Food & Drink

Non stick frying pans - warranties

  • Last Updated:
  • May 22nd, 2021 7:06 pm
[OP]
Sr. Member
Feb 17, 2005
961 posts
292 upvotes

Non stick frying pans - warranties

Hi - looking at some non stick pans (stainless steel for eggs requires a bit too much butter and oil for it not to stick). Looking at ikea’s 365+ stuff with a 3 year warranty and then Canadian tire has a bunch of stuff (heritage, paderno, etc) with a 3 year warranty too. Does anyone have experience with these warranties?

If a year later the pan loses its non stick properties, can I just take it back? IKEA’s website says yes but there’s not really much details on Canadian tires website. I’m not worried about it warping, but rather the non stick part. Haven’t had much luck with non stick pans in the past. Cast iron is too heavy and it’s somewhere at the back/ bottom of our cupboards.

Thanks for the feedback!
23 replies
Newbie
Feb 4, 2018
80 posts
77 upvotes
Toronto
porkchopbread wrote: Hi - looking at some non stick pans (stainless steel for eggs requires a bit too much butter and oil for it not to stick). Looking at ikea’s 365+ stuff with a 3 year warranty and then Canadian tire has a bunch of stuff (heritage, paderno, etc) with a 3 year warranty too. Does anyone have experience with these warranties?

If a year later the pan loses its non stick properties, can I just take it back? IKEA’s website says yes but there’s not really much details on Canadian tires website. I’m not worried about it warping, but rather the non stick part. Haven’t had much luck with non stick pans in the past. Cast iron is too heavy and it’s somewhere at the back/ bottom of our cupboards.

Thanks for the feedback!
I am not familiar with the brands of non-stick pans that you referenced in your post. However, as a suggestion, you may wish to look at the All-Clad line of pans with non-stick interior. I bought their D5 (8" pan size) a few years ago. I use it specifically for egg dishes: scrambled/fried, omelettes, tortilla espanola. It performs beautifully: excellent release, easy cleanup. All-Clad's web site mentions their "limited lifetime warranty" , you could inquire about any limitations/caveats on the non-stick component. The D5 is only 8" (perfect for my purposes) but other sizes are available.

These pans are not inexpensive, but thus far, mine has been great.
Last edited by ElaineB852835 on Apr 28th, 2021 5:15 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Sep 1, 2005
13751 posts
8464 upvotes
Markham
Depending on how often you use them and what you use em for...the cheapest T-Fals work fine. Costco sells a 3 pack of different sizes for under $30 which is pretty good IMO. After they lose performance, just replace them. Stick to using these pans only when you really need non-stick. Otherwise use a different non non-stick pan.

The Heritage Rock ones are supposed to be decent but I've never tried em.

All Clad non-stick. Have one and it's not as non-sticky as my T-fal but it's still OK.
We're all bozos on the bus until we find a way to express ourselves...

Failure is always an option...just not the preferred one!
Deal Expert
Feb 7, 2017
17051 posts
14435 upvotes
Eastern Ontario
gr8dlr wrote: Depending on how often you use them and what you use em for...the cheapest T-Fals work fine. Costco sells a 3 pack of different sizes for under $30 which is pretty good IMO. After they lose performance, just replace them. Stick to using these pans only when you really need non-stick. Otherwise use a different non non-stick pan.

The Heritage Rock ones are supposed to be decent but I've never tried em.

