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New Gas Range stove causing strong cooking smell/fumes to enter the upstairs room areas.

  • Last Updated:
  • Dec 20th, 2019 12:28 pm
[OP]
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Dec 13, 2018
36 posts
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Markham

New Gas Range stove causing strong cooking smell/fumes to enter the upstairs room areas.

Hi all,

I have recently bought a new gas range stove to replace my old one. Ever since I got my new stove installed, the cooking odour and fume would end up in the upstairs portion of my house. It felt like the range hood was not even doing it's job. I had no problem with the old gas stove, worked like a charm, the fumes and odours where vented out perfectly by the range hood. After doing some extensive research, I figured that maybe the new stove was overpowered and needed a range hood with higher CFM. I ended up installing a new range hood with 680 CFM. Overall, there was a slight improvement but the cooking odour and fumes are still making their way to the upstairs portion of my house. The odour and fume feel more toxic when baking, harder to breath. Im still going crazy trying to figure out why this new stove is causing the food odour and fume to escape into the second floor of the house. My second floor area smells more like a kitchen then my actual kitchen located on the main floor. I hope someone has experience with the problem and happens to have a solution! One more thing, the smoke detectors go crazy every-time I cook or bake something.


This is the stove that I've bought:

https://www.homedepot.com/p/GE-Adora-5- ... /206214773



Useful Specs:

Burner No.1 BTU15000

Burner No.2 BTU18000

Burner No.3 BTU9500

Burner No.4 BTU5000

Burner No.5 BTU8000

Capacity of Oven (cu. ft.)5.0





My old gas range was a maytag supercapacity plus. I dont quite know the specs for that.
Last edited by ironmonger556 on Dec 12th, 2019 11:44 pm, edited 2 times in total.
42 replies
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Aug 19, 2010
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Are there any vents in your kitchen or near the stove? Any vents on the second floor? Odours could be transferring that way. Another way could be the odours seeping through outlets and going through walls.
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May 23, 2009
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Maybe you are back drafting due to negative air pressure in your home.

You can test by temporary creating make up air. Crack open a window in your kitchen and see if your range hood vents the air better without the odour going to your 2nd floor.
[OP]
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Dec 13, 2018
36 posts
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Markham
sandy_beach wrote: Are there any vents in your kitchen or near the stove? Any vents on the second floor? Odours could be transferring that way. Another way could be the odours seeping through outlets and going through walls.
there are vents in the kitchen and second floor but they are not close to the stove plus I didn't have a problem with my old gas range.
[OP]
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Dec 13, 2018
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Markham
bubuski wrote: Maybe you are back drafting due to negative air pressure in your home.

You can test by temporary creating make up air. Crack open a window in your kitchen and see if your range hood vents the air better without the odour going to your 2nd floor.
tried that the fumes and odours just keeping going upstairs.
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Aug 12, 2007
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ironmonger556 wrote: there are vents in the kitchen and second floor but they are not close to the stove plus I didn't have a problem with my old gas range.
Did you have any other work done other then the stove and subsquently the exhaust fan?

In the absence of the above, and your description of "fume" I suspect it might be paint baking on the stove ( like a new car smell )? If the stove has a self cleaning cycle , i would put it thru that to bake the oven.

If the grills are not ceramic coated and are simply cast iron, I would toss them in the oven during the cycle.

p.s: 680 cfm! dddddddooooooodd. If you need a 680cfm fan, your placement is wrong and you dont really need a jet engine in your kitchen.
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[OP]
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Dec 13, 2018
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Markham
Supahhh wrote: Did you have any other work done other then the stove and subsquently the exhaust fan?

In the absence of the above, and your description of "fume" I suspect it might be paint baking on the stove ( like a new car smell )? If the stove has a self cleaning cycle , i would put it thru that to bake the oven.

If the grills are not ceramic coated and are simply cast iron, I would toss them in the oven during the cycle.

p.s: 680 cfm! dddddddooooooodd. If you need a 680cfm fan, your placement is wrong and you dont really need a jet engine in your kitchen.
No other work done other than fan and stove. To be specific the stove is now 3 years old. i think the “new car smell” would of wore off by now? However, i never experimented with the self cleaning feature. Grills are cast iron, will try the cycle cleaning. Yeah 680cfm, i was told is powerful but at the time,i just cared about getting rid of the fumes and smell so just got the most powerful one in store hoping to solve the problem once and for all because it was driving me nuts!

What factor does placement play? I had same setup with my previous gas range.
Last edited by ironmonger556 on Dec 13th, 2019 12:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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ironmonger556 wrote: No other work done other than fan and stove. To be specific the stove is now 3 years old. i think the “new car smell” would wore off by now? However, i never experimented with the self cleaning feature. Grills are cast iron, will try the cycle cleaning. Yeah 680cfm, i was told is powerful but at the time,i just cared about getting rid of the fumes and smell so just got the most powerful one in store hoping to solve the problem once and for all because it was driving me nuts!

