Parenting & Family

My son is bored in class, what to do?

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[OP]
Deal Guru
Dec 5, 2006
12682 posts
7827 upvotes
Markham

My son is bored in class, what to do?

My son is 6 yrs old and in grade one, he graduated from Montessori school, so his knowledge at least math is at grade 2 level. So he is bored in class and didn't really follow teacher 's instructions. Teacher just discussed with us about his behaviour issues. I don't know what to do now. We give him some materials after class, but what should we do to make him a better kid in class?

Thanks
5 replies
Sr. Member
User avatar
Jun 24, 2005
700 posts
115 upvotes
Richmond Hill
We had the same issue. He also has to adjust from a Montessori environment of working mostly alone to working as a group (class). We just lived with the situation until grade 3 when we put him into the gifted program where it is more challenging. He's in grade 6 gifted now.
[OP]
Deal Guru
Dec 5, 2006
12682 posts
7827 upvotes
Markham
rngun wrote: We had the same issue. He also has to adjust from a Montessori environment of working mostly alone to working as a group (class). We just lived with the situation until grade 3 when we put him into the gifted program where it is more challenging. He's in grade 6 gifted now.
thanks. but how did you discuss this with teacher? How did you tell your kid being a good boy or just pretend nothing happened with him?
Deal Addict
Jan 2, 2015
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NOT centre of Univer…
This is the story of my life and my children’s life, so it’s going to be long. Both my kids, now grade 2 &5 finished Montessori, and started grade 1 in public school. My oldest was tested as being gifted by kindy, the youngest not tested but shows the similar traits to giftedness. In both case, we put them in a regular school program rather than a gifted program because of the social enrichment we were looking for. Each year we go through this problem of my children being bored, now 5 years straight.

First you need to get out of your head and your child’s head that he is ‘bad’ or ‘good’. Grade 1 is one of the most challenging year for kids and teachers. In my province, for many this is the first year of full day class, some kids have never in formal school yet, and the range of skills where the kids are is all over the place. You have some kids that don’t know their letters yet, and some kids will be far advanced. The teachers early in the year are just trying to learn where the kids are. Now add in a Montessori child who is used to taking more responsibility in their learning and have more choice, but now has to conform to the classroom. It’s a pretty challenging dynamic.

Each year, I have employed a 3 prong approach. Child, teacher, parents.

For my children, I have always worked with them on strategies for them to advocate for themselves, and help the teacher understand them better. Usually, I know that my children will be bored in the first few weeks as the teacher is just figuring things out. Our rule is that my children must do whatever activities the class has planned no matter how easy or boring it is. They must do it well too. Once they are done, then they also have to find ways to advocate for themselves, with being disruptive. They are expected to ask for more work, or how they can help. The teacher seldom is prepared for this. So we also ask our child to think of ways they can take what the rest of the class is doing, and try something different with it to expand on their own. I also will send my children with additional activities that they can work on while they are finished the regular class work. These activities will generally show what they are capable of in a more subtle manner. I have sent my grade one student with the full Anne of Green Gables to read while she is waiting for the class to be done, my grade 5 children brought in Shakespeare. Both my kids have extra enrichment at home so, they will bring their Spirit of Math homework and work on that. That’s for the first few weeks. We consider it a grace period for the teacher to learn about her class. Afterwards, I am constantly working why my kids on what they can do to stay enriched in class, and ask them for ideas. My youngest decided to take her easy spelling words, and write wonderful stories with the word list each week. I supplied an extra journal, but it was her idea. Sometimes they will make power point presentations, and further research. S

For the teacher, we usually give them until the first parent teacher conference. We ask our child to be patient, and we try to find ways to keep them engaged. Then during the first conference, we first gage to see how in tuned the teacher is. At times, they are quite clueless in their comments, one gave us ideas to teach letters to our child who was reading chapter books. If they are clueless, we will just tell them about our child and how they best learn, what abilities they have, and what works well. Once they have an understanding of our child, this usually at time they are wondering why our kids aren’t in a gifted program, we tell them our developmental goals that we would like see. Most of our goals tend to be non academic in nature but rather about emotional, social, and personal development. Then we ask the teacher what ideas they have. We also offer our ideas and assistance in terms of materials, or tools.

I have found most teachers will work with me and my children. I also always offer what ever support they need, and tell them if there are any additional costs they are not sure of for materials, we help cover them. I keep up to date with my kids and find out what they are learning, and if it seems like they are becoming disengaged, I will schedule a meeting with the teacher.

So my advice is, teach your child tactics to be a part of class (ensure he does the work of the class), give him strategies to advocate for himself when he is done. Make sure he understands, which he should as a Montessori child that he can be a part of the solution or the problem, and has a responsibility not to be disruptive. Have him take part in coming with ideas that keep him from being bored, and encourage him to bring those ideas to the teacher. As a parent you should be supporting your child by helping him through the conversation, and provided support and ideas to the teacher. Keep in the loop, and make sure that you are working together with your teacher.

