Art and Photography

New camera - need advice

  • Last Updated:
  • Aug 10th, 2017 8:45 pm
Jr. Member
Feb 11, 2010
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Jones10 wrote: Do you have additional lenses for the A6000? (Is it even possible?) I will have a look at it right away, thank you for your honest opinion! :-)
Also have sigma 30mm 2.8 DN Art. But nerveless you can grab any lens that suite your need and budget. The A6000 uses Sony E Mount. You can check Sony website for E-Mount lens and they have many. 3rd party like Sigma also make lens for Sony. There are two type of E-Mount lens. E Mount Lens which is APS-C type (Crop sensor lens) and FE Mount lens which is Sony's Full Frame sensor lens.

If you install a FE lens on A6000 you get 1.6X more reach.. for example 85mm FE lens on A6000 will be equivalent to 136mm.
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May 17, 2012
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If you are exploring your options, micro four thirds (olympus and panasonic) is another mirrorless system worthy of a look. Lenses are less expensive and more plentiful than in the sony e mount space. The form factor of the bodies and lenses also tends to be smaller than dslrs, sony and Fuji. Olympus' IBIS (in body image stabilization) is a superior system allowing you to shoot stationary objects at ridiculously slow shutter speeds.

Disclosure, I shoot with olympus omd em10. To me, the best camera is one you are willing to lug around with you to actually take pics. A camera is no good sitting at home because it's too big & heavy. Secondly to me, avaiability and price of lenses. The trinity of low light prime lenses in m43; olympus 17mm 1.8, panasonic 25mm 1.7 and olympus 45mm 1.8 will set you back maybe 700-800 USD, and far less on the used market.

If size is of no concern then I suggest you stay in the Nikon or canon eco system. They are by far the most mature systems with a huge selection of lenses and accessories on both new and used markets.
[OP]
Newbie
Oct 5, 2016
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esoxhntr wrote: A camera is no good sitting at home because it's too big & heavy.
This ⬆ .. I want a camera that I can carry around and use for all sorts of stuff, therefore it has to be nimble and easy to handle.
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Jones10 wrote: This ⬆ .. I want a camera that I can carry around and use for all sorts of stuff, therefore it has to be nimble and easy to handle.
Then I would suggest you look at perhaps the 1" sensor compacts. The RX100 or Canon G#x series are pretty good, I can't recall the Panasonic equivalent but they are right up there as well.
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May 5, 2010
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racing.racing wrote: Also have sigma 30mm 2.8 DN Art. But nerveless you can grab any lens that suite your need and budget. The A6000 uses Sony E Mount. You can check Sony website for E-Mount lens and they have many. 3rd party like Sigma also make lens for Sony. There are two type of E-Mount lens. E Mount Lens which is APS-C type (Crop sensor lens) and FE Mount lens which is Sony's Full Frame sensor lens.

If you install a FE lens on A6000 you get 1.6X more reach.. for example 85mm FE lens on A6000 will be equivalent to 136mm.
Any lenses put on an A6000 will get 1.5x zoom (I think 1.6x is for Canon' slightly smaller APS-C). Sony has a 50mm for APS-C emount and a 50mm for FE and both will be a 75mm equivalent on the A6000.
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Feb 16, 2006
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goofball wrote: Then I would suggest you look at perhaps the 1" sensor compacts. The RX100 or Canon G#x series are pretty good, I can't recall the Panasonic equivalent but they are right up there as well.
Panasonic Lumix LX10 or ZS100 for a 1" sensor compact .
https://www.dpreview.com/reviews/2017-r ... -cameras/6

But these are going to be about $1000 CAD. Note: I actually find it a bit too small for handling at times but almost always have my ZS100 with me when I go out. For wildlife and air shows I use my DSLR & 50-500 lens. The smaller ZS100 is not able to handle these tasks to my satisfaction.

