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need a recommendation on a plunge router

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  • May 17th, 2019 6:02 pm
[OP]
Sr. Member
Oct 3, 2011
583 posts
376 upvotes
OTTAWA

need a recommendation on a plunge router

not thinking about table compatibility at this point, but it might be an option in the future.

I need variable speed and 1/2" collet. Do I need higher power for hardwood? Was reading that variable speed is important so I can go slower on larger bits as to not burn the wood. How high power would I need? Ultimately this will eventually be used in my slab table project when I get to it, so that's the hardest job it will be doing.

I passed up on mastercraft maximum that was on sale last week, some of the reviewers didn't like the plunge base. They had complaints about the action binding. There were also complaints about the rigid products, specifically the plunge base as well, and possibly motor issues.

That would leave dewalt, makita, milwaukee, bosch.. what else is reputable? Not in a rush to buy, I'll be monitoring prices for sales based on recommendations. There are some complaints about the dewalt units as well, but given what's left, they're the only choice on the mid grade vs getting into the higher end of the price range. I'm also probably going to drop in at the makita repair center and see what refurbed units run.
8 replies
Newbie
Jan 4, 2017
93 posts
25 upvotes
Westmount, QC
I have several Bosch 1617s and an MR23. All good options

If money is no object, the Festool OF1400 is even better
Deal Expert
May 30, 2005
45021 posts
5572 upvotes
Richmond Hill
The Maximum is a fine router for the price. It will only bind if you either 1) plunge when it is still starting up (as it is slow start, which is a GOOD thing, btw) or 2) try to take off too much material at a time, which is also a bad thing as it wears down your bit faster. It's pretty much the best router you can buy under $200.

Also, you do not need a plunge base for flattening the slab. In fact I recommend you do NOT plunge for slabbing as there's a higher chance you will get tearout. Just start from the side and go row by row.
Artisan woodworker crafting live edge tables, end grain cutting boards, and other home decor
Silver Coins | Philips Wake-Up Light with Radio | Heatware
[OP]
Sr. Member
Oct 3, 2011
583 posts
376 upvotes
OTTAWA
yeah anything with a festool label is probably 2x more than I'd ever be willing to spend lol. The reviews have been pretty mixed about them being nothing out of the ordinary for a lot more than ordinary price.

I'm looking at the 2 bosch units, what's the difference between the 2 aside from almost 100$?
Deal Fanatic
Jan 25, 2007
9652 posts
5041 upvotes
Paris
The best router ever made was the Ryobi Re601. Also sold under the craftsman name. It was made 20 years ago by Ryobi Japan.
Sr. Member
Apr 8, 2010
779 posts
430 upvotes
toronto
I have the dewalt DW621 which i'm quite happy with. Friend has a Haitachi M12V2 which is awesome. Triton also makes great routers as well.

If you're planning on putting on a table take a look at this company http://routertechnologies.com/routerraizer.htm for a lift/ raiser for it. great price point and i've not had any issues with it in 5 yrs.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Oct 3, 2011
583 posts
376 upvotes
OTTAWA
Jon Lai wrote: The Maximum is a fine router for the price. It will only bind if you either 1) plunge when it is still starting up (as it is slow start, which is a GOOD thing, btw) or 2) try to take off too much material at a time, which is also a bad thing as it wears down your bit faster. It's pretty much the best router you can buy under $200.

Also, you do not need a plunge base for flattening the slab. In fact I recommend you do NOT plunge for slabbing as there's a higher chance you will get tearout. Just start from the side and go row by row.
Yeah about the plunge, I was thinking about it last night and realized they weren't using the plunge feature to flatten. So that opens up the fixed base as a cheaper option, but I think I'd want the plunge base anyways in case I needed it for anything. Guess not much to do at this point aside from price watching.
Sr. Member
Apr 8, 2010
779 posts
430 upvotes
toronto
Jon Lai wrote: The Maximum is a fine router for the price. It will only bind if you either 1) plunge when it is still starting up (as it is slow start, which is a GOOD thing, btw) or 2) try to take off too much material at a time, which is also a bad thing as it wears down your bit faster. It's pretty much the best router you can buy under $200.

Also, you do not need a plunge base for flattening the slab. In fact I recommend you do NOT plunge for slabbing as there's a higher chance you will get tearout. Just start from the side and go row by row.
depending on how the OP plans on flattening the slab a plunge would be great and possibly the only way to take a little off at a time. ie: fixed height router sled. maybe not even fixed height but the ability to set it and then run multiple passes without having to adjust the router sled
Deal Expert
May 30, 2005
45021 posts
5572 upvotes
Richmond Hill
denti72 wrote: depending on how the OP plans on flattening the slab a plunge would be great and possibly the only way to take a little off at a time. ie: fixed height router sled. maybe not even fixed height but the ability to set it and then run multiple passes without having to adjust the router sled
Fixed base routers typically also have a micro height adjustment, the only difference between that and a plunge base is just that you can't only route in the middle of the work piece. But for flattening a slab, you are flattening the entire slab, so there is no need to plunge.
Artisan woodworker crafting live edge tables, end grain cutting boards, and other home decor
Silver Coins | Philips Wake-Up Light with Radio | Heatware

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