All Clad non-stick. Have one and it's not as non-sticky as my T-fal but it's still OK.
Another vote for the T-Fal trio from Costco

If you watch a lot of cooking shows, you’ll quickly figure out that T-Fal (with its distinctive Red T & Circle) is the choice of many pro chefs when it comes to non stick frypans

Other than that ... only other skillets you might want / need are some Cast Iron ones, for bigger jobs than just eggs (perfect for Pork Chops, Fried Chicken etc) a properly cared for / maintained set of cast iron skillets will build up a natural non stick surface ... and last a life time ... infact your grandkids will probably inherit them. We added 2 such pans by Lodge to our pots & pan inventory ... and am very happy. We also got them on a Costco deal (albeit in the USA)

Back to chemical non stick ... this stuff is wonderful ... but it’s still a chemical that can be attributed to cancer ... so only use non metal utensils ... and hand wash preferably with a plastic scrubber to get off any bad bits when needed. And if it’s starting to show scratches / peeling or heavy wear & tear on that chemical non stick surface ... then its time to chuck em out & replace.

* EDIT / ADD - Time to haul out your Cast Iron from hiding ... it truly is wonderous stuff. But ya got to use it. As it only gets better over time
Deal Addict
May 19, 2003
2834 posts
855 upvotes
The primary reason non stick starts sticking is because you heated it too high and the oil has become carbonized. It's very easy to overheat a pan if you're not using a infrared thermometer to check.
Also lots of oils have low smoke points. I'm pretty careful with mine and after a while they'll still start becoming sticky. Easy way to restore it, is to use oven cleaner to strip the stuck on grease and oil.
Oven cleaner won't hurt the non stick coating, it's not organic. Get yourself an infrared thermometer and don't let your non stick go over 500F.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Feb 17, 2005
961 posts
292 upvotes
Than you all. Some good tips, especially the oven cleaner one.

I love my stainless steel pan. It’s got a bit of heft but still manageable where my wife doesn’t complain too much. The cast iron was too heavy for her and honest I thought it was too heavy as well - that’s why it doesn’t get used much.

Tofu, eggs, French toast etc. definitely not things I cook everyday. But a few times a week. I like meat fond but French toast fond isn’t very useful. So a cheap ish non stick is ideal. I’ll look at tfal. I see Canadian tire has a $15 on sale this weekend. Although it just has a one year warranty. The ikea one costs $30 but has 5 years and calls out free of the dangerous chemicals
Deal Guru
User avatar
Sep 1, 2005
13751 posts
8464 upvotes
Markham
shutterbug wrote: The primary reason non stick starts sticking is because you heated it too high and the oil has become carbonized. It's very easy to overheat a pan if you're not using a infrared thermometer to check.
Also lots of oils have low smoke points. I'm pretty careful with mine and after a while they'll still start becoming sticky. Easy way to restore it, is to use oven cleaner to strip the stuck on grease and oil.
Oven cleaner won't hurt the non stick coating, it's not organic. Get yourself an infrared thermometer and don't let your non stick go over 500F.
500F is really too hot IMO. I think 350 to 400 is the highest you should go if you want to preserve the coatings. Not all pans are equal.
We're all bozos on the bus until we find a way to express ourselves...

Failure is always an option...just not the preferred one!
Deal Addict
User avatar
Nov 15, 2020
1386 posts
915 upvotes
The maximum temperature of telflon is 550F. Going higher means it starts to emit chemicals that you dont want near pets, or to breathe in.
Deal Expert
Feb 7, 2017
17051 posts
14435 upvotes
Eastern Ontario
ON SALE NOW @ Costco
3 Skillet Set from T-Fal

UNTIL MAY 2nd, 2021


Just noticed this now ...

$ 6 OFF

On Line = $ 29.79
In Store = $ 23.99 **

** Great deal if you happen to live in a Province that currently isn’t in Lockdown / Essentials only like Ontario
Deal Guru
User avatar
Sep 1, 2005
13751 posts
8464 upvotes
Markham
evilYoda wrote: The maximum temperature of telflon is 550F. Going higher means it starts to emit chemicals that you dont want near pets, or to breathe in.
I can load food on my pan around 350-400 [temp taken with infared temperature gun] which is the same temp I typically bake at...can't imagine it hitting 500-550F! That's scorching baking bread hot.
We're all bozos on the bus until we find a way to express ourselves...

