Food & Drink

No Name butter any good?

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  • Nov 16th, 2020 6:32 pm
[OP]
Jr. Member
Aug 29, 2017
152 posts
36 upvotes
Toronto

No Name butter any good?

Has anyone tried No Name butter lately? How does it compare to Neilson's butter? I use butter mainly for toast and pancake.

Thanks.
45 replies
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Nov 4, 2008
6707 posts
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Richmond Hill
no name butter is fine in my books, and on my toast, and in my baking
When given enough time, all threads on RFD can and will go off on a tangent.
Deal Fanatic
Sep 16, 2004
9608 posts
1860 upvotes
Toronto
I have not tried the No Name butter but have tried the No Name old cheddar cheese and it was very salty.
PC butter IMO is expensive and not very good.
Neilson salted butter was also very salty.
I only buy Gay Lea or Lactantia salted butter on sale and they are just right IMO.
Moderator
May 28, 2012
11326 posts
3542 upvotes
Saskatoon
We go through quite a bit of butter for baking and cooking so I buy extra when it's on sale and freeze it. I haven't had any issues with generic brands (but I'm also not spreading it on bread/toast either). There's not that much they can do to screw up butter...excess salt might be one thing, and maybe the milk source can affect flavour too. Cheesemaking requires a lot more skill (no name/generic brands of cheese is just nasty all around, imo).
Deal Addict
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Feb 9, 2007
2703 posts
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Whitby
Check out the establishment number on it. Compare to others beside it and you have the manufacturer - and the exact same butter. Depending on where in Canada you are, it is made by several different manufacturers. Some use a batch process (much better flavour IMHO) and some are continuous.
It's pronounced Throat Wobbler Mangrove
Sr. Member
Jul 15, 2006
956 posts
110 upvotes
Mississauga, ON
We sometimes get unsalted NN butter. It seems perfectly fine taste wise.
Sr. Member
Sep 14, 2012
826 posts
987 upvotes
Toronto
redflagcat wrote: Has anyone tried No Name butter lately? How does it compare to Neilson's butter? I use butter mainly for toast and pancake.

Thanks.
Why wouldn't you buy it once to try it rather than rely on strangers to tell you about the taste. I mean, it's not really a budget buster one way or the other.
Deal Addict
May 30, 2010
1651 posts
1060 upvotes
raymondly wrote: Check out the establishment number on it. Compare to others beside it and you have the manufacturer - and the exact same butter. Depending on where in Canada you are, it is made by several different manufacturers. Some use a batch process (much better flavour IMHO) and some are continuous.
I have tried looking, where and what does the number look like?
Deal Addict
May 30, 2010
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ichibansan wrote: Why wouldn't you buy it once to try it rather than rely on strangers to tell you about the taste. I mean, it's not really a budget buster one way or the other.
What's the harm in asking, and potentially even learn a thing or two about butter or establishment numbers? On the other hand, why bother to respond, if all you are doing is admonish the OP for a simple question?

Felling a little itchy ban san? Today?

Oh and did you know that Canadian butter must contain a minimum of 80% butterfat to be called butter? And most manufacturers stick to that, for costs but also for consistency reasons so all regular butters can be used interchangeably in most recipes. In most of Europe, the minimum is 82% and can go as high as 84%, that little difference can make or break a recipe.
Penalty Box
Jun 24, 2015
4955 posts
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the no name butter or store brand butter all comes from the same factory as the brand name butter. I think the brand name butter is GAY Lea or something like that? so if that case the store brand or no name should also be GAY Lea but with a different wrapper/packaging
Hi
Deal Addict
Mar 11, 2004
4073 posts
1952 upvotes
Mississauga
Often goes on sale for $2 each. Buy one and compare to anything else you were / are using. If you can tell the difference be it for better or worse, there is your answer and you only wasted $2 or you could be saving a lot if you buy Kerrygold butter.
Deal Fanatic
Aug 29, 2011
6431 posts
3448 upvotes
Mississauga
GoodFellaz wrote: the no name butter or store brand butter all comes from the same factory as the brand name butter.
That is true but most of the time no-name/generic brands of foods don't use the same quality of formulation ingredients as the name brand. People buying no-name products accept that in exchange for a cheaper price.
Penalty Box
Jun 24, 2015
4955 posts
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big deal, basic butter is just fine, why the heck would someone want to pay $6-7 for a stick of "Premium" butter when the basic one is just as good? most people wont notice the difference in taste for the extra 3-4 bucks you pay. Butter should be just that, buter, nothing else, no premium, no extravagant butter, just plain ol butter
Hi
Deal Addict
Mar 11, 2004
4073 posts
1952 upvotes
Mississauga
GoodFellaz wrote: big deal, basic butter is just fine, why the heck would someone want to pay $6-7 for a stick of "Premium" butter when the basic one is just as good? most people wont notice the difference in taste for the extra 3-4 bucks you pay. Butter should be just that, buter, nothing else, no premium, no extravagant butter, just plain ol butter
What if it says its natural, 100% from cow's milk, and has pictures of happy cows on sunny pasture? I bet thats worse the extra cost.
And if you throw on there non-gmo, gluten free and keto approved........ tripple that price. ;)
Deal Fanatic
Jul 7, 2017
6401 posts
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SW corner of the cou…
There can be a few qualitative differences (and whether you believe or not might depend if you think or dont think that everything is a commodity).

