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Notice of apartment entry for a week-long showing period?

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  • Jun 22nd, 2018 3:53 pm
[OP]
Newbie
Jun 18, 2018
1 posts

Notice of apartment entry for a week-long showing period?

Hi. I'm a tenant in Ontario, and my lease ends in more than 2 months from now (I already gave my landlord a termination notice), and my landlord has therefore started showing my apartment to future/potential tenants. For the second time, he gave me a single 24-hours notice for a period of 7 days during which he exercises his right of entry for showing my apartment pretty much anytime during the day. Is that legal? I thought a notice of entry was only for a short period of time (like a day), not an entire week.
Also, can I request to be present when he shows my apartment? He almost always forgets to lock the door, which is a huge safety/privacy concern for me.
Thanks!
23 replies
Deal Expert
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Feb 11, 2007
19655 posts
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GTA
You should be able to find the tenant rights online. They're pretty clear. You might want to get a webcam to record any activity and put a note on your door indicating that. (or just bluff and put a note on the door)
If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.
Deal Guru
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Mar 23, 2008
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Edmonton
Talk to the LTB. They are the judges for things landlord/tenant related. I don't believe what your landlord is doing is allowed.

C
Deal Fanatic
Jun 26, 2009
5195 posts
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GTA
Sooner he finds new tenants - better for you. It's always a hassle with the showings, even if you are selling your own place. I don't think the place needs to be empty, you can be present when they come.
Deal Guru
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Mar 23, 2008
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Edmonton
Oh, and as far as you requesting to be present... I don't believe he's obligated to oblige you on that. I think you CAN be there if you're there when the showing occurs (as in, he can't kick you out), but he's not obligated to work with you and your schedule.

C
Deal Addict
Jun 7, 2008
2140 posts
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Toronto
They just have to make best effort to notify you. They technically can enter without notice to show to prospective tenants now that your lease is ending.
Deal Fanatic
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Nov 13, 2010
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Scarborough
Put a note on the door to remind them to LOCK the door after showing.
Banned
Dec 25, 2017
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Rockwood
tragd wrote: They just have to make best effort to notify you. They technically can enter without notice to show to prospective tenants now that your lease is ending.
I'm glad you don't work for LTB or represent tenants in anyway as your information is false. Just because the lease is ending does not negate the laws.
Deal Addict
Jun 7, 2008
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Toronto
None12 wrote: I'm glad you don't work for LTB or represent tenants in anyway as your information is false. Just because the lease is ending does not negate the laws.
Tell me, what do the laws say?
Deal Addict
Nov 30, 2003
2689 posts
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Nunavut
Jerico wrote: Google, 4 seconds to find this.

http://www.sjto.gov.on.ca/documents/ltb ... 0Unit.html

Not considered reasonable.
Seems very reasonable.

From the link you posted, under section of Entry without Notice. It's very clearly stated
if the landlord and the tenant have agreed the tenancy will be terminated or one of them has given notice of termination to the other, the landlord may enter the unit to show it to prospective tenants between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. and, before entering, the landlord informs or makes a reasonable effort to inform the tenant of the landlord's intention to enter. A landlord must make reasonable efforts, depending upon the facts and circumstances of each case, to give the tenant advance notice in order to permit the tenant to be prepared for entry into the unit by the landlord to show the unit to prospective tenants
Deal Guru
Oct 6, 2007
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Kootenays
Everyone assumes the OP is from the CoTU.
Deal Addict
Jan 18, 2013
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B.C.
reivilo444 wrote: Hi. I'm a tenant in Ontario, and my lease ends in more than 2 months from now (I already gave my landlord a termination notice), and my landlord has therefore started showing my apartment to future/potential tenants. For the second time, he gave me a single 24-hours notice for a period of 7 days during which he exercises his right of entry for showing my apartment pretty much anytime during the day. Is that legal? I thought a notice of entry was only for a short period of time (like a day), not an entire week.
Also, can I request to be present when he shows my apartment? He almost always forgets to lock the door, which is a huge safety/privacy concern for me.
Thanks!
Yes, it is legal. Unless it's earlier than 8am or later than 8pm...
Deal Guru
Jan 25, 2007
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Paris
Eldorado wrote: Seems very reasonable.

From the link you posted, under section of Entry without Notice. It's very clearly stated
A blanket statement of 8-8 all week is not reasonable. An effort should be shown to give advance notice WITH SPECIFICS.
Deal Addict
Nov 30, 2003
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Jerico wrote: A blanket statement of 8-8 all week is not reasonable. An effort should be shown to give advance notice WITH SPECIFICS.
Which is VERY hard to do as a landlord

Again, it's what the law is and OP asked if what the landlord is doing is reasonable, according to what the law states, they are
Deal Guru
Jan 25, 2007
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Paris
Eldorado wrote: Which is VERY hard to do as a landlord

Again, it's what the law is and OP asked if what the landlord is doing is reasonable, according to what the law states, they are
I dont think its a reasonable expectation of privacy to say “Ill be in your house whenever I want without calling or texting first anytime in the next 5 days for anytime within 12 hours”. I believe the expectation is more like “Monday between 2-4” not everyday whenever I want. Thats not notice.

If you worked in a union and the company had to provide notice for you working overtime on weekends 2 weeks in advance, they cant say in January “We might want you to work mandatory OT sometime in 2018”. Or Rogers saying “We install Monday - Saturday from 8am to 8pm. Be home and we will be there sometime”

Edit:
In any case where at least 24 hours written notice has been given to the tenant, the written notice must set out:

the reason for entry;
the date the landlord will enter; and
the time of entry between 8:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m.

Monday-Sunday is not a date, nor is 8-8 a time. I think they are looking for Monday at 2pm.
Deal Addict
Jan 18, 2013
2981 posts
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B.C.
Jerico wrote: I dont think its a reasonable expectation of privacy to say “Ill be in your house whenever I want without calling or texting first anytime in the next 5 days for anytime within 12 hours”. I believe the expectation is more like “Monday between 2-4” not everyday whenever I want. Thats not notice.

If you worked in a union and the company had to provide notice for you working overtime on weekends 2 weeks in advance, they cant say in January “We might want you to work mandatory OT sometime in 2018”. Or Rogers saying “We install Monday - Saturday from 8am to 8pm. Be home and we will be there sometime”

Edit:
In any case where at least 24 hours written notice has been given to the tenant, the written notice must set out:

the reason for entry;
the date the landlord will enter; and
the time of entry between 8:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m.

Monday-Sunday is not a date, nor is 8-8 a time. I think they are looking for Monday at 2pm.
Monday-Sunday is a range of dates and is perfectly acceptable. Annoying but acceptable.

Just because it sucks and is annoying doesn't make it illegal.
Deal Guru
Jan 25, 2007
12127 posts
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Paris
lennyandcarl wrote: Monday-Sunday is a range of dates and is perfectly acceptable. Annoying but acceptable.

Just because it sucks and is annoying doesn't make it illegal.
Monday - Sunday is not a date. It’s a range. #excelbros
Deal Guru
Jan 25, 2007
12127 posts
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Paris
“In any case where at least 24 hours written notice has been given to the tenant, the written notice must set out: the reason for entry; the date the landlord will enter; and. the time of entry between 8:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m.Jan 4, 2011

Date. Not date(s). DATE.
Deal Addict
Jan 18, 2013
2981 posts
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B.C.
Jerico wrote: “In any case where at least 24 hours written notice has been given to the tenant, the written notice must set out: the reason for entry; the date the landlord will enter; and. the time of entry between 8:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m.Jan 4, 2011

Date. Not date(s). DATE.
:facepalm:

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