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Newegg Black Friday

G.SKILL Trident Z Neo Series 32GB (2 x 16GB) DDR4 3600 CL14 Samsung B-die $320

  • Last Updated:
  • Nov 30th, 2021 5:47 pm
[OP]
Newbie
Nov 26, 2015
24 posts
25 upvotes
Richmond Hill, ON

[Newegg] [Black Friday] G.SKILL Trident Z Neo Series 32GB (2 x 16GB) DDR4 3600 CL14 Samsung B-die $320

Don't know how hot this deal is but if anyone is looking for some good DDR4 memory this deal is still up. Speed and latency seem really good, some of the faster ram available. I was thinking about buying two 16GB sets, but this ends up being the same price for faster RAM compared to deals on 16GB kits.

Here's a link to PC part picker, their chart shows it's pretty close to the all time low. It's slightly more expensive than newegg.com if you compare exchange rates. But it's still shipping from Canada so newegg isn't gouging you on shipping as much here.

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/tm6qqs ... 14d-32gtzn

Here's a b-die list with the part number for the product. It seems new so there isn't that many reviews or information for it.

https://www.hardwareluxx.de/community/t ... 1.1161530/
17 replies
[OP]
Newbie
Nov 26, 2015
24 posts
25 upvotes
Richmond Hill, ON
The timings on that one are 16-19-19-39 which should be CL16

Which makes it a bit "slower".

It just means it's probably not b-die and it won't overclock as well. I am sure the cheaper price is worth it unless you are someone with OCD who wants to mess with their computer to make it go slightly faster.

Edit: I am that dumb OCD person.
Deal Addict
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Dec 23, 2015
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Newmarket, ON
Thanks for the correction guys, I only knew about 3200 vs 3600 but didn't know about timings.
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Apr 17, 2005
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Kitchener
Does timing matter much for Intel CPU? For like 11400 or upcoming 12400.
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Sr. Member
Dec 26, 2011
721 posts
311 upvotes
Thundercloud wrote: Does timing matter much for Intel CPU? For like 11400 or upcoming 12400.
Practically speaking if you're thinking about the paying the premium on this you should have an i9, or at the very least an i7 Alder Lake CPU. It doesn't make sense to look for savings by dropping all the way down to a lower i5 only to then pay a huge premium for the tighter timings on these.
[OP]
Newbie
Nov 26, 2015
24 posts
25 upvotes
Richmond Hill, ON
It does matter for Alder Lake the 12XXX CPUs. It's not a huge difference, but yes. Mostly people have been comparing it against DDR5 right now, because that's the hot new thing. But a fast DDR4 kit can get 5% performance increase over a DDR5 kit right now, especially if you overclock it.

Honestly this is only important if you are buying the current intel CPU. Because DDR5 is sold out everywhere, and it doesn't perform as well as DDR4 right now because of increase in latency. In two years or so DDR5 will overtake DDR4 in overall performance and by then there will be two new generations of Intel chips out or something.

I've been kind of following this thread for this info https://www.overclock.net/threads/offic ... k.1794799/
arandomguy wrote: Practically speaking if you're thinking about the paying the premium on this you should have an i9, or at the very least an i7 Alder Lake CPU. It doesn't make sense to look for savings by dropping all the way down to a lower i5 only to then pay a huge premium for the tighter timings on these.
I think it depends a bit on what you want to do. The difference between i5 and i9 is very small in games and other things that don't max out CPU usage. Also i9 runs extremely hot, you can't use an air cooler with it. If you are making a small PC with an air cooler, or a smaller cooler then i5 might be worth it because the single thread performance is still great, it will still be overkill for a lot of games, but it won't be overheating all the time because it draws a lot less power and generates less heat.
Sr. Member
Dec 26, 2011
721 posts
311 upvotes
Lostconfused wrote: I think it depends a bit on what you want to do. The difference between i5 and i9 is very small in games and other things that don't max out CPU usage. Also i9 runs extremely hot, you can't use an air cooler with it. If you are making a small PC with an air cooler, or a smaller cooler then i5 might be worth it because the single thread performance is still great, it will still be overkill for a lot of games, but it won't be overheating all the time because it draws a lot less power and generates less heat.
The difference between 3600C14 vs 3600C16 (I'm using this since another poster gave an example of this costing over $100 less) is also going to very small in the same scenarios.

The larger available L3 cache as you go up the line also factors into the same scenarios in which the slightly lower latency memory would benefit. This is an example of the scaling in gaming just form the 12600k to 12900k, keep in mind the 12400 would score even lower - https://cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.net/Q4xP9 ... 0.png.webp

Not to mention I'm not even sure what specific usage scenario exist in which you're fine with an i5-12400 (not even 12600k) yet require both both 32 GB of ram and will benefit from the diminishing returns on memory latency to point of willing to pay more for it than the cost of going up to a 12600k or better.

As for power consumption we can look at two scenarios. If it's a work load similar to gaming there is no way any of these CPUs are going to unmanageable on even "budget" air cooling. Even the 12900k at worst might draw in the low 100's W in terms of power consumption.

The tests you commonly see that use applications like Blender are only representative of those types of workloads. I can concede that the higher end CPUs do have much more hard to manage power draws in those type of workloads however there are some caveats here -

1) Power limits are configurable

2) The performance difference in those workloads tend to scale very well with core count which the i7 and i9 (and 12600k) provide.