One of the main one is whether the cows are fed grass or hay. Ours require hay for quite a few months of the year while some places like New Zealand can feed their cows grass all year. There is supposed to be a difference in taste, not that I have ever had the privilege to compare different products. It is said that cheese in Switzerland/eastern France have a different taste depending on when and where the cows were feeding when milked (such as feeding on alpine meadows).

The second difference is breed of cow. Most of the dairy cattle in countries that don't have a long tradition of dairy farming use Holsteins because they're the most productive dairy cow. Other countries, France as an example, use cow breeds that have been bred for local use for centuries if not longer. The milk can be very different (hence the premium for some) as a result. Case in point, Channel Island cows.

All that said, I did buy 2 lbs of NN unsalted butter on the weekend (we never get anything close to $3.00/lb out west).
I smile when I see container ships sailing past my house laden with stuff made in China
Sr. Member
Apr 12, 2005
956 posts
193 upvotes
IMO there can be a lot of difference b/w butter.

Pick up a LB of Stirling butter if you have access and take the Pepsi challenge with NN butter and a fresh baguette

https://stirlingcreamery.com/products/stirling-butters/

If you have no preference by all means by the NN or whatever is lowest price.

You can make the same argument about a lot of food products (wine, olive oil, canned tomatoes, cheese. the list is endless). Some people find the difference negligible and some people are willing to pay the price for something that tastes better to them

Another great example to me is milk. The micro filter milks 100% taste better to me. If it doesnt to you then dont waste your $$

I dont think theres a "right" answer here but I also think its somewhat disingenuous to suggest there is no difference
Member
Mar 22, 2020
382 posts
247 upvotes
GoodFellaz wrote: the no name butter or store brand butter all comes from the same factory as the brand name butter. I think the brand name butter is GAY Lea or something like that? so if that case the store brand or no name should also be GAY Lea but with a different wrapper/packaging
Where did you get this info? I’m interested in learning more about this.
Deal Fanatic
Jul 7, 2017
6401 posts
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SW corner of the cou…
Canoes4Fun wrote: Where did you get this info? I’m interested in learning more about this.
Depends on where you are. Out west, there seem to be only two large dairies. Saputo which bought the Dairyland brand, Parmalat (Beatrice, Lactantia) and Agropur which as grown its co-op to include Lucerne (former Safeway inhouse brand/supplier?), Island Farm and Natrel. In all likelihood, all private label dairy products come from one of these.

I imagine the butter could come from any of the above out est, and back east or wherever, probably the lowest bidder that can supply and may change periodically.

The only way I can figure it to check where and how the BB date and line code is printed. Might be the only way to tell where it came from.
I smile when I see container ships sailing past my house laden with stuff made in China
Deal Guru
Sep 2, 2008
11823 posts
1654 upvotes
Just get it from Costco, always cheap. At the regular supermarkets, especially Loblaws, butter is ridiculously expensive IMO.

I think right now the Costco price has been around 4.xx for the last few months and that's much higher than it usually is. For the last few years it's always been around $3 more or less.

Quality butter, like high end butter that is hard to find in Canada, really does taste better than the normal stuff though. I haven't tried no name but I bet it would taste different but good enough for most people who don't care so much.

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