Shopping Discussion

NEW Walmart Canada return policy (temporary)

  • Last Updated:
  • Nov 22nd, 2020 7:02 pm
Deal Fanatic
Jul 13, 2012
6903 posts
956 upvotes
Ottawa
MaxPower19 wrote: Retail return policies are subject to change, and it doesn’t have to be grandfathered. If you don’t think that’s right, call CP24 or Global News or whoever and take your concerns public and see how it goes.
You can't unilaterally change the terms of a transaction after it's completed.
Deal Addict
Dec 19, 2009
3848 posts
1850 upvotes
MaxPower19 wrote: No, they reserve the right to retroactively change it. Hoarders abused the system so it’s justified. If someone has an issue with it, I highly suggest going to the media and seeing how that works out.
Yes Walmart can can go back and retroactively charge your credit card more because they changed their policy now to state hoarders pay triple the listed price. And if you don't like it call CP24 or Global News or whoever.
Member
Apr 4, 2017
481 posts
384 upvotes
Evil Baby wrote: What still has a supply shortage? The only thing I can't find is Tylenol.
Toilet paper is in short supply (unless you want to buy small packs at inflated prices in Shoppers etc.
Deal Expert
Jan 7, 2002
21023 posts
14952 upvotes
Waterloo, ON
engineered wrote: Yes, I hope they don't allow return of items like toilet paper and soap/sanitizer.
Especially open packages ;)
veni, vidi, Visa
Deal Expert
Mar 23, 2004
27620 posts
7970 upvotes
MaxPower19 wrote: Hand sanitizer, Lysol wipes, baby wipes
Pretty sure sanitiser is the only thing that actually has a actual shortage as opposed to a shortage of stock at retailers and not enough in the logistics chain to replenish it. In other words, it's OOS everywhere because of hoarding, not because the manufacturers have shortages. TP, same thing--manufacturers are just seeing sales soar because of this, they are laughing. However stores can't keep it on the shelves because of the clowns continuing to buy it like man with no arms.

Sanitiser has both effects, it seems the actual manufacture of this stuff is a problem and it's been hoarded up long time ago.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Feb 11, 2009
17574 posts
4529 upvotes
Toronto
I'm pretty sure there's always been a clause in the Walmart return policy that they can reject a return for any reason or something along those lines.
Real Estate Agent, MAcc, CPA, CA
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jan 3, 2014
2744 posts
1943 upvotes
Vancouver(ish)
Karala wrote: Legally I say the hoarders win.
Nope. As long as the policy is not in violation of consumer protection law, a 'policy' is not a legal contract, and therefore changes to that policy have the same legal standing. You could complain to the BBB or post your nasty reviews online, but a store's policy doesn't meet the basic requirements of what constitutes a contract.

Now, if a customer had a history of purchasing large amounts of - for example - lysol wipes or toilet paper and then returning a bunch of them for a full refund, they may have some validity to an argument that the change in 'policy' is unfair and unreasonable and perhaps even that you suffered a loss as a result. But if such a purchase was outside their normal purchasing habits and is without basis (for example, they don't own a business), their argument would be very weak indeed. Doubly so if this purchase was during a crisis time such as now. Quadruply so if you're shown in the media saying you're a hustler and boasting about how much money you've made.

Now, even assuming that you had valid points to raise, you'd have to show a financial loss, which would be extremely difficult to do in this situation. You bought the merchandise of your own free will and it's not common practice to expect that you could buy out a store's supply of a product only to return half of it later. It wouldn't take much for a retailer to show there was no loss, so any award would be minimal.
Proud RFD member since January 31, 2007. Feel free to add 3,034 to my post count.
Deal Addict
Dec 19, 2009
3848 posts
1850 upvotes
MaxPower19 wrote: Under Canadian law, the price cannot be changed however some other terms of sale with respect to return policies can be changed.
Got proof ... or just your opinion?
Show me the proof.
Deal Addict
Dec 19, 2009
3848 posts
1850 upvotes
MaxPower19 wrote: That link is the law regarding returns. Store return policies are not the law.
There's nothing in that link regarding returns.
Deal Addict
Dec 19, 2009
3848 posts
1850 upvotes
MaxPower19 wrote: All responsibilities of businesses with respect to sales are there. If something’s not there, it’s not the law. This is why we haven’t seen class action lawsuits, etc. Anyway, I’m tired of this. If you want we can get a legal opinion and the person who is wrong pays the person who is right $1000. I’ll even let you pick the lawyer.

One day you say company policies fall under the law ... the next day they don't.
Trolling at it's finest.

MaxPower19 wrote: Under Canadian law, the price cannot be changed however some other terms of sale with respect to return policies can be changed.
Member
Feb 18, 2014
491 posts
287 upvotes
Regardless what the law is, if you want to look like a douche by all means, make a scene when returning whatever items you want. Call CP24 to your hearts content.
Keep in mind, you may be asked to leave the store.
Deal Fanatic
Jul 13, 2012
6903 posts
956 upvotes
Ottawa
MaxPower19 wrote: Governed by provincial laws which are all basically the same - stores do not have to take returns if products are not defective:

http://www.bclaws.ca/civix/document/id/ ... g/96410_01
By default it's not required, but it could easily be argued that if a company is expressly stating that they will accept returns at the time of sale, then it cannot be unilaterally changed because it was part of the terms of the sale.
It would be like if I ran a computer shop. If I sell you a computer and it breaks down a year from now, I am under no obligation to fix it for you. However, what if when I sold it to you there was a big banner at the sales counter that said "if it breaks down within three years, we will fix it for you at no charge!". I would undoubtedly get more sales because of that policy, but I would not simply be able to change it and deny service to the people who bought it when the policy was in effect.
Deal Fanatic
Jul 13, 2012
6903 posts
956 upvotes
Ottawa
MaxPower19 wrote: Both pricing and defective merchandise/warranties are covered by the relevant provincial laws. Return policies on unopened merchandise are not backed by law.
Yes, but my example that while return policies and defective merchandise policies have minimum requirements by law, retailers can offer what is beyond what is required by law.
If a retailer offers something at the time of purchase, it can't simply be revoked later.
A second example would be if I own a car dealership. I have a big banner that says "One year's worth of weekly on-site car washings with the sale of a new car" in the dealership. If I sell cars when that banner's up, I can't simply cancel that promotion and stop washing the cars of people that bought from me. If I cancel the promotion, I still have to honour it for the people who have already bought the car.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jan 16, 2011
3930 posts
3479 upvotes
The NORTH
'Temporary' right.... I'll believe it when I see it. These changes will be here to stay for the final sale items.

Top