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[OP]
Member
Jan 21, 2007
452 posts
214 upvotes
Toronto

No Name MBAs

I’ve been reading a lot into MBAs as I’m just finishing up my degree (part-time) and have been in my industry for 10+ years now. I was wondering for those who hire how you view a no-name MBA? I have been looking into Quantic as it’s cheap (alternative is Athabasca since I’m finishing my undergrad there). I understand it’s not Schulich/Ivey (but I’m not going into IB/consulting). Looking for some candid opinions to see if this even worth pursuing.
47 replies
Sr. Member
Jun 3, 2006
701 posts
102 upvotes
Markham
I work at a big 5 bank, and from my standpoint, an MBA from a school like Ivey/Schulich is meh. One from a no name university wouldn't mean anything to me whatsoever. That said, I'm not a big believer in post grad education for "non-specialized" functions. I only think that they're worthwhile for areas like doctors, dentists, etc where it's critical to do their job. If you're doing it for personal reasons (ie. learning, personal growth, etc), go for it. If you're doing it to further your career, the ROI on it is likely going to be negative.
Deal Addict
Apr 7, 2011
1858 posts
403 upvotes
I look at it like this - first tier which is important for some people , second tier, Canadian schools I've heard of like U of O or equivalent, third tier which are schools I've never heard of.

If it's a Canadian school I've never heard of I'd possibly discount it.

To me an MBA should be for someone with some experience OR someone that is switching disciplines like engineering to business. B Comm to MBA never made any sense to me.
Deal Addict
Sep 20, 2014
1391 posts
596 upvotes
Toronto, ON, CA
No-name MBA: do not do lol, it may actually make you look bad or dilute your brand kinda.
Canadian MBA: do it if you can on the cheap, it has value despite what the above OP said. It's a differentiator, not a transformation.
US MBA: do it if you can and have the money, it's very expensive but is generally transformational lol.
Sr. Member
Jan 8, 2009
711 posts
711 upvotes
VanillaIce1992 wrote: How good is the MBA full time at Laurier?
Depends on your background. If you have an Engineering undergrad, then any accredited MBA would be good. Laurier would work.

If you are a Canadian BBA/BCom grad, then WLU wouldn't add much. You need the brand name (Ivey, Rotman), or even better (Harvard / Stanford, or second tier such as Notre Dame) to make taking a MBA worth your while.
Sr. Member
Sep 28, 2013
675 posts
377 upvotes
An MBA is about branding as much as anything else, imo. You only get to do an MBA once, so don't skimp if you are going to do it. If an MBA is not going to help you get into a career or accelerate your current one, than don't waste your time. Do a targeted degree in your chosen area if you feel you need further education.
Deal Addict
Feb 4, 2010
4173 posts
2949 upvotes
The responses in this thread are good reflection of how superficial society is and that is why you'll also get degrees that will take advantage of or cater to that superficiality. I make you a bet most people don't even know the curriculum of the MBAs they feel they're qualified to assess. And honestly, if someone Joe-Blow is going to judge someone based on where they got their MBA from, I rather not work for someone like that - telltale signs of a bad manager. I these people have the ability to figure out good candidate from a bad one, let alone a bad MBA from a good one.

Problem is that most just blindly follow current trends thinking they're making themselves unique or marketable without a clue. MBAs are a dime a dozen, everyone and their grandmothers are getting them. It's not so much as where you get it from, but what you do with it paired with your experience and skillsets. First priority should be work experience and skills development, not jumping from one degree to another. Depending one's career trajectory, you may want to consider getting a masters that's not an MBA. In many cases, certifications or post-grad diplomas might be a better option. Think outside the proverbial box.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 16, 2015
2521 posts
2191 upvotes
Canada
At least classroom MBAs teaches you how to write and speak effectively which most engineers can’t
To the moon
Member
Jun 18, 2020
305 posts
256 upvotes
Wonder by time this thread is done how many will say MBAs are given out like nothing and everyone has them and it doesnt differentiate you. Can't throw a rock without hitting one!

Prob is, if everyone has one and you don't...you risk being left out. You fall behind by staying static. Obviously your other experience might one day trump someone's mba. But it still is a nice piece to your career puzzle.

You named 3 programs, 2 are very well regarded Ontario programs and one is not. What about the dozens of programs in the middle?

I'm sure there will be many replies here that offer both sides. It's the internet. For all you know, they have an agenda or view of the world shaped by their success or failure to get an mba. Or success or failure in a career. My advice, talk to people in the industry to want to be in. Network your connections. Find people, ideally directors and up, but even senior managers if that's who you find. Ask them how many collegues have MBAs. Ask them if they are glad they have it to advance their career, or if they worry not having it will hold them back. Notice I am not saying ask what they learned or if they use the knowledge. While I feel the learning is important and valuable, what's maybe just as important is its a box to check on the way up. If you must, just scour LinkedIn. Look at profiles in industry. See what degrees they seem to have acquired.

I know a few middle tier program grads, in operations at big 5 banks (so no mbb, no IB etc). They have the credential, and it's one less thing to worry about when their resume is being compared to 20 others for a position.

