Home & Garden

Need Bathroom Layout Ideas

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  • Dec 27th, 2021 11:04 am
[OP]
Member
Dec 17, 2011
255 posts
95 upvotes
OTTAWA

Need Bathroom Layout Ideas

Merry Christmas everyone I was wondering if anyone could help me design a bathroom layout. I've made a bunch of different layouts but I don't want to skew anyone's creative minds.

The bathroom is 160 inches deep by 80 inches wide. 12" window in the back.

Really struggling and hopping someone has an idea.

Requirements:
1) double vanity (prefer 72")
2) bathtub (prefer 67" + )
3) shower (open to have 2 shower heads)
4) toilet 30" depth
Images
  • bathroom.png
14 replies
Deal Addict
Jan 21, 2011
1131 posts
525 upvotes
GTA
Can you steal some more room from somewhere? 80” is tight.

You can put vanity to left of door, toilet by vanity, shower along entire back wall including window, tub on right side of entry door although I worry about the size of tub.

6’ vanity, 3’ toilet, 42”-48” remaining for shower
Sr. Member
Mar 14, 2018
848 posts
778 upvotes
You have so much room lol. Just separate out each item at corners and place them lengthwise. Here is one idea.

- I think bathtub by the window is the most logical choice. If you have a decent view, it'd be nice to face the window when you lie down.

- Extra cabinetry (the small square) by the bathtub or shower is nice to have.

- Given the size of the room, I'd add a divider wall by the toilet. Hides the look when you enter and you feel enclosed when you use the toilet.

- I like the flow of toilet - cabinet - shower - cabinet - vanity for your daily routine in my layout. But you could swap the locations of vanity and toilet + cabinet.
8378006_original~2.jpg
[OP]
Member
Dec 17, 2011
255 posts
95 upvotes
OTTAWA
lamin wrote: Can you steal some more room from somewhere? 80” is tight.

You can put vanity to left of door, toilet by vanity, shower along entire back wall including window, tub on right side of entry door although I worry about the size of tub.

6’ vanity, 3’ toilet, 42”-48” remaining for shower
Yea I cant steal anyroom :(

Tub to the right of entry door would only be like 28 inches or something pretty narrow
[OP]
Member
Dec 17, 2011
255 posts
95 upvotes
OTTAWA
clutch31 wrote: You have so much room lol. Just separate out each item at corners and place them lengthwise. Here is one idea.

- I think bathtub by the window is the most logical choice. If you have a decent view, it'd be nice to face the window when you lie down.

- Extra cabinetry (the small square) by the bathtub or shower is nice to have.

- Given the size of the room, I'd add a divider wall by the toilet. Hides the look when you enter and you feel enclosed when you use the toilet.

- I like the flow of toilet - cabinet - shower - cabinet - vanity for your daily routine in my layout. But you could swap the locations of vanity and toilet + cabinet.

8378006_original~2.jpg
pretty similar to what I did but I'm thinking a wall for toilet is going to be too tight when sitting
Sr. Member
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Sep 2, 2005
808 posts
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Toronto
reframe the door to the side. a centred entrance is causing all the problem here.
Deal Addict
Jan 21, 2011
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rbkpwnz wrote: Yea I cant steal anyroom :(

Tub to the right of entry door would only be like 28 inches or something pretty narrow
It doesn’t have to be right at the door, give yourself room. Tub and vanity are your two narrowest items. A smaller tub especially in width would help.
Deal Addict
Apr 18, 2005
3334 posts
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Mississauga
Where is this bathroom.. if it's 2nd floor... u already have drain layouts .. while you can move stuff, it's really difficult to move stuff like the toilet drain without affecting the room below with bulkheads. So first let us know where the drains currently are as that may limit some of this design that your requesting.

Also another thing is the direction of floor joists.. as again you cannot cut into them to run drains and vents.
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Oct 19, 2008
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TLSRULZ wrote: Also another thing is the direction of floor joists.. as again you cannot cut into them to run drains and vents.
There are restrictions to follow but it is allowed to drill joists. Hole size will depend if OP has 2x8, 2x10 or engineered joists.

Disclaimer; I have an asshole following me who will probably post you can't cut the entire joist out with a chainsaw and that I don't know what I'm talking about-ignore that jackass.
Last edited by Zamboni on Dec 26th, 2021 2:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Deal Expert
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Sep 1, 2005
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Markham
Might also be good to show floor plan around that bathroom ie where are outside walls, what is adjacent to each wall.
Is this a new house or are you renovating...any limitation on water lines or drains etc?

FYI these are things you can do where space is a bit tighter

> you could make the door a bit smaller by incorporating a more narrow pocket door.
> using pedestal sinks with cabinetry around or beside the pedestal will open up space
> using free standing tub will open up space

Recommend you take some grid paper and create a scaled room
Recommend you make templates for each toilet, shower, tub, vanity/2 pedestals. Make the templates bigger to accommodate clearances for doors etc and then just start moving stuff around. Note custom showers can be square/5 sided/rectangular.
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Member
Nov 13, 2019
291 posts
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Toronto
Is bathtub in the shower the thing to do these days?
Sr. Member
Mar 14, 2018
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timofeewho wrote: Is bathtub in the shower the thing to do these days?
I like the concept and the look but in reality, it will be PITA to clean behind the bathtub I think. Also, it might be challenging to have proper drainage to cover the larger area, especially because you will likely want a curbless entrance.
Deal Fanatic
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Dec 4, 2009
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Open showers are good for magazine homes or if you have someone else cleaning the house regularly (think water stains everywhere).

I think clutch's design is most efficient use of space. No room for a short wall between toilet and door opening. You'll have to go with traditional depth bathroom vanity (as opposed to deeper kitchen depth cabinets) cause there's not enough width between wall and door (have to consider door casing).

Do a single long glass wall between tub and shower, with the opening on the short side. You'll need to leave enough room between your vanity and tub to get into the tub from that side because you'll only have about 14" between the tub and shower wall. Ideally tub and shower wall terminus line up, but I don't think you'll have room for that. The shower wall might need to be shorter so you can access the tub. That means a 5' shower. You could do dual rain cans and jets on the window side wall (though you'll lose 6" to build out the wall for plumbing there). If you opt for jets I'd put a door on the short side, if you're just going with a rain cans and a handheld wand, I would leave the opening completely open. 66" is max tub length (60" would work even better) and max 72" vanity. If you go 5' tub and shower, you'll have nice symmetry in the room. Room width really constrains what you can do.

I would also consider the pocket door idea, swing doors really limit space flexibility.
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Lucky
Deal Expert
Feb 7, 2017
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Eastern Ontario
Wet rooms are definitely a thing right now.

And honestly … make a lot of sense if you want both a tub & shower in a bathroom

Area doesn’t have to be much wider than the tub … and only a tad deeper to accommodate the shower
(See Photos # 3 & # 5 in the linked article = https://www.hgtv.com/design/design-blog ... room-trend )

My next house … definitely gonna have a wet room as part of the Master Bath
Deal Addict
Jan 5, 2003
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If door doesn't open into a hallway where people are walking past (e,g, it's an ensuite or at the end of the hallway), consider having an outswinging door. It usually opens up possibilities and the cost and effort is minimal compared to a pocket door.

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