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which ontario universities have good french studies programs?

[OP]
Newbie
Dec 10, 2019
3 posts

which ontario universities have good french studies programs?

I heard from my teacher that york and uoft are pretty good for french but i dont know any other schools/programs for french. if you happen to know, could you tell me what unique qualities and facilities the programs have? thanks
13 replies
Sr. Member
Mar 6, 2015
691 posts
50 upvotes
Laurentian University in Sudbury, University of Ottawa, University of Windsor, Trent University in Peterborough, Lakehead University in Thunder Bay, plus York University and Uoft that you mentioned seem to have French Language related programs. Please note that I am mentioning availability only, not how good a program is.

Census2016:
On the cities themselves, substantial numbers of the populations on average in Ottawa and Sudbury speak French.

English Wikipedia: French language in Canada
The residents of Ottawa, Sudbury, Windsor and Toronto can receive services from their municipal government in the official language of their choice. Do these two pieces of information resonate with what you are looking for in university programs?
Last edited by cybercavalier on Dec 14th, 2019 1:39 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Meiji: Ambassador Swanbeck, I have concluded that your treaty is NOT in the best interests of my people. So sorry, but you may not.
Swanbeck: This is an outrage!
Deal Fanatic
Jul 13, 2012
6665 posts
948 upvotes
Ottawa
cybercavalier wrote: Laurentian University in Sudbury, University of Ottawa, University of Windsor, Trent University in Peterborough, Lakehead University in Thunder Bay, plus York University and Uoft that you mentioned seem to have French Language related programs. Please note that I am mentioning availability only, how how good a program is.

On the cities themselves, substantial numbers of the populations in Ottawa and Sudbury speak French. The availability that the residents of Ottawa, Sudbury, Windsor and Toronto can receive services from their municipal government in the official language of their choice. Do these two pieces of information resonate with what you are looking for in university programs?
Fun fact: At the University of Ottawa, you can write almost any assignment, test or exam in either English or French, regardless of the language of the course.
[OP]
Newbie
Dec 10, 2019
3 posts
Thanks for replying, I really appreciate it! However, I'm looking more for the quality of the actual program. For example, what learning facilities and resources are provided? Is it a quality learning experience that can open up career opportunities because of the recognition of the quality of the program? Is there a supportive learning environment? if it a progressive curriculum? (of course I don't expect you to know all the answers to these questions but I was just prompting them so you could have a better idea of what I'm asking)
Sr. Member
Mar 6, 2015
691 posts
50 upvotes
Census2016 averages:
In Sudbury, The language at work is however hugely predominated in English which is a bit below provincial average. French is the second choice which is about 4.5 times above the provincial average. French at work for male as the first choice doubled the provincial average; for female about 3.5 times above.

In Ottawa, English and French bilingualism predominates: more than triple above the provincial average First language French speakers are over 4 times than the provincial average. the use at work is where Sudbury and Ottawa differ from each other. French as the most often used language is more than triple of the provincial average; as such English in the same situation goes below, given the bilingualism background. However, French as the second regularly used language at work in Ottawa is more than 5 times the provincial average, again given the bilingualism background. Given Ottawa is the national capital, that last piece of info is acceptable and more or less expected. There is no significant split between the genders.

So in sum, if the OP is looking for Sudbury specific or Sudbury-like information that is focused by the French language, Sudbury is worth contemplation. For work or professional programs that make use of the skills of and speaking the French language, rank Ottawa ahead of Sudbury.

I did not look into Windsor or Toronto but the Census2016 links have been attached. Similar observations can be drawn.
Last edited by cybercavalier on Dec 18th, 2019 12:05 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Meiji: Ambassador Swanbeck, I have concluded that your treaty is NOT in the best interests of my people. So sorry, but you may not.
Swanbeck: This is an outrage!
Sr. Member
Jun 10, 2013
588 posts
256 upvotes
I hear Glendon is good, just make sure that they don't go down during a CUPE strike lol. You don't want to delay your graduation because of someone else's labour dispute...The thing is, people generally don't speak French in Toronto and the best way to learn is immersion. So Ottawa and Sudbury are good, as well as any Quebec school (where you may see triple digit tuition figures (def triple figures for Quebec residents but not sure for out-of-province) - Bonus!)
Sr. Member
Jun 10, 2013
588 posts
256 upvotes
Pourquoi voulez-vous étudier le français? Qu'est-ce-que c'est ta stratégie des metiers?
My French sucks, 12 years of French Immersion followed by a decade and a half of non-use. I never used my French and I've worked civil service positions in Ontario!
Sr. Member
Mar 6, 2015
691 posts
50 upvotes
Hobotrader wrote: The thing is, people generally don't speak French in Toronto and the best way to learn is immersion. So Ottawa and Sudbury are good, as well as any Quebec school (where you may see triple digit tuition figures (def triple figures for Quebec residents but not sure for out-of-province) - Bonus!)
I am not sure about Sudbury. Even though Laurentian University have lots of programs in French, the Census 2016 stats shows ppl in Sudbury speaks English at work much more. At UOttawa, there is French immersion but BEd program in French. There is biligualism outside the university where French can be used often. As I noted above, if French studies programs are the targets, then
Coates, K; Morrison, B., "What to consider if you're considering university." 2014
page 84-85. Sudbury[...] and other blue-collar town... You study on the campus, not in the town or city.
So the census information about the cities (GTA, GSA, Ottawa-Gatineau) shall be viewed in the context of the learning experience.