What factor does placement play? I had same setup with my previous gas range.
A fan hood has to be set for circulation or for venting outside. Maybe you did not make the proper setting?
Also, there ducted and ductless types of hood, maybe you got the wrong one?
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[OP]
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Dec 13, 2018
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Markham
Pete_Coach wrote: A fan hood has to be set for circulation or for venting outside. Maybe you did not make the proper setting?
Also, there ducted and ductless types of hood, maybe you got the wrong one?
How would you set circulation/venting. I thought If it ducted it is only set for venting, and if it ductless it only set flr circulating. I bought a ducted range hood because my previous range hood was ducted


This is the range good I bought:

Cyclone 30-inch, 680 CFM Undermount Range Hood with Round Ducting in Stainless Steel

https://www.homedepot.ca/product/cyclon ... MYQAvD_BwE
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ironmonger556 wrote: How would you set circulation/venting. I thought If it ducted it is only set for venting, and if it ductless it only set flr circulating. I bought a ducted range hood because my previous range hood was ducted


This is the range good I bought:

Cyclone 30-inch, 680 CFM Undermount Range Hood with Round Ducting in Stainless Steel

https://www.homedepot.ca/product/cyclon ... MYQAvD_BwE
OK. I am not familiar with yours but when I bought mine, I had to set a cover over the fan to direct the vented air to the back of it and to the out side vent or to leave it and vent it out the front (recirculate).
Maybe you have a blockage in your ducts or disconnected? Thereby not ducting at all?
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Possibly your range hood exhaust vent got clogged/blocked around the same time the new range went in. Not necessarily a related action. Maybe something just happened to build a nest there that same week.

Find the vent on the outside of your house where the range hood vents to. make sure it's pumping out lots of air (with your 680cfm fan it should be lots) when the fan is on.
[OP]
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Dec 13, 2018
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Markham
Kevinck wrote: Possibly your range hood exhaust vent got clogged/blocked around the same time the new range went in. Not necessarily a related action. Maybe something just happened to build a nest there that same week.

Find the vent on the outside of your house where the range hood vents to. make sure it's pumping out lots of air (with your 680cfm fan it should be lots) when the fan is on.
How do you make sure it pumping out lots of air other than visually seeing the vent flaps open?
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May 26, 2017
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I have what looks like a similar range hood under a different name. Mine cannot recirculate, only made to vent.
There is a flap on top of the hood and another flap on the outside vent. I would suggest checking both flaps.

On my hood, the ducts are 6 inch all the way through and all sealed. Some people add reducers to aid in installation that restrict airflow that may be OK with low cfm fans but they won't work with high cfm fans.

If there are any leaks in the ducts the high cfm will just blow through it. The ducts can also restrict due to grease build up.
[OP]
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Dec 13, 2018
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Markham
dm1111 wrote: I have what looks like a similar range hood under a different name. Mine cannot recirculate, only made to vent.
There is a flap on top of the hood and another flap on the outside vent. I would suggest checking both flaps.

On my hood, the ducts are 6 inch all the way through and all sealed. Some people add reducers to aid in installation that restrict airflow that may be OK with low cfm fans but they won't work with high cfm fans.

If there are any leaks in the ducts the high cfm will just blow through it. The ducts can also restrict due to grease build up.

I think my duct is less than 6inch. I recall placing 5 to 6 inch converter because my hood was designed for 6 inch. How do you deal with grease build up if that may be the case?
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This could be a combination of things.
The first thing I would do is check outside to see if there are obvious signs of bird or insect nests in the vent. It may not be obvious, and you should try and look inside the ducting. These boroscopes are great for things like this Amazon Boroscope (I'm not recommending this one in particular; you'll need to do the research here)

If there is no apparent blockage, I'm going to suggest that the ducts are both undersized for the CFM the new hood is pushing, plus the ducts aren't taped properly. If you push more air into too small a duct, it's going to leak out everywhere, and that will be inside your wall. If there are gaps in the subfloor/top/bottom plates in the bedroom it will is allow the pressurized air caused by the restricted flow to escape into the bedroom.
Also, in wood frame construction, furnace cold air returns are typically created by simply cutting through the top and bottom plates of walls, attaching sheet metal and using that space as a duct. Sometimes they get sealed properly, sometimes not. If your exhaust ducting is leaking, the air could be being pushed into the wall cavity and then into a cold air return.
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ironmonger556 wrote: How do you make sure it pumping out lots of air other than visually seeing the vent flaps open?
On my house i can read it with a stepladder. go up there (if it's safe) and feel the air. I identified an installation problem with my range hood because no matter if i put the hood on low or high i felt the same meager amount of air at the outside vent. It opened the flaps but it wasn't much. when i had it hooked up properly then i found a light breeze on low and a constant blast of air on high.
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5" duct? I have a 8" one for not much more CFM (maybe less claimed).

How long is the duct run? If it's a longish run with lots of turns, 5" duct is very constricted.

I'd wager that if the air through put through the ducts is constricted by whatever, trying to force more air through at a higher fan speed will just result in more exhaust blow back. You can try a lower fan speed and if cooking smell is less noticeable, you have an answer to your problem.
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ironmonger556 wrote: What factor does placement play? I had same setup with my previous gas range.
did the previous fan have the cutout for the fan in the same spot?
Does the new fan have two cutouts ( top and back )and is the unused cutout blocked firmly ?
How high is the fan above the surface of the stove?
Is it directly above or is it setback?
Did the stove get installed all the way back against the wall ? ( Ive seen in many instances where there is a gap of 4 inches from the wall because the socket for the plug doesnt let it push up against the wall.
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[OP]
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Markham
I think i found the culprit. The bottom flap doesn't open. I think there grease blockage
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