Automotive

Opinions on 2nd hand Porsche Cayenne (955)

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[OP]
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Sep 3, 2018
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Opinions on 2nd hand Porsche Cayenne (955)

I recently stumble upon a 2006 Porsche Cayenne 955 asking for only $6K. I have done some research and I read that old Cayennes (espcially 1st gen 955) isn't all that great when it comes to reliability.
Should I go for it?
18 replies
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Feb 11, 2007
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jojobakylin wrote: I recently stumble upon a 2006 Porsche Cayenne 955 asking for only $6K. I have done some research and I read that old Cayennes (espcially 1st gen 955) isn't all that great when it comes to reliability.
Should I go for it?
If you have money to maintain and repair it.
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jojobakylin wrote: I read that old Cayennes (espcially 1st gen 955) isn't all that great when it comes to reliability.
Should I go for it?
There's a reason why this formerly $100,000 SUV is now $6, and a decent Porsche 99x of 10-15 years can still hold decent value of $20-60k, down from $120-150k.

Be prepared to spend another $8 to fix it.
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Jul 30, 2007
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Hmm. Why would you spend $6k and park it inside the garage ? 🤷‍♀️
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booblehead wrote: Hmm. Why would you spend $6k and park it inside the garage ? 🤷‍♀️
as an Home Trophy and/or take photos and post on social media about being a new Porsche Owner.



You did you research and already knew they are not reliable, so what is your point to ask us questions again, you find that answer already.
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All the old yellow headlight Porsches look so meh.
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Their resale is absurdly low because:

- Difficulty of servicing them; difficult to find parts and a mechanic that is experienced at working on them. Some have unique maintenance requirement as well. Not to mention the average person seeking such a vehicle, would know little about working on them.
- Bringing it to the dealership would not be cost effective at all.
- Those in that budget range usually look for used Hondas/Toyotas instead.
- Those looking for luxury SUVs are usually soccer moms with wealthy (or high-borrowing-capacity) spouses, or old farts with a large amount of money, looking to just drive a status symbol that is also practical to operate on a daily basis. They rather go just go lease a brand new one with $1,XXX - 3,XXX down-payment, with warranty, make monthly payments of such amounts, while writing off up to $800/month + taxes of each payment. Not only the maintenance obligations are lower, but the initial cash outlay. So there is very little demand for the older ones.

I have a 2012 BMW X5 5.0i (competitor to the Cayenne S) that is worth about $16,000 today only, with about 124,000km. Brand new optioned just like it, it was over $90,000 - closer to $100,000 in today's dollars, or for a 2020 for that matter. A similar year Honda/Toyota pickup or SUV often costs even more out here - have seen $20,000 for Toyota Tundras or Tacomas with close to 200,000km.

I work on it myself and owned high end vehicles (Mercedes, BMW, etc.) since I was 18, working on them myself. So I can get away with it without taking it to the shop. Over the years I've had to do very little work to them. But, whenever I need parts for one of those vehicles, I'm ordering them online to have the shipped in from the US or Europe somewhere. One day I was lazy and decided to just let a local mechanic change the oil. They didn't even have the correct sized oil filter, so I was stuck doing it myself.

Vehicles with turbos like the Cayenne also are more sensitive to proper operation, maintenance, and care. They are mechanically more complicated. Diesel pickup trucks will have the same issue, and maintenance bills in the thousands are common involving injectors or turbos. The money is in the labour, not so much parts. If it takes them 10 hours to work on it, at $150/hour shop rate, that's already $1,500.

The internet can be misleading with lots of questionable information. I owned a few "time bomb" vehicles with bad reviews but haven't had much issues with them.

Regardless of what vehicle you buy, they will require maintenance - just question is when. When I was working, a 60 - 105 hour week was common, as well as my colleagues... thus, we opted to just finance near-brand-new with warranty, or lease for tax benefit, and warranty. We did not have the spare time to be working on vehicles; if our vehicles did require warranty work, we'd just drop them off at the dealer, and drive a loaner until they were done. Time was better off spent making money or doing something that made us smile, so we could go back to making money.

For older vehicles requiring more unique maintenance, usually the only people who can practically operate them are those with ample time to work on them (e.g. young guy, or enthusiast), or they weren't a daily driver.
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Well said. @FirstGear
The only time I would say "Go ahead" for people to buy old used Euro is when they can service, fix and maintain the car on their own without having to bring the car to the shop every time something broke.

