Home & Garden

Old house vs New house?

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  • Aug 12th, 2012 1:37 pm
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Jr. Member
Aug 23, 2009
165 posts
14 upvotes
Vancouver
Judging by the comments in this thread, people generally refer to new houses as in new-development neighborhoods? In Vancouver, a healthy amount of new homes are from tearing down older homes, and replacing it with new ones.
Deal Expert
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Dec 12, 2009
19239 posts
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Toronto
Definitely resale. Established neighborhood, larger lots, closer to everything...
Deal Fanatic
Apr 20, 2011
7747 posts
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ON
ntan wrote: Judging by the comments in this thread, people generally refer to new houses as in new-development neighborhoods? In Vancouver, a healthy amount of new homes are from tearing down older homes, and replacing it with new ones.
The volume/availability of those is severely limited, so when referring to 'new', most of the time people are talking new cookie cutter subdivisions.

And even then, as I said, those style kill half the benefits people like in old properties, as they don't usually take one house and rebuild in place. They sever the lots to 2, 3, 4+ and cram in as many houses as they can fit.
There goes your decent size land point, and you might still have construction noise/mess on the other units when you move in if you're in the first one and they weren't built all at once.
Jr. Member
Aug 23, 2009
165 posts
14 upvotes
Vancouver
aqnd wrote: The volume/availability of those is severely limited, so when referring to 'new', most of the time people are talking new cookie cutter subdivisions.

And even then, as I said, those style kill half the benefits people like in old properties, as they don't usually take one house and rebuild in place. They sever the lots to 2, 3, 4+ and cram in as many houses as they can fit.
There goes your decent size land point, and you might still have construction noise/mess on the other units when you move in if you're in the first one and they weren't built all at once.

Thanks for the information. I've only been in Ottawa for 2 months and have considered buying a new home within the next 4 years... but browsing around, I've seen nothing but "cookie cutter subdivisions" in terms of new home offerings, which really differ from what I'm accustomed to in Vancouver.
Deal Addict
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Jul 29, 2006
2196 posts
455 upvotes
Guelph
New homes for better equity, customization and energy efficiency. You can't renovate older homes to have 9' ceilings.
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Macreo Photography
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Oct 10, 2006
164 posts
2 upvotes
Toronto
Thai wrote: New homes for better equity, customization and energy efficiency. You can't renovate older homes to have 9' ceilings.
On some you can (when adding a second storey) but I don't believe new houses by default are more efficient at all. My 1930's house with double layer brick walls is fully insulated and with energy efficient windows and doors. The only difference I know mine will be here for another 100 years while new subdivision homes are built (i realize there are exceptions) like crap.
Sr. Member
May 14, 2010
561 posts
81 upvotes
Mississauga
I would never buy a *new* home in a subdivision, if I had more money, I would knock a house down and build a single *new* one
Deal Guru
Dec 31, 2005
13306 posts
731 upvotes
We much prefer to have a older home in an established neighbourhood.
We also prefer rads to forced air
We don't find that energy usage is particularly high...addtothat, with huge well established trees we didn't hacpvetoeven use airconditioning due to cooling effect of the shade.
Banned
Mar 17, 2012
460 posts
15 upvotes
MISSISSAUGA
A new home. Who knows who lived there previously? Would you use someone else's used condom for example? Old houses are just that. Someones discarded, used house.
Deal Guru
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Mar 1, 2004
12862 posts
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Pickering
Old.

Big lots, built better. Nobody that gets a new home gets what they wanted and almost 100% of new home owners are unsatisfied. Kitchens today are a joke. Tiling is crooked, walls are crooked, your new paved driveway will be cracked in 3 years. You can't fit a car in the garage. You can't leave a car in front of the house because the bumper overhangs the sidewalk. Your neighbour is in your lap because the lot is dinky. You'd better pray you don't develop foundation issues.

You buy a new home and think it's cleaner because nobody has lived there? Workers have peed and defecated in your vents and walls. They have left garbage in every nook and cranny. Two inches under your new sod is broken bits if brick and wiring and all the garbage you thought they cleaned up before they laid the sod (they PURPOSELY wait until you are gone before they do that one). Your new furnace is a hunk of garbage and a toy and if you got A/C that is a joke as well. The electrical wiring looks as if it was done by a two year old and the fixtures they give you are from the 1960's. Tiles in your kitchen will crack over time because the floor flexes too much because they house just isn't built as good.

If I buy a old house, I can still gut it before I move in. There are all the telltale signs if there was an issue. I WANT the furnace to be a goner so that I can tell the seller I have to replace the furnace, take the money off the price and then buy a top of the line furnace/AC. I'd like to find as many problems as possible (that are fixable), get a discount on the used house and fix the issues.

I'm very glad other people aren't handy at all or think renos are a bid deal.. You will spend extra money buying new everything and I will buy the used stuff, save money and have a better product. That doesn't just go for homes, but other things as well.

Even if you watch Homes on Homes, half the stuff he takes apart is less than 3 years old, builder grade stuff. Tarion is the relatives of the home builders, good luck.
Deal Fanatic
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Oct 25, 2003
9131 posts
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AudiDude wrote: Old.

Big lots, built better.
No kidding, I love my 80' wide lot. Driveway enters on the side of my house, I never see my neighbours! :)
it's me ramin.
Jr. Member
Jul 18, 2011
134 posts
5 upvotes
Katchemash wrote: A new home. Who knows who lived there previously? Would you use someone else's used condom for example? Old houses are just that. Someones discarded, used house.
Do you bring your own cutlery, glasses and plates to a restaurant?
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jul 29, 2006
2196 posts
455 upvotes
Guelph
AudiDude wrote: Old.

