Sports & Recreation

[OFFICIAL] Cycling thread for commuters and the casual enthusiast

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  • Oct 16th, 2020 11:59 am
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Deal Guru
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Jan 30, 2006
11748 posts
1770 upvotes
Vancouver
Swerny wrote: I’d try a good mechanical disc like the Avid BB7 or TRP Spyre.

If you insist on going hydraulic then try something like Shimano Deore from a UK shop like Merlin
Thanks.
Deal Addict
Jun 27, 2006
1377 posts
1521 upvotes
Toronto
shikotee wrote: They sell kits that can be mounted on any frame?
Usually, you need a frame and fork that has mount points for disc brakes.
This. Check if your frame can handle the new brakes before buying them especially if buying from overseas. Spacing will probably be an issue never mind the frame being designed to handle being stressed at different points.

Knowing the terrain and adjusting your riding style accordingly based upon weather conditions is key. This is more important than new equipment. The laws of physics won't change but new brakes will give you a little more leeway. But all that matters is that you feel more safe on your ride.
Deal Guru
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Jan 30, 2006
11748 posts
1770 upvotes
Vancouver
maple1 wrote: This. Check if your frame can handle the new brakes before buying them especially if buying from overseas. Spacing will probably be an issue never mind the frame being designed to handle being stressed at different points.

Knowing the terrain and adjusting your riding style accordingly based upon weather conditions is key. This is more important than new equipment. The laws of physics won't change but new brakes will give you a little more leeway. But all that matters is that you feel more safe on your ride.
Exactly. That’s why I let the bike shop handle this :). And they take the accountability. I’ve been taking it to this shop for years.
Deal Addict
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Mar 20, 2009
3893 posts
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Toronto
maple1 wrote: This. Check if your frame can handle the new brakes before buying them especially if buying from overseas. Spacing will probably be an issue never mind the frame being designed to handle being stressed at different points.

Knowing the terrain and adjusting your riding style accordingly based upon weather conditions is key. This is more important than new equipment. The laws of physics won't change but new brakes will give you a little more leeway. But all that matters is that you feel more safe on your ride.
Forgot to add - you will also need to replace your wheelset.
Also, your brake levers.

In theory, I suppose you could mount adapters onto the frame and fork, but it would be a huge pain.
Its something an experienced bike mechanic could pull off, but would be silky for a casual rider to try.
Any slight movement or misconfiguration would compromise safety.

As they say - it is possible to steer a car using your feet - that doesn't mean its a good idea.
Deal Guru
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Oct 5, 2008
13121 posts
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Toronto
maple1 wrote:
This. Check if your frame can handle the new brakes before buying them especially if buying from overseas. Spacing will probably be an issue never mind the frame being designed to handle being stressed at different points.

Knowing the terrain and adjusting your riding style accordingly based upon weather conditions is key. This is more important than new equipment. The laws of physics won't change but new brakes will give you a little more leeway. But all that matters is that you feel more safe on your ride.
shikotee wrote: Forgot to add - you will also need to replace your wheelset.
Also, your brake levers.

In theory, I suppose you could mount adapters onto the frame and fork, but it would be a huge pain.
Its something an experienced bike mechanic could pull off, but would be silky for a casual rider to try.
Any slight movement or misconfiguration would compromise safety.

As they say - it is possible to steer a car using your feet - that doesn't mean its a good idea.
Did either of you guys open the link he posted?

He already has mechanical disc brakes.

He won't need new wheels, there's no issue with "spacing", it will bolt right on so long as he gets the proper mount brakes.

Frankly i wouldn't bother, but it's not as big a deal as you're making it out to be.
Deal Fanatic
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Jul 7, 2003
7133 posts
1895 upvotes
T dot 6
Swerny wrote: I’d try a good mechanical disc like the Avid BB7 or TRP Spyre.
I agree. Mechanical disc brakes sounds like the way to go, hydraulic disc brakes sound like over kill.
stubhub and clearly.ca suck, like really suck
Deal Fanatic
Apr 25, 2006
6035 posts
1021 upvotes
wrong thread
"If you make a mistake but then change your ways, it is like never having made a mistake at all" - Confucius
Newbie
Mar 31, 2017
51 posts
24 upvotes
Looking to buy a bike trailer (Thule Cadence) to attach to a bike but was wondering if anyone has experience with towing a trailer on a carbon fiber frame. Didn't think about the bike trailer when the bike was purchase last year so can't change the bike itself.

Won't be towing a child but rather a 6 to 7 lb dog in the trailer on either gravel or paved trails so likely max 30 to 35 lbs including the trailer itself.
Deal Guru
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Oct 5, 2008
13121 posts
7200 upvotes
Toronto
SeeCCC wrote: Looking to buy a bike trailer (Thule Cadence) to attach to a bike but was wondering if anyone has experience with towing a trailer on a carbon fiber frame. Didn't think about the bike trailer when the bike was purchase last year so can't change the bike itself.

Won't be towing a child but rather a 6 to 7 lb dog in the trailer on either gravel or paved trails so likely max 30 to 35 lbs including the trailer itself.
I did it for a few years with My Diamondback Haanjo gravel bike.

No issues.

For whatever reason, mechanics have told me it puts strain on the rear wheel.

I've been asked by mechanics if i tow anything when in for rear wheel truing
Deal Addict
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Mar 20, 2009
3893 posts
2044 upvotes
Toronto
SeeCCC wrote: Looking to buy a bike trailer (Thule Cadence) to attach to a bike but was wondering if anyone has experience with towing a trailer on a carbon fiber frame. Didn't think about the bike trailer when the bike was purchase last year so can't change the bike itself.

Won't be towing a child but rather a 6 to 7 lb dog in the trailer on either gravel or paved trails so likely max 30 to 35 lbs including the trailer itself.
So long as the trailer is mounted to your bike via quick release skewer, you should be fine.
Carbon is quite strong.
Obviously, ride carefully, and refrain from taking ridiculously sharp turns.
Newbie
Mar 31, 2017
51 posts
24 upvotes
Swerny wrote: I did it for a few years with My Diamondback Haanjo gravel bike.

No issues.

For whatever reason, mechanics have told me it puts strain on the rear wheel.

I've been asked by mechanics if i tow anything when in for rear wheel truing
shikotee wrote: So long as the trailer is mounted to your bike via quick release skewer, you should be fine.
Carbon is quite strong.
Obviously, ride carefully, and refrain from taking ridiculously sharp turns.
Thanks! Will look into the quick release skewer
Sr. Member
Mar 16, 2018
675 posts
763 upvotes
Hamilton
cluless wrote: Looking for some help/recommendations on a budget friendly bike trainer. Any insight/feedback is greatly appreciated - TYVM!!
Have you decided on wheel-on vs wheel-off? That's the major decision in terms of setting a budget and recommendations.
Have you read DCRainmakers guide from last year? https://www.dcrainmaker.com/2019/10/the ... -2020.html

Do these thing first and come back.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Oct 5, 2008
13121 posts
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Toronto
cluless wrote: Looking for some help/recommendations on a budget friendly bike trainer. Any insight/feedback is greatly appreciated - TYVM!!
depends on your budget?

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