3) Because of the above and how frequency to power scaling works, the higher core count CPUs would actually end up more efficient if limited to the same power limits.
[OP]
Newbie
Nov 26, 2015
24 posts
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Richmond Hill, ON
Sure I agree for the most part.

But going by that chart i9 scaling is awful and not worth the price, the i7 with DDR4 RAM is almost as fast and would probably be cheaper. Not having to deal with power and heat issues is just another benefit.

Performance still scales with RAM speed, and it's up to you to decide what you want to spend your money on and what your budget is.
Newbie
Apr 22, 2015
66 posts
126 upvotes
Winnipeg, MB
I own the Ryzen 7 5800x cpu and from the research I've down, faster DDR4 ram with tighter timings matters very little for the Ryzen 5000 series CPUs. Only under CPU bottleneck conditions (like gaming at 1080p with a RTX 3080) would you even detect improvements going from DDR4 3600 CL18 to CL16/CL14, and the improvements would likely be minuscule. With Ryzen 5000, what would make a bigger difference is having DUAL RANK memory configuration providing a 3-5% performance uplift depending on circumstance. So you're better off just getting a cheaper 4x8GB kit at 3600mhz CL18/16, at least with the Ryzen 5000 series CPUs. I can't speak for Intel or lower gen Ryzen CPUs because I haven't done any research on those CPUs. But if you are a Ryzen 5000 CPU owner, I would have to say this CL14 ram kit is a waste of money.

This guy here explains it in more detail:
Sr. Member
Nov 28, 2017
791 posts
799 upvotes
Lostconfused wrote: I think it depends a bit on what you want to do. The difference between i5 and i9 is very small in games and other things that don't max out CPU usage. Also i9 runs extremely hot, you can't use an air cooler with it. If you are making a small PC with an air cooler, or a smaller cooler then i5 might be worth it because the single thread performance is still great, it will still be overkill for a lot of games, but it won't be overheating all the time because it draws a lot less power and generates less heat.
You sort of missed the point.

Yes, i5 and i9 difference will not matter much in many games. But neither will really top end memory.

The point is that it is not really worth paying a premium on this unless you are fairly price insensitive and want to really max out performance, in which case you are likely getting a flagship CPU and pricey cooling solution, too.
[OP]
Newbie
Nov 26, 2015
24 posts
25 upvotes
Richmond Hill, ON
jasonxtc wrote: what would make a bigger difference is having DUAL RANK memory configuration
Both kits posted are dual rank. The cheaper one is Hynix C-Die and the more expensive one is Samsung B-Die.

The samsung tax is expected.

Edit: I was wrong, yeah as mentioned bellow Micron E-die is the one to go with if you don't want to deal with the b-die markup.
Last edited by Lostconfused on Nov 30th, 2021 12:44 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Jr. Member
Dec 15, 2019
187 posts
183 upvotes
jasonxtc wrote: I own the Ryzen 7 5800x cpu and from the research I've down, faster DDR4 ram with tighter timings matters very little for the Ryzen 5000 series CPUs. Only under CPU bottleneck conditions (like gaming at 1080p with a RTX 3080) would you even detect improvements going from DDR4 3600 CL18 to CL16/CL14, and the improvements would likely be minuscule. With Ryzen 5000, what would make a bigger difference is having DUAL RANK memory configuration providing a 3-5% performance uplift depending on circumstance. So you're better off just getting a cheaper 4x8GB kit at 3600mhz CL18/16, at least with the Ryzen 5000 series CPUs. I can't speak for Intel or lower gen Ryzen CPUs because I haven't done any research on those CPUs. But if you are a Ryzen 5000 CPU owner, I would have to say this CL14 ram kit is a waste of money.

This guy here explains it in more detail:
This is great insight. Currently building a 5600x system so this is quite useful and relevant for me. Thanks!
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Dec 26, 2010
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Markham
Pretty good deal, but very niche and targets only a handful of people here I'd imagine.

For those with Ryzen systems, you may as well pick up the Crucial Ballistix Micron E die kits which are much cheaper and scale relatively similar in tuning. Only second to Samsung B-die.
This deal is more so targetted to Alderlake people trying to min-max Gear 1 tune by underclocking the frequency and tightening the timings due to the IMC design. Good alternative to the very pricey DDR5.
Jr. Member
Aug 19, 2011
112 posts
104 upvotes
Vancouver
Expliciate wrote: This deal is more so targetted to Alderlake people trying to min-max Gear 1 tune by underclocking the frequency and tightening the timings due to the IMC design. Good alternative to the very pricey DDR5.
Agreed. I have an older TridentZ 3200 CL14 B-Die kit which I re-used with Alder Lake, running it 24/7 at 4000 MT/s in Gear 1 at 16-18-18-38: https://imgur.com/a/CqANWhM
I'm guessing this kit can be pushed to tighter timings, since it's a newer and better bin.

Here's another interesting B-Die option: https://www.newegg.ca/g-skill-32gb-288- ... 6820374149
Slightly more expensive, but comes with a very respectable 4000 MT/s 16-16-16-36. You would only need to tighten tRFC and some tertiary timings, but no need to roll the dice on primaries and frequency.
[OP]
Newbie
Nov 26, 2015
24 posts
25 upvotes
Richmond Hill, ON
That Ripjaws one does look interesting.

It's also running at a lower 1.40V

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