Big lots, built better. Nobody that gets a new home gets what they wanted and almost 100% of new home owners are unsatisfied. Kitchens today are a joke. Tiling is crooked, walls are crooked, your new paved driveway will be cracked in 3 years. You can't fit a car in the garage. You can't leave a car in front of the house because the bumper overhangs the sidewalk. Your neighbour is in your lap because the lot is dinky. You'd better pray you don't develop foundation issues.

You buy a new home and think it's cleaner because nobody has lived there? Workers have peed and defecated in your vents and walls. They have left garbage in every nook and cranny. Two inches under your new sod is broken bits if brick and wiring and all the garbage you thought they cleaned up before they laid the sod (they PURPOSELY wait until you are gone before they do that one). Your new furnace is a hunk of garbage and a toy and if you got A/C that is a joke as well. The electrical wiring looks as if it was done by a two year old and the fixtures they give you are from the 1960's. Tiles in your kitchen will crack over time because the floor flexes too much because they house just isn't built as good.

If I buy a old house, I can still gut it before I move in. There are all the telltale signs if there was an issue. I WANT the furnace to be a goner so that I can tell the seller I have to replace the furnace, take the money off the price and then buy a top of the line furnace/AC. I'd like to find as many problems as possible (that are fixable), get a discount on the used house and fix the issues.

I'm very glad other people aren't handy at all or think renos are a bid deal.. You will spend extra money buying new everything and I will buy the used stuff, save money and have a better product. That doesn't just go for homes, but other things as well.

Even if you watch Homes on Homes, half the stuff he takes apart is less than 3 years old, builder grade stuff. Tarion is the relatives of the home builders, good luck.
Old = asbestos for starters. Also, old homes have NO garages, NO air conditioning (unless you count the ones you stick in your windows), etc. The only thing old homes have going for them may be structural integrity and lot size. But don't forget, with lot size comes the tax. All the plumbing and electrical wires will be dated and will be on the brink of failure, if not now but in the very near future. New homes have new codes to abide by, you talk as if new homes today are being built en masse from China at discounted prices.
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Macreo Photography
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Mar 24, 2008
1028 posts
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Etobicoke
I'm another for OLD HOME... The new with the garade extended past the front entrance have a nick name.....I'm sure most have heard.

I grew up in a 3 stroy Victorian (approx 1880's) that back onto Dufferin Grove Park. Sure it was inadequately insullated for winters but it had charactor, street had 100+yr old trees.
Move to a 1920's appartment on College st. couldn't beat the size of the rooms for the money.

Then bought my first home near Brock/College and it too was built 1920's. Solid as a rock.
I now own in an established area of Etobicoke with homes built in the early 50's. tree lined street.
Talk about solit construction, from one corner of the house to the other only has settled 1/2", can you say that for most new?

My bro-in-law bought a home costing twice mine in NewMarket and part of his home had settled more than two inches in just 5 yrs, causing all kinds of issues.

The only issue in my area now is, the new buyers are knocking the roof off the bungalows and building monster homes. This area will start looking like the Glencarin/dufferin/bathurts area.
The only place you're going to find a helping hand, is at he end of your own wrist. Joe Mondello
Deal Guru
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Mar 1, 2004
12862 posts
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Pickering
Thai wrote: Old = asbestos for starters. Also, old homes have NO garages, NO air conditioning (unless you count the ones you stick in your windows), etc. The only thing old homes have going for them may be structural integrity and lot size. But don't forget, with lot size comes the tax. All the plumbing and electrical wires will be dated and will be on the brink of failure, if not now but in the very near future. New homes have new codes to abide by, you talk as if new homes today are being built en masse from China at discounted prices.
I don't know where the homes you speak of are anything made in the last 60 years easily has a garage. Asbestos? None in any homes I know of that are up to 60 years old.

Wires don't fail for no reason. They would have to be installed incorrectly which can and does happen in a new build. How would a wire "fail". As I mentioned, the garage is so small on new homes if you can get your car in it, you can't open the door to get out. Your kids can't play in the postage stamp sized yard, so they use the street which is annoying and dangerous. Tax amounts are specific to areas, but if the property is useless and for another $900 per year it can be useful, does that really matter?

You need to see how the homes are constructed to see what really goes on. I saw a guy do footings with the help of his 2 and 5 year old kids. Don't tell me they are qualified. I have been running wiring over ducting that you could move up to a foot either way with your hands. That will flex so much at the joints, so you know air is leaking out. Also once the person finishes the basement and the 50 cent furnace kick on with a bang ( variable speed furnaces that ramp up smoothly, are not available ) what kind of noise do you think that will make?

I've seen zig-zag plumbing drains before they hid it with the drywall. I witnessed the perpetually drunk guys that frequented the same pool hall as me install windows incorrectly. They used rotten wood found on the construction site and they cut it with chainsaws leaving gashes in the subflooring.

Hot water plumbed into toilets. Houses five feet shorter than they were supposed to be. Paved driveways that when I stepped on them sank 5 inches and them slowly rose back up ( paved over sponge I guess). Wavy walls. Bacon wave baseboards and door casings. Cheap carpet that feels like concrete.

Bottom line is, they are like you said. Thrown together like a product en masse from China , but with no discount. You dont get to pick the brick colour and I hate red.If you buy after it is built, you can see what you are getting before you pay. Old homes have garages and they have AC. BTW AC is not guaranteed to come with a new house, several friends and customers have had to add it afterwards. Also a paved driveway isn't guaranteed either.

If I buy a new home, you will see the kitchen for sale on Kijiji and me sistering the floor joists and boxing them so the floor doesn't flex when I put real tiles in.

New homes from smaller builders trying to get a good reputation or custom builds can give you a better home.

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