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Need advice for extension cord prong that broke off in outlet

  • Last Updated:
  • May 21st, 2019 8:43 pm
[OP]
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Jan 31, 2007
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Richmond Hill

Need advice for extension cord prong that broke off in outlet

I pulled out my extension cable (properly and by the head) after mowing my lawn and the prong remained inside. :( Do I need to cut power before pulling it, or is it just a ground? Should I wrap pliers in plastic/rubber glove and pull that way?
Help!

Also, my 100ft extension cord needs to be repaired, now. I no longer have a Costco membership card and the cord itself is a few years old. Who terminates cords in York Region? Thank you.

https://ibb.co/MBSg0BP
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9 replies
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Feb 11, 2007
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Oakville
JohnyBGood wrote: I pulled out my extension cable (properly and by the head) after mowing my lawn and the prong remained inside. :( Do I need to cut power before pulling it, or is it just a ground? Should I wrap pliers in plastic/rubber glove and pull that way?
Help!

Also, my 100ft extension cord needs to be repaired, now. I no longer have a Costco membership card and the cord itself is a few years old. Who terminates cords in York Region? Thank you.

https://ibb.co/MBSg0BP
You should be OK to pull it out of the ground, but to be safe, it would be wise to turn off power to that outlet first in case there is a wiring problem.
You can use one of these DIY connectors to repair your cord.
https://www.homedepot.ca/product/levito ... 1000105461

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Last edited by engineered on May 21st, 2019 9:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Jan 25, 2007
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Paris
JohnyBGood wrote: My 100ft cable is 14 gauge. Will this particular head allow for its thickness?
Usually. But if not others will in the same section.
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Oct 2, 2013
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Montreal
JohnyBGood wrote: My 100ft cable is 14 gauge. Will this particular head allow for its thickness?
The plug is rated for 15 AMP. The electrical code state that 15 AMP should use 14 AWG so it will fit ;)
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Aug 9, 2007
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Has happened to me as well. It's ground, so safe to pull out, but as others said, it's best to flip the breaker first.
Second, if you use the cord for 2 prong devices like a weed whipper, then do nothing, as it's not used. If you have 3 prong devices you attach to it, best to replace the end.
[OP]
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Jan 31, 2007
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Richmond Hill
Thanks so much, everyone! I shut off the main, wore a ski glove and pulled it out with pliers (it was long). The plug is also available at Amazon ( https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B0015P708Y/ ) w/ instructions on YouTube.

My mower is only 2 pronged, but I don't know if the LED light on the extension will turn on at the female end to allow operation. I'll find out, tomorrow night. Peace.

EDIT: I just tested it and the female end lights up and the mower (approx 5 yrs old) turns on. So I will hold off on the plug, for now, since IT IS WORKING WITHOUT THE GROUND.
Last edited by JohnyBGood on May 21st, 2019 9:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Oct 15, 2007
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JohnyBGood wrote: Thanks so much, everyone! I shut off the main, wore a ski glove and pulled it out with pliers (it was long). The plug is also available at Amazon ( https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B0015P708Y/ ) w/ instructions on YouTube.

My mower is only 2 pronged, but I don't know if the LED light on the extension will turn on at the female end to allow operation. I'll find out, tomorrow night. Peace.
Here’s a good explanation


If the two prong device is fairly modern, it is sufficiently insulated in its design so that it does not need a separate grounding line (these devices were often referred to as double insulated). It means that the designer has ensured that it is highly unlikely that a consumer can come in contact with a hot lead in the device.

Many modern devices are polarized (one of the prongs is wider than the other) to ensure that the correct part of the device is connected to the hot side of the circuit. This helps ensure safety.

For all of these type devices, a two wire/prong extension cord is adequate, assuming it is rated for the wattage being drawn. This is a function of both the amperage of the tool and the length of the run.

When you plug a two prong device into a three prong extension cord, the device is not connected in any way to the ground wire in the cord. There is no downside in this arrangement, but a two wire/prong extension would do the same thing.

There are older two prong devices that do not have adequate grounding and pose some risk if the device is damaged during use, for example some older metal bodied electric drills. Unfortunately, using a three wire extension will offer no greater protection when used with a two prong appliance.
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