If you're willing to get a bit bulkier and to expand your $$ budget (substantially), some of the long zoom 1" sensor are maybe more suited for wildlife, sports, and airshows.
https://www.dpreview.com/reviews/2017-r ... om-cameras

But for what you would pay for a Sony RX10 III I'd rather get a Four Thirds sensor body and add lens as required. The RX10/FZ1000/G3 cameras do appeal to me for their all in one lens design for travel.

Go onto Flickr and check out what people are doing with their cameras by searching on the camera model number and then choose "interesting" images as your filter.

i.e. https://www.flickr.com/search/?text=zs1 ... gness-desc

.
[OP]
Newbie
Oct 5, 2016
19 posts
Additionally, anyone that has experience with Canon EOS M3???
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Jones10 wrote: Can anybody tell me more about bridge cameras? Not a term I'm familiar with? And thank you NewsyL by the way!
Did you even read the article ?? Lol
...Bridge cameras are typically aimed at professionals and prosumers who have an SLR but want something lighter that they can carry with them at all times, yet which still have the manual controls associated with the higher-end cameras.
The Sony RX10 III from the article is probably one of the best example from the class, may be read up on that, but the picture quality would be better from a mirrorless still, given the bigger sensor.
Jones10 wrote: Additionally, anyone that has experience with Canon EOS M3???
If you are interested a Canon, look at the newer M6 at least. You see, the problem with Canon is they got into the mirrorless game much too late, making them years and generations behind others. For example, Sony had released 5-6 generations of NEX before Canon even did their first and it was a bit of disaster for Canon then. Their bodies weren't really upto par until the recent M6 but even now, I don't know if they are rated that favourably against the top end Sony or Fuji or Panasonic, which are all more established in the mirrorless market.
The Devil made me buy it - RFD. :twisted:
[OP]
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Oct 5, 2016
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hdom wrote: Did you even read the article ?? Lol
Yes, I did - however, from this
Bridge cameras are typically aimed at professionals and prosumers who have an SLR but want something lighter that they can carry with them at all times, yet which still have the manual controls associated with the higher-end cameras.
I am not entirely sure still what it is? It just states that it's lighter.

So hdom, if you were to choose a camera, would you pick a bridge or mirrorless?
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Mar 6, 2003
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Jones10 wrote: Yes, I did - however, from this I am not entirely sure still what it is? It just states that it's lighter.
common attributes of a bridge camera.
- bigger than a point and shoot but smaller than a DSLR with an equivalent lens.
- cannot change lenses
- has a higher quality wide range zoom lens (wide angle all the way to high telephoto...usually a 10X range or better). On some bridge cameras like the RX10, it has a fast lens of similar quality to a good DSLR lens.
- sensor is smaller than mirrorless camera. Most of them have 1" sensors just like the best point and shoots.
- has more controls similar to a DSLR, so good for people that like to adjust things manually.

Basically, it's for people that want a versatile all in one camera that has a good lens. That's why it's suggested to be a good travel camera. Usually when you travel you don't want to change lenses.
RFD is not just about saving money, it's about the thrill of the hunt and getting the stuff I want without paying full price like Joe Shmoe did.
This applies to everyday items as well as high end items that I don't really need.
[OP]
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Oct 5, 2016
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warpdrive wrote: common attributes of a bridge camera.
- bigger than a point and shoot but smaller than a DSLR with an equivalent lens.
- cannot change lenses
- has a higher quality wide range zoom lens (wide angle all the way to high telephoto...usually a 10X range or better). On some bridge cameras like the RX10, it has a fast lens of similar quality to a good DSLR lens.
- sensor is smaller than mirrorless camera. Most of them have 1" sensors just like the best point and shoots.
- has more controls similar to a DSLR, so good for people that like to adjust things manually.

