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[OP]
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Oct 16, 2008
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Opinions on UAP-AC-LITE

Thinking to get this, anyone installed it at home? What are your thoughts, pros and cons? Please share. My cable modem and router (TP-Link Archer 8) are on 2nd with 100/10 internet. I have dead spots and weak signal areas (specially in basement). I had used wifi extenders before, but they were no help.
https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B01DRM ... AZOA&psc=1
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Sr. Member
Sep 13, 2011
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Ubiquiti is great for the price.
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Sep 10, 2005
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They're great but don't expect a single AP to necessarily improve things. The strength in using these things is to use multiple units and to hardwire them.
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Sep 13, 2011
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Dave98 wrote: They're great but don't expect a single AP to necessarily improve things. The strength in using these things is to use multiple units and to hardwire them.
I think you are mixing AP with mesh network, thoses are 2 differents technology. 1 Ubiquiti AP work great alone.
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elgros4 wrote: I think you are mixing AP with mesh network, thoses are 2 differents technology. 1 Ubiquiti AP work great alone.
No, I'm not mixing them up. One access point isn't necessarily any better than a single regular commercial router when it comes to coverage.
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Aug 2, 2004
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East Gwillimbury
Dave98 wrote: No, I'm not mixing them up. One access point isn't necessarily any better than a single regular commercial router when it comes to coverage.
You must hardwire these. How else would they work? It is not a mesh

You’re right about the single access point not being any better than a commercial router. But most commercial routers don’t have WiFi and all consumer routers are junk

Look @teoconca, he has a consumer router. That is the first thing he needs to replace. Why would anyone buy a router that is only 10/100?

A strategically placed Ubiquiti access point will cover most homes. No need for a second access point
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Apr 4, 2001
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UniFi is a great system, but to get the most out of it you really need to be fully invested in UniFi equipment.

I don't really see the benefit of adding a UAP as a single access point to some other system.

These aren't Wi-Fi range extenders. The intent is that you strategically place the access points to get good coverage and connect them via cable to a wired network (they are PoE-capable so with the right equipment you only need to attach a Cat5+ cable with no additional power supply required).

To manage it effectively, you need to run UniFi controller software on a server 24x7, or get their cloud key which runs the controller on a USB stick. It's not like a router that has the management software built into it. That is a lot of overhead to support a single UAP.

If you want a mesh that doesn't require so much wiring, look at Google Wi-Fi or similar. This would replace your existing equipment. While UniFi is affordable for the home and has many home users, it's really designed for small business.
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Gee wrote: You must hardwire these. How else would they work? It is not a mesh

You’re right about the single access point not being any better than a commercial router. But most commercial routers don’t have WiFi and all consumer routers are junk

Look @teoconca, he has a consumer router. That is the first thing he needs to replace. Why would anyone buy a router that is only 10/100?

A strategically placed Ubiquiti access point will cover most homes. No need for a second access point
Ubiquiti APs do support wireless uplink and can function as repeater/extenders

Yes, a strategically placed AP could potentially cover his entire home. That doesn't change my statement though while disregarding my mis-use of commercial/consumer. The point is, a single AP doesn't necessarily help if all you're doing is replacing the wireless function on his Archer 8. It's not that black and white. So, yes OP could buy one and see how well it goes first and stick to using the Archer 8 as the router but with the wireless turned off.
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Mar 17, 2006
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Gee wrote: You must hardwire these. How else would they work? It is not a mesh

You’re right about the single access point not being any better than a commercial router. But most commercial routers don’t have WiFi and all consumer routers are junk

Look @teoconca, he has a consumer router. That is the first thing he needs to replace. Why would anyone buy a router that is only 10/100?

A strategically placed Ubiquiti access point will cover most homes. No need for a second access point
It's his internet at 100/10 from provider.

Unless he's hardwiring the AP, it's still gonna be shitty with this router as the wifi signal doesn't get everywhere anyway.

So it's either:
-keep this router and hardwire an AP to a good location OR
-get a mesh
[OP]
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Oct 16, 2008
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konsensei wrote: It's his internet at 100/10 from provider.

Unless he's hardwiring the AP, it's still gonna be shitty with this router as the wifi signal doesn't get everywhere anyway.

So it's either:
-keep this router and hardwire an AP to a good location OR
-get a mesh
Which router are you suggesting? Which mesh? I have/need 2 desktops hardwire to router.
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teoconca wrote: Which router are you suggesting? Which mesh? I have/need 2 desktops hardwire to router.
If you can, try to go with Ubiquity, pricy but certainly more reliable than most.
I use Linksys mesh 6600 with an additional node (didn't really need, but I got it for cheap, so why not)
And as much I as I hate them, you could also go with some newer ASUS that support AI MESH and branch out more nodes later as you wish.
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mbg wrote: To manage it effectively, you need to run UniFi controller software on a server 24x7, or get their cloud key which runs the controller on a USB stick. It's not like a router that has the management software built into it. That is a lot of overhead to support a single UAP.
This is incorrect, you can work with the Unifi controller on your phone or Windows desktop. It only needs to be on during set up and times you want to update the firmware.
I run an AC-lite in my condo and its the only Unifi product working tandem with my Edgerouter and old Archer C7 which acts only as an AP with same network names.

Ubiquiti APs are definitely stronger in WiFi comparison because all that money is dedicated to just WiFi rather than router.
[OP]
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Oct 16, 2008
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Maple
konsensei wrote: If you can, try to go with Ubiquity, pricy but certainly more reliable than most.
I use Linksys mesh 6600 with an additional node (didn't really need, but I got it for cheap, so why not)
And as much I as I hate them, you could also go with some newer ASUS that support AI MESH and branch out more nodes later as you wish.
Thanks. What do you think this?
https://www.amazon.ca/Asus-RT-AC86U-Dua ... 157&sr=1-2
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Jan 10, 2017
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Yikes, it's cheaper to go with a Edgerouter x and an UAP-AC-lite for that price. UAP-AC range is pretty beefy,
It reaches my bus shelter 70ft down with a direct line of sight from my condo side, or an unusable connection at my elevator from the corner condo.
[OP]
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Gee wrote: Definitely go with an Ubiquiti Edge Router (~$90) and a UniFi Access Point
how do they work? Connect modem to Edge (wire) then connect AP to Edge via wire?
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Aug 5, 2003
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Dave98 wrote: Yes, a strategically placed AP could potentially cover his entire home. That doesn't change my statement though while disregarding my mis-use of commercial/consumer. The point is, a single AP doesn't necessarily help if all you're doing is replacing the wireless function on his Archer 8. It's not that black and white. So, yes OP could buy one and see how well it goes first and stick to using the Archer 8 as the router but with the wireless turned off.
Like you said it depends, for the old house it was much easier to place a UAP in the middle of the house on the ceiling, then to relocate the router from the basement to a similar location. Result was much improved wifi.

I'd certainly do it again that way.
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teoconca wrote: how do they work? Connect modem to Edge (wire) then connect AP to Edge via wire?
Yes, the edgerouter (spf version come with the proper power adapter out of box while the normal x will need a more powerful power supply) can even power the AP from the PoE port so you can mount it to a ceiling or wall with just the ethernet cord.

I recommend watching some youtube videos on how to set them up as they are popular to have in the IT youtube channels, which means you should get great guides.

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