However, if co-op and work experiences in the city are considered, then the use of language at work shall be considered in the context. The following could be incorrect in some contexts: looking at the Google map of Ottawa and Sudbury, if I were the OP, I can force myself to speak French using French language skills while living there. My experience would be similar to living in TO speaking English as a second language while I would study at UofT. At Carleton, I would feel like a York University student. At Laurentian, I would feel like a McMaster or University of Guelph student.
Last edited by cybercavalier on Jan 18th, 2020 10:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Meiji: Ambassador Swanbeck, I have concluded that your treaty is NOT in the best interests of my people. So sorry, but you may not.
Swanbeck: This is an outrage!
Newbie
Jul 30, 2018
26 posts
28 upvotes
Hey! I went to University of Waterloo for their French program. I was considering Laurentian University for teacher's college and I was really impressed. There are so many Franco-Ontarians up there, posters around the school were all bilingual, there were so many radio stations playing French music... there are a lot of opportunities for you to interact with Francophones and to practice your skills. I imagine University of Ottawa, Carleton or Glendon would be the same.

I just wanted to talk about my experiences with Waterloo though. :) The class sizes were small (~ <30 students) and you get to know your professors really well. There is an exchange to Nantes, France in 3rd year that you can take part in. It's a partnership with Trent University and Université de Nantes that has been going on for 20 years and it's a fantastic exchange. You live in residence, you can request a host family, you can volunteer in French schools, and there are organized trips for you. You also take UW courses in France so you don't have to deal with the headache of trying to transfer credits over. In 4th year, I was able to be a TA for intermediate French classes for a year. There are also summer work opportunities with the department. Because the department is so small, you get so many opportunities. I imagine opportunities like this would be way more competitive if you went to Glendon, Ottawa or Laurentian. The department offers courses in grammar, literature, linguistics, translation, history, and business. It was a pretty good selection. I definitely enjoyed my time there, so please let me know if you have any questions about it! If you're thinking about being a French teacher, I went to Western for teacher's college so feel free to ask me anything. :)
Deal Guru
Feb 7, 2017
14635 posts
11851 upvotes
Eastern Ontario
As pointed out by the others here...
Franco Ontarians tend to reside in Northern Ontario
And Eastern Ontario
So both Sudbury & Ottawa are going to have universities offering French studies at a higher level of competency
Where you choose to go to school is up to you
Little Ontario City ... Sudbury (Greater Sudbury Region = https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greater_Sudbury )
Or
Bigger Ontario City ... Ottawa (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ottawa)
The latter also being literally on Quebec’s doorstep ... and twinned with Gatineau ... not 5 minutes across the River
As part of the National Capital Region (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_ ... n_(Canada) )

The flow of people and language between the two cities ... is seamless

The University of Ottawa / Université d’Ottawa as another poster mentioned is totally bilingual. In fact, it is the LARGEST BILINGUAL UNIVERSITY IN THE WORLD

And as such highly respected, and sought out by both French & English Undergrads, Graduate Students, Professors & Researchers from around the world

Be that in Languages, Education, The Arts, Social Studies, Law, Engineering, Science, or Medicine

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_Ottawa
https://www.uottawa.ca/en

I cannot speak specifically to the French Languages Program ... but I can assure that the university offers something unique in Canada, and within a setting onto itself ... being in Canada’s capital city with all that brings as far as Arts, Culture, Sports, Entertainment etc ... and opportunity at the exact spot where Lower Canada & Upper Canada combine.

Plus the added bonus of being within easy reach of Montreal (< 2 Hours) ... Quebec City (< 5 Hours) ... Toronto (< 5 Hours) ... and even Upstate NY (< 1 Hour)

Don’t know where you live ... as your RFD Profile shows no location
But if you can ... you should give Ottawa & the Université d’Ottawa a look see
Plan a visit !
Beautiful City no matter the season
I assure you, you’ll be pleasantly surprised
Sr. Member
Mar 6, 2015
691 posts
50 upvotes
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mdlfng wrote: Hey! I went to University of Waterloo for their French program. I was considering Laurentian University for teacher's college and I was really impressed. There are so many Franco-Ontarians up there, posters around the school were all bilingual, there were so many radio stations playing French music... there are a lot of opportunities for you to interact with Francophones and to practice your skills. I imagine University of Ottawa, Carleton or Glendon would be the same. If you're thinking about being a French teacher, I went to Western for teacher's college so feel free to ask me anything. :)
maggied1102 wrote: Thanks for replying, I really appreciate it! However, I'm looking more for the quality of the actual program. For example, what learning facilities and resources are provided? Is it a quality learning experience that can open up career opportunities because of the recognition of the quality of the program? Is there a supportive learning environment? if it a progressive curriculum? (of course I don't expect you to know all the answers to these questions but I was just prompting them so you could have a better idea of what I'm asking)
There seems to be a difference between French and French Studies. Use the educanada tool to search....
In addition to York U, Western University, UWindor, UGuelph and Queens' also offer French studies.
If the post or comment helps or delights you, please CLICK that LIKE BUTTON!😃
Meiji: Ambassador Swanbeck, I have concluded that your treaty is NOT in the best interests of my people. So sorry, but you may not.
Swanbeck: This is an outrage!

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