There’s my short version what we do. Give it some time but keep on it.
On a 'smart' device that isn't always so smart. So please forgive the autocorrects and typos. If it bothers you, then don't read my posts, but don't waste my time correcting me. If you can get past the typos, then my posts generally have some value.
[OP]
Deal Guru
Dec 5, 2006
12682 posts
7827 upvotes
Markham
Macx2mommy wrote: This is the story of my life and my children’s life, so it’s going to be long. Both my kids, now grade 2 &5 finished Montessori, and started grade 1 in public school. My oldest was tested as being gifted by kindy, the youngest not tested but shows the similar traits to giftedness. In both case, we put them in a regular school program rather than a gifted program because of the social enrichment we were looking for. Each year we go through this problem of my children being bored, now 5 years straight.

First you need to get out of your head and your child’s head that he is ‘bad’ or ‘good’. Grade 1 is one of the most challenging year for kids and teachers. In my province, for many this is the first year of full day class, some kids have never in formal school yet, and the range of skills where the kids are is all over the place. You have some kids that don’t know their letters yet, and some kids will be far advanced. The teachers early in the year are just trying to learn where the kids are. Now add in a Montessori child who is used to taking more responsibility in their learning and have more choice, but now has to conform to the classroom. It’s a pretty challenging dynamic.

Each year, I have employed a 3 prong approach. Child, teacher, parents.

For my children, I have always worked with them on strategies for them to advocate for themselves, and help the teacher understand them better. Usually, I know that my children will be bored in the first few weeks as the teacher is just figuring things out. Our rule is that my children must do whatever activities the class has planned no matter how easy or boring it is. They must do it well too. Once they are done, then they also have to find ways to advocate for themselves, with being disruptive. They are expected to ask for more work, or how they can help. The teacher seldom is prepared for this. So we also ask our child to think of ways they can take what the rest of the class is doing, and try something different with it to expand on their own. I also will send my children with additional activities that they can work on while they are finished the regular class work. These activities will generally show what they are capable of in a more subtle manner. I have sent my grade one student with the full Anne of Green Gables to read while she is waiting for the class to be done, my grade 5 children brought in Shakespeare. Both my kids have extra enrichment at home so, they will bring their Spirit of Math homework and work on that. That’s for the first few weeks. We consider it a grace period for the teacher to learn about her class. Afterwards, I am constantly working why my kids on what they can do to stay enriched in class, and ask them for ideas. My youngest decided to take her easy spelling words, and write wonderful stories with the word list each week. I supplied an extra journal, but it was her idea. Sometimes they will make power point presentations, and further research. S

For the teacher, we usually give them until the first parent teacher conference. We ask our child to be patient, and we try to find ways to keep them engaged. Then during the first conference, we first gage to see how in tuned the teacher is. At times, they are quite clueless in their comments, one gave us ideas to teach letters to our child who was reading chapter books. If they are clueless, we will just tell them about our child and how they best learn, what abilities they have, and what works well. Once they have an understanding of our child, this usually at time they are wondering why our kids aren’t in a gifted program, we tell them our developmental goals that we would like see. Most of our goals tend to be non academic in nature but rather about emotional, social, and personal development. Then we ask the teacher what ideas they have. We also offer our ideas and assistance in terms of materials, or tools.

I have found most teachers will work with me and my children. I also always offer what ever support they need, and tell them if there are any additional costs they are not sure of for materials, we help cover them. I keep up to date with my kids and find out what they are learning, and if it seems like they are becoming disengaged, I will schedule a meeting with the teacher.

So my advice is, teach your child tactics to be a part of class (ensure he does the work of the class), give him strategies to advocate for himself when he is done. Make sure he understands, which he should as a Montessori child that he can be a part of the solution or the problem, and has a responsibility not to be disruptive. Have him take part in coming with ideas that keep him from being bored, and encourage him to bring those ideas to the teacher. As a parent you should be supporting your child by helping him through the conversation, and provided support and ideas to the teacher. Keep in the loop, and make sure that you are working together with your teacher.

There’s my short version what we do. Give it some time but keep on it.
Thanks!
Sr. Member
User avatar
Jun 24, 2005
700 posts
115 upvotes
Richmond Hill
smartie wrote:
rngun wrote: We had the same issue. He also has to adjust from a Montessori environment of working mostly alone to working as a group (class). We just lived with the situation until grade 3 when we put him into the gifted program where it is more challenging. He's in grade 6 gifted now.
thanks. but how did you discuss this with teacher? How did you tell your kid being a good boy or just pretend nothing happened with him?
He was a special case as he was assessed with ADHD. So we told the teacher that because of ADHD, he has issues focusing in class. He had to work with a special needs teacher from time to time, and the school had to develop a special Individualized Education Program (IEP) for him.

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