hand grenades, so close doesn't cut it. Most people will answer this, but you can't be sure based on a bunch of random people on the interwebs and limited info.
You are correct, and excuse my ignorance regarding attic construction. there is a truss directly above it, however there is a wall 4 ft directly in front of the shower (end of the bathroom), 3 ft to the left of it (also end of the bathrrom), and to the right is obviously another wall. The load is likely transferred on these walls, plus the exterior wall about 10 feet behind the shower.

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