Home & Garden

Neighbour's furnace venting into my side door

  • Last Updated:
  • Dec 25th, 2020 8:46 pm
[OP]
Newbie
Dec 21, 2020
3 posts
10 upvotes

Neighbour's furnace venting into my side door

Hey my neighbour just installed a new furnace and it vents directly into my side door.
I just want to know if they are breaking any kind of law or code with this install.
They literally installed this about 2 hours ago, and our relationship with this neighbour is already rocky.
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61 replies
Deal Addict
Feb 24, 2008
2999 posts
1591 upvotes
Mississauga
Holy shit your houses are close together
Not including your step down, there's what, 2-3 feet between the houses?

Not sure about code, but that doesn't look right. I'd be pissed
Deal Fanatic
Jan 25, 2007
9987 posts
5259 upvotes
Paris
99% sure that’s a no-no.

Those look like 18” patio stones, so seperation of 36”?
Member
Dec 6, 2020
390 posts
368 upvotes
The Canadian gas code (CSA B149.1) prohibits the installation of exhaust vents for gas appliances within 4' of a property line. Further, at minimum, the discharge gases from a though-wall vent must be directed downwards to protect against water ingress and to reduce the risk of causing ice buildup on adjacent surfaces. Unless Ontario has not adopted the relevant parts of B149.1, this is an open-and-shut case.

Call your municipal building inspector's office.
Deal Fanatic
Sep 9, 2010
5060 posts
3212 upvotes
Burnaby
There's an older thread discussing, IMO, a similar case, although its [OP] didn't update the outcome of his case: Gas furnace/water heater venting regulations. Maybe he can comment about his experience.
yare yare daze...
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Deal Expert
User avatar
May 10, 2005
36161 posts
10285 upvotes
Ottawa
KevinM56081 wrote: Call TSSA and the building inspector.
I also suspect it is too close to the ground. It could be covered up with snow and cause serious issues.
I definitely would call an inspector.
Inform your neighbor abut the code and inform him that if they do not do something, you will call the inspector yourself.
The Government cannot give to anybody anything that the Government does not first take from somebody else.
Temp. Banned
Apr 29, 2010
569 posts
933 upvotes
GTA
Lmao I’d be so pissed if that happened to me

Please keep us updated OP
Newbie
Aug 14, 2019
64 posts
11 upvotes
How do you even had a side door there tho? The code requirement is also to have a minimum of 4 ft from the door to the property line, which visually doesn’t look like you have. Calling an inspector might land you in hot water too..
Newbie
Apr 28, 2016
97 posts
38 upvotes
BargainHunterCan wrote: How do you even had a side door there tho? The code requirement is also to have a minimum of 4 ft from the door to the property line, which visually doesn’t look like you have. Calling an inspector might land you in hot water too..
Wondering the same thing, side entrance can't be legal.
Sr. Member
Apr 29, 2007
642 posts
314 upvotes
Richmond Hill
BargainHunterCan wrote: How do you even had a side door there tho? The code requirement is also to have a minimum of 4 ft from the door to the property line, which visually doesn’t look like you have. Calling an inspector might land you in hot water too..
Oooh this is going to be an interesting dilemma
Sr. Member
Feb 17, 2015
877 posts
981 upvotes
Canada
If all these venting are new, the installer should have offset them away from the front door. Or make the vent in the middle sideways too, same as the one on the right.
Sr. Member
User avatar
Feb 25, 2004
961 posts
432 upvotes
Longueuil
Even without the door it doesn't make sense to vent directly on another house so close.

The door might be legal though, builders can get a derogation from the city. On my street almost every house has a "protuberance" on one side with a window which makes it 2 inches from the property line (but about 13 feet from the other house because of the neighbor's driveway). When I bought my house, this was on the official document that the window was legal, the city allowed it.
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Deal Addict
User avatar
Nov 7, 2016
1738 posts
788 upvotes
Ontario
JEDI Force wrote: Even without the door it doesn't make sense to vent directly on another house so close.

The door might be legal though, builders can get a derogation from the city. On my street almost every house has a "protuberance" on one side with a window which makes it 2 inches from the property line (but about 13 feet from the other house because of the neighbor's driveway). When I bought my house, this was on the official document that the window was legal, the city allowed it.
Imagine a neighbour building a fence on the property line 2" from the window, lol...
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Deal Expert
May 30, 2005
45348 posts
5908 upvotes
Richmond Hill
JEDI Force wrote: Even without the door it doesn't make sense to vent directly on another house so close.

The door might be legal though, builders can get a derogation from the city. On my street almost every house has a "protuberance" on one side with a window which makes it 2 inches from the property line (but about 13 feet from the other house because of the neighbor's driveway). When I bought my house, this was on the official document that the window was legal, the city allowed it.
At least that's a window and not a door.
Deal Addict
Dec 19, 2009
3995 posts
1949 upvotes
middleofnowhere wrote: The Canadian gas code (CSA B149.1) prohibits the installation of exhaust vents for gas appliances within 4' of a property line. Further, at minimum, the discharge gases from a though-wall vent must be directed downwards to protect against water ingress and to reduce the risk of causing ice buildup on adjacent surfaces. Unless Ontario has not adopted the relevant parts of B149.1, this is an open-and-shut case.

Call your municipal building inspector's office.
This is from the 2010 code book. Do you have a the updated version (2015) or later or the other section where it's stated. Also in the 2010 book a swimming pool heater has to 18" away from a properrty line so did that change as well?

8.14.8
A vent shall not terminate
(a) directly above a paved sidewalk or paved driveway that is located between two single-family
dwellings and serves both dwellings;
(b) less than 7 ft (2.1 m) above a paved sidewalk or a paved driveway that is located on public property;
(c) within 6 ft (1.8 m) of a mechanical air-supply inlet to any building;
(d) above a meter and regulator assembly within 3 ft (900 mm) horizontally of the vertical centreline
of the regulator vent outlet to a maximum vertical distance of 15 ft (4.5 m);
(e) within 3 ft (900 mm) of any gas pressure regulator vent outlet;
(f) less than 1 ft (300 mm) above grade level;
(g) within the following distances of a window or door that can be opened in any building, of any
nonmechanical air-supply inlet to any building, or of the combustion air inlet of any other
appliance:
(i) 6 in (150 mm) for inputs up to and including 10 000 Btuh (3 kW);
(ii) 12 in (300 mm) for inputs from 10 000 Btuh (3 kW) up to and including 100 000 Btuh
(30 kW); and
(iii) 3 ft (900 mm) for inputs exceeding 100 000 Btuh (30 kW); and
(h) underneath a veranda, porch, or deck unless
(i) the veranda, porch, or deck is fully open on a minimum of two sides beneath the floor; and
(ii) the distance between the top of the vent termination and the underside of the veranda, porch,
or deck is greater than 1 ft (300 mm).

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