Plus, also have a second car in the household that you can use in case that car broke and you need another ride to go to work or do your errands.
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I'd say avoid at all costs.....not because of reliability or maintenance or the costs associated but because it is F...ing ugly....lol, what a POS oh and because it also looks like a 10 year old kia rondo lol
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macdonlg wrote: I'd say avoid at all costs.....not because of reliability or maintenance or the costs associated but because it is F...ing ugly....lol, what a POS oh and because it also looks like a 10 year old kia rondo lol


This is what I always imagine when someone buys 10+ yr old Porsche that isn't a 911.
[OP]
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Sep 3, 2018
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Thanks @FirstGear. Very useful info. In general I'm looking for an everyday SUV that's still relatively sporty, would you recommend a BMW x3 / x5 within the 2010-2015 range?
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jojobakylin wrote: Thanks @FirstGear. Very useful info. In general I'm looking for an everyday SUV that's still relatively sporty, would you recommend a BMW x3 / x5 within the 2010-2015 range?
The turbo and GTS with V8 have known issues with the engines. V6 is more or less bullet proof. I have seen quite a few Cayenne V6 with 400-500K on odometer.
As @FirstGear mentioned any Luxury SUV will be money pit in maintenance and they don't hold their values very well.

Here is some interesting read.
https://www.carthrottle.com/post/nx685zq/
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jojobakylin wrote: Thanks @FirstGear. Very useful info. In general I'm looking for an everyday SUV that's still relatively sporty, would you recommend a BMW x3 / x5 within the 2010-2015 range?
Depends on what you define sporty. My former vehicles were: a 2015 BMW M4 convertible (6-speed manual), 2019 Merc C63S AMG, 2008 335i Convertible (5-speed manual), 1997 BMW 328i (5-speed), 2012 Toyota Tundra

Other vehicles I have driven: Porsche Macan S, Cayenne S, Boxster S (2016), Mercedes GLE 350, 2010 Toyota Rav4, Honda Civics from multiple years, Volvo S80, X5 diesel.

The I6 (3.0L) X5 feels like it does not move. The V8 variants (X5 4.8i, 5.0i; X5M) have much more grunt. They are easier to break loose accelerating at a turn/corner. But they are big, heavy vehicles, and AWD: so you don't really "feel" it going fast; rather, you look down at the odometer and realize you're going to lose your license. But, they have more horror stories associated with them - although I personally, have never had issues with them.

But if you are coming from something less than about 250HP, 250 ft-lbs of torque, and never had a luxury vehicle before: then you will enjoy the I6 X5 (3.0i). If it's not your first luxury vehicle or one with a similar power level, it is not life changing. One thing that throws a lot of people off is the X5 shifter. In order to change gears, there is an electronic lock button you have to hold down before you can actually engage the gear shifter.

On that note, if power is not a concern, also consider the diesel version, as they are much more fuel efficient and (generally) last longer. Lots of high mileage diesel X5s running around. But, they are hard to find in low mileage for that reason, as people usually bought those to drive them. Same goes for the Cayenne Diesel. An old co-worker of mine used to get 1,000 - 1,200km from 1 tank of diesel from his 2016.

As for the Porsche vs. the BMW: Out here, the Porsches hold resale much better, but then they were more expensive to buy. I test drove the Cayenne S before I got my X5 5.0 a few years ago. The Cayenne S (personally) I find to be the nicer looking and finished vehicle. The E70 X5 nav. and interface feels ancient. But if you're looking at vehicles at that age, the differences you hardly will notice as they've aged since then. Driving feel wise, the Cayenne vs. the X5 don't feel that different... at the end of the day, they were larger, heavier vehicles with more ground clearance, that could tow, and get you unstuck if you get stuck. These characteristics came with the "luxury" aspect inside and were funner to drive than your average SUV. The extra power makes passing or maintaining your high speeds, take less effort.

V8 twin turbo setups also eat a lot more fuel. If you're in the city all the time, expect to burn 17-20L/100km of premium. My I6 twin turbo would eat 12.8L/100km even when driving like I stole it.
V8 vehicles also naturally will require a little more work, regardless of make. They are more powerful, the engine has more spark plugs and ignition coils, etc. - so, more work to maintain them. Aside from common known problems, the additional maintenance comes more so from that rather than model specific quirks.