Failure is always an option...just not the preferred one!
Deal Addict
May 19, 2003
2834 posts
855 upvotes
gr8dlr wrote: I can load food on my pan around 350-400 [temp taken with infared temperature gun] which is the same temp I typically bake at...can't imagine it hitting 500-550F! That's scorching baking bread hot.
Once you put food in the pan, it'll easily drop 100F as the thermal energy in the pan is absorbed by the food. You definitely need more than 400F if you want to sear. 500F is a good buffer from 550F.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Sep 1, 2005
13751 posts
8464 upvotes
Markham
shutterbug wrote: Once you put food in the pan, it'll easily drop 100F as the thermal energy in the pan is absorbed by the food. You definitely need more than 400F if you want to sear. 500F is a good buffer from 550F.
I generally don't sear in my non-stick pans because food doesn't sear as well IMO without a conductor like oil, which if i'm using oil, why use a non-stick. Added to that the pan temp drop is a problem with searing so I generally pull out the heavier cast iron or carbon steel or even stainless pans. Most of my non-sticks are "lighter" in thermal mass.
We're all bozos on the bus until we find a way to express ourselves...

Failure is always an option...just not the preferred one!
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Oct 26, 2002
6292 posts
698 upvotes
BC
The fastest way to lose the non stick in a pan is using it wrong, mostly at higher than recommended heat. So I would bet most places would say it was used incorrectly before they gave you a new pan under warranty.

You do have to use them gently, that will depend on how long they last. They are cheap enough, buy, use, replace when needed. I get anywhere from 2-5 years depending on quality. If I want to sear I use ss or cast iron.
That's my 2cents worth
Newbie
User avatar
Apr 8, 2021
55 posts
44 upvotes
Montreal
Carbon steel, nothing else.
'2003
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 3, 2010
2375 posts
1018 upvotes
Toronto
Try looking into carbon steel as it's a lighter version of cast iron
Deal Expert
User avatar
Feb 8, 2014
21117 posts
8009 upvotes
Socially Distanced
As mentioned carbon steel seems to be a favourite, its also light unlike cast iron. Though i don't have personal experience with it to impart.
As for non stick you want to make sure you don't overheat it, above about 200C it starts breaking down, and it seems to not break down all at once. I use an IR thermometer (which goes on sale frequently) to keep it under 200C (medium heat only and once it gets above 180C i toss the food in), and i've had one since 2017 which is still working great.
Also don't use anything metal in the pan ever. I use IKEA plastic spatulas. Wood spatulas/turners are also acceptable.

Finally clean it with scrubbers that specifically say they don't scratch nonstick cookware. I use scotchbrite non scratch scrubbers. Ikea scrubbers work well also.
In fact in Rand McNally they wear hats on their feet and hamburgers eat people
Member
Mar 16, 2007
321 posts
146 upvotes
GTA
We use mostly cast iron and carbon steel pans in our house but non stick pan has its place too. It is mainly for low heat cooking and you have to be carefull not to scratch the surface. Use wood or teflon utinsils and wash with soft foam. Most of ours last at least a couple of years and we dont buy expensive ones.
Deal Guru
Dec 11, 2008
10121 posts
1540 upvotes
OP I bought heritage ROCK and within a year I returned it and they gave me a new one in store because Can Tire had a return policy warranty.

Check that out.

I use plastic large spatula if I need to flip something, otherwise I use silicone spatulas for stirring and other things. Never metal.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Aug 3, 2006
4598 posts
1239 upvotes
gr8dlr wrote: Depending on how often you use them and what you use em for...the cheapest T-Fals work fine. After they lose performance, just replace them. Stick to using these pans only when you really need non-stick.
Yep this. There are a lot of reviews out there comparing $20 T-Fal non-stick pans to $50 and $200 competitors. T-Fal always wins. They're always top 1-2 in non-stick performance, low cost and easy to find.

Top