The thing about mid tier programs, must less $. Easier roi. Often shorter timelines. I'd give them a look. I don't have an mba, FYI. But spouse does. Didn't lead to some amazing job post grad. But did get cited as a reason for landing the next role after. And it is something collegues mention as being nice to have completed so early (done right after bcomm). But again, I'm just someone on the internet so find people, talk to people.
Member
Oct 5, 2019
231 posts
224 upvotes
Aren’t 2 of the main values of an MBA the network and campus recruiting? For both of those seems like name recognition is important since 1) that’s where top tier companies go to recruit and 2) that’s where top tier people go to get their MBAs. You don’t hear Goldman for example going to recruit at some second or third tier MBA program.

May not be fair since these less well known MBA programs can provide as good or better education, but that’s the world we live in.
Deal Addict
Jul 13, 2009
4580 posts
2687 upvotes
Know what you want out of a MBA before choosing a MBA and from where.

I've seen duds from top MBA schools and I've seen stars from lesser named MBA schools. Big perk of top schools is networking, brand recognition, best profs in the country and access to opportunities.

Do not assume the MBA will be your golden ticket to double your salary, automatic management entry and be set for life. If you don't know why exactly you want a MBA, don't do it. Goal setting is an important skill to have prior to grad school
Member
User avatar
Nov 30, 2007
254 posts
89 upvotes
I find no-name MBAs are pushed with sales-like tactics. I considered a part-time MBA while working a few years ago and sat in on a few seminars for online oriented ones and was not impressed. Now I get constant emails from them in my spam box reminding me of registration dates and how easy the application process is. They are clearly profit before people.
Member
Aug 15, 2018
240 posts
79 upvotes
bhrm wrote: Do not assume the MBA will be your golden ticket to double your salary, automatic management entry and be set for life. If you don't know why exactly you want a MBA, don't do it. Goal setting is an important skill to have prior to grad school
To be honest I've worked in HR for years and can't think of one time a candidate was preferred to another because he had an MBA, even for senior management roles. I'm all for more education (I'm still going to school in my thirties) but I agree with you, people should manage their expectations.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Dec 8, 2007
5084 posts
1260 upvotes
Top Tier: Ivey, Rotman, Schulich.
Mid Tier: Queens, McGill
Bottom Tier: McMaster, Laurier
Basement Tier: idk Ryerson? Brock?
Mark77 wrote:"All aspiring students should go into the financial services - engineering is, and always has been, a poor choice for our brightest minds ... and TodayHello is my Hero ..."
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Sr. Member
User avatar
Jul 29, 2007
664 posts
363 upvotes
North America
Hmm, we have members here who joined in 2006 and 2007, interesting... anyways, OP, how much are you looking at spending for your MBA? No name MBA is alright, what I mean by that is, if it's a small to medium sized company you're applying to for future jobs, it won't really matter who you go with. For the larger companies or blue chip, top 500 employers, or public agencies, it may be advantageous to get a better known school. Have you looked at the online MBA's or similar degrees? You don't really need to go for an MBA, there are MAOL or similar degrees. Are you looking for schools with programmatic/secondary accreditation?
Thank you RFD community for helping me with spending money!
Member
Apr 25, 2019
263 posts
110 upvotes
lovethesales wrote: I’ve been reading a lot into MBAs as I’m just finishing up my degree (part-time) and have been in my industry for 10+ years now. I was wondering for those who hire how you view a no-name MBA? I have been looking into Quantic as it’s cheap (alternative is Athabasca since I’m finishing my undergrad there). I understand it’s not Schulich/Ivey (but I’m not going into IB/consulting). Looking for some candid opinions to see if this even worth pursuing.
What do you want to do with an MBA?
If you live in Canada, a real estate agent course from Humber college will give you better ROI than an MBA .
Deal Addict
Jul 13, 2009
4580 posts
2687 upvotes
TodayHello wrote: Top Tier: Ivey, Rotman, Schulich.
Mid Tier: Queens, McGill
Bottom Tier: McMaster, Laurier
Basement Tier: idk Ryerson? Brock?
Ryerson and Brock are not Basement Tier. Basement Tier would be a school that's barely accredited (or questionably), no notable professors with real world working experience, and shoddy website.

Ryerson has great programs that they intertwine with technology management, great professors with real world experience and it's a school in a major city for better in-class experience. Brock has an excellent accounting program, because not everyone goes to Waterloo or U of T, and it's a fine school with great alumni. Montreal has awesome MBA schools as well, McGill, HEC Montreal, Concordia, and being in a fully bilingual city gives a different life experience.

Canada thankfully (but not immune to) does have a pay to play system for university education. We don't have ivy league level tuition costs that requires taking out 3 mortgages and kidney, but we still have some of the world's best schools.
Sr. Member
Sep 28, 2013
675 posts
377 upvotes
dentonic88 wrote: What do you want to do with an MBA?
If you live in Canada, a real estate agent course from Humber college will give you better ROI than an MBA .
wow, such pithy insight. there's absolutely no nuance to the discussion, thank you for cutting straight to the truth.
Sr. Member
User avatar
Jul 29, 2007
664 posts
363 upvotes
North America
Update question: Have you thought about going for an online degree from a US institution instead? Some are cheaper/easier/faster to finish than the traditional Canadian University. Since you already have a degree from a Local Canadian institution, you can ladder that onto a program from another province or try one from the US/UK. In regards to the "programmatic / secondary" accreditation, I was referring to - AACSB, ACBSP, dual or triple accreditation, and/or something else...

Grr... And what happened to my earlier post - it's missing a word... it should have read - Hmm, we have members here who joined in 2006 and 2007, interesting *answers*...
Thank you RFD community for helping me with spending money!

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