Though unless you really need a SUV, a car is more fun and generally less money and work to keep. If you want the space, consider a wagon or sedan, such as a M5, 5 series, E63. They depreciate like bricks so finding deals on them is not impossible. But again, unless you're willing to source parts and learn to work on them, they can be cost-prohibitive. I just have a SUV as I used to drive into the bush (off-road) with it, where my car would not find it pleasant. Fast forward years later, I'm stuck with it as I couldn't afford to keep the car (Mercedes C63S).
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FirstGear wrote: Their resale is absurdly low because:

- Difficulty of servicing them; difficult to find parts and a mechanic that is experienced at working on them. Some have unique maintenance requirement as well. Not to mention the average person seeking such a vehicle, would know little about working on them.
- Bringing it to the dealership would not be cost effective at all.
- Those in that budget range usually look for used Hondas/Toyotas instead.
- Those looking for luxury SUVs are usually soccer moms with wealthy (or high-borrowing-capacity) spouses, or old farts with a large amount of money, looking to just drive a status symbol that is also practical to operate on a daily basis. They rather go just go lease a brand new one with $1,XXX - 3,XXX down-payment, with warranty, make monthly payments of such amounts, while writing off up to $800/month + taxes of each payment. Not only the maintenance obligations are lower, but the initial cash outlay. So there is very little demand for the older ones.

I have a 2012 BMW X5 5.0i (competitor to the Cayenne S) that is worth about $16,000 today only, with about 124,000km. Brand new optioned just like it, it was over $90,000 - closer to $100,000 in today's dollars, or for a 2020 for that matter. A similar year Honda/Toyota pickup or SUV often costs even more out here - have seen $20,000 for Toyota Tundras or Tacomas with close to 200,000km.

I work on it myself and owned high end vehicles (Mercedes, BMW, etc.) since I was 18, working on them myself. So I can get away with it without taking it to the shop. Over the years I've had to do very little work to them. But, whenever I need parts for one of those vehicles, I'm ordering them online to have the shipped in from the US or Europe somewhere. One day I was lazy and decided to just let a local mechanic change the oil. They didn't even have the correct sized oil filter, so I was stuck doing it myself.

Vehicles with turbos like the Cayenne also are more sensitive to proper operation, maintenance, and care. They are mechanically more complicated. Diesel pickup trucks will have the same issue, and maintenance bills in the thousands are common involving injectors or turbos. The money is in the labour, not so much parts. If it takes them 10 hours to work on it, at $150/hour shop rate, that's already $1,500.

The internet can be misleading with lots of questionable information. I owned a few "time bomb" vehicles with bad reviews but haven't had much issues with them.

Regardless of what vehicle you buy, they will require maintenance - just question is when. When I was working, a 60 - 105 hour week was common, as well as my colleagues... thus, we opted to just finance near-brand-new with warranty, or lease for tax benefit, and warranty. We did not have the spare time to be working on vehicles; if our vehicles did require warranty work, we'd just drop them off at the dealer, and drive a loaner until they were done. Time was better off spent making money or doing something that made us smile, so we could go back to making money.

For older vehicles requiring more unique maintenance, usually the only people who can practically operate them are those with ample time to work on them (e.g. young guy, or enthusiast), or they weren't a daily driver.
very well said and put...for some of us that grew up fixing our own (dad made me start watching at about age 8)...we are not afraid to tackle, well...almost anything,,and look beyond common reviews...i have worked with all brands over the years and have a personal opinion/biased based on my repair histories dealong with each individual brands...,as i get older..i value my time better so i pick my spots..and my vehicles
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Apr 5, 2010
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^Lol, you're recommending M5 and E63 to someone who has $6k for a 15 year old 955?

One repair or even just one visit to the shop just to baseline a pre-owned M5/E63 is $6k.

I also drive 10+ year old heavily depreciated German cars that were once $60-80k but now bought off Kijiji for $7-10k. I'm won't be upset if I have a catastrophic failure that's more than $3k. Because then I just put it back up on Kijiji as-is for $4k and call it a day.

Are 955s reliable? No. For starters, water collects in the doors and the shell becomes a fish tank. Also, there are an uncanny number of Cayennes with failed v8 engines. The v6 955, you're basically buying a touraeg, which can be had for $3-4k.

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