Basically, it's for people that want a versatile all in one camera that has a good lens. That's why it's suggested to be a good travel camera. Usually when you travel you don't want to change lenses.
Thank you! This answer is by far the best I've received.
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Jones10 wrote: Thank you! This answer is by far the best I've received.
No problem. My answer is applicable/correct for the newer bridge cameras like the RX10 or Panasonic FZ1000. Some of the cheaper bridge cameras may lack some of the attributes that I've stated (for example, sensor is smaller than 1" or lens is of lower quality), but in general, expect a wide range lens, a size somewhere in between a point and shoot and DSLR, and all-in-one versatility.
RFD is not just about saving money, it's about the thrill of the hunt and getting the stuff I want without paying full price like Joe Shmoe did.
This applies to everyday items as well as high end items that I don't really need.
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May 31, 2005
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Jones10 wrote: Hey all,
I'm in the market for a new camera, wanting to upgrade from a 10-year-old digital that I got as a present.
I've been talking to quite a few dealers and most of them told me to go for the Canon EOS 80D. I've been researching a bit online and it seems to have many great reviews. My question is, however, have any of you been using it/know somebody who owns one or alike?

I wish to gain as much knowledge as I can before purchasing something that expensive!
Thank you for all your inputs.
-!- Now looking at the Sony A6000 based on feedback from the forum -!-
Canon SL2 is smaller, lighter and a lot cheaper. it has the same IQ / sensor as 80D, DPAF, flip touch screen, wifi / bluetooth. the only downside I can see is the ridiculous ancient 9-point AF.
there are many reasons to buy the 80D though. micro focus adjustment, 7 fps, 100% coverage pentaprism viewfinder, longer battery life. if none of these matters to you, get the SL2!
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Jun 15, 2012
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If you get a bridge, make sure it's a 1" sensor.
They are probably the best compromise for an amateur who doesn't want to switch lenses, and/or portable vacation camera if you want long distance sacrificing some image quality.

OP, I shoot paid work with Canon full frame but I personally would not buy Canon mirrorless, they use dedicated mirrorless lenses and it's a small Canon-M kijiji market. If you ever decide to sell, there will be a very small pool of interested buyers. Either you'll have a hard time, or you'll take a big loss.

After film, my first digital camera was a bridge camera, after a while I was not satisfied with the quality and began buying DSLR's. Today's bridge cameras are excellent but if you don't need the long optical zoom, you can get an equally good 1" point and shoot like an RX100, or ZS100 that has a bit more reach. Unless I'm on a safari, I'm typically shooting landscapes and portraits on vacation and don't need to shoot long.

The end result is up to you... composition, using light effectively, the moment, and editing contribute to great shots over comparable gear.
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I would stick to a mirrorless since coming from a DSLR, it is already lighter and more compact for me.

As a former Bridge camera owner, the thing I don't like about them is, it is just too close to a P&S. The RX10, as an example, even has the same sensor and internal as the RX100, Sony mainly just added a long zoom lens onto it and a much higher price tag. It was really designed too as a "bridging" camera for people that wanted to have more manual control or zoom from their P&S but is kinda intimidated by a DSLR/Mirrorless.

Honestly, since you had a DSLR already, at this point you should focus on getting a good mirrorless camera, bridge would be too far of a step down. Unless, you really want the lightest body possible and a mega long zoom, at the expense of PQ & AF (compared to a mirrorless/DSLR).

Under your original request to have a camera for kids indoors, a bridge camera wouldn't do as well and may be worst than a P&S due the slower nature of a long lens.

Just stick to upper end mirrorless model from Sony/Fuji/Panasonic/Olympics and you will be fine.
Jones10 wrote: ... So hdom, if you were to choose a camera, would you pick a bridge or mirrorless?
Last edited by hdom on Aug 10th, 2017 11:44 am, edited 1 time in total.
The Devil made me buy it - RFD. :twisted:
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One thing to remember, if you delve into telephoto lenses, you lose most of the mirrorless weight/size advantage.
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traderjay wrote: One thing to remember, if you delve into telephoto lenses, you lose most of the mirrorless weight/size advantage.
+1

But you will get a bit of a workout to keep those arms and core toned.....

My DLSR + 50-500 = about 8lbs; add a 70-200 f/2.8 and 12-24 lens, a few accessories like the battery charger, extra batteries, loupe & electrostatic brush, a monopod, and the weight of the bag itself and you are lifting a 15lbs + camera bag before you know it.

.

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