Real Estate

Ottawa Real Estate market discussion

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  • Oct 23rd, 2020 7:54 pm
Deal Addict
Jan 15, 2017
3436 posts
2782 upvotes
jk9088 wrote: ...

Just out of curiosity, would you mind elaborating on which features of the house you didn't like? (I don't think I've ever actually been inside a 60s/70s era house so I didn't know what aspects you were referring to.)
The 60s/70s era comment referred to the house being a wide but narrow rectangle. Today's houses tend to be longer than wide - Caivan's was wider than long.

There were several design elements that we did not like. IIRC, the staircase had many tight turns with narrow triangle shaped steps. I don't like those as they are a serious tripping issue. The stairs going to the finished basement felt really tight. The model home had the upgraded kitchen and we felt that the island formed a huge working barrier between the appliances. We all tend to want to work from one side of an island and we felt that we would literally be banging into the island trying to work in the kitchen.

Upstairs felt like a lot of long, narrow hallways. The master was large and seemed to have a lot of wasted space. The ensuite was nice, but the large window would require some sort of permanent privacy. We noticed that the shower doors in the washrooms all appeared to have a fixed portion at the rear end of the shower and the moveable portion at the front of the shower. This would mean you would have to enter the shower directly under the shower head and I wouldn't like that. The shower doors used were also very heavy to push and daily use could become a problem. If I had been interested in one of their homes, I would have had to get clarification on whether the shower setup could be changed.

Our interest was with their corner lot home. We liked the floor plan and the options to make some changes with the layout. Ultimately, I didn't like the lot locations and didn't like the pricing. In Orleans, it looks like they will be building towns off of Innes and this means that until the areas east of the development are built up by others, you will enter the community off of busy Innes and drive through streets built with towns to reach singles. Drive through almost any street with towns and you will encounter lots of on street parking and this can be a problem in winter trying to navigate snow filled streets.
Deal Addict
Feb 17, 2012
1348 posts
272 upvotes
ORLEANS
I’m looking for a home in Orléans. Budget is max $400,000. I think I can only afford a townhome end unit preferred. But it seems like I cant afford any new build townhomes from mattamy and minto etc? Is used townhomes my only option?
Deal Addict
May 18, 2015
1445 posts
472 upvotes
Ottawa,Ont
Palidino wrote: I’m looking for a home in Orléans. Budget is max $400,000. I think I can only afford a townhome end unit preferred. But it seems like I cant afford any new build townhomes from mattamy and minto etc? Is used townhomes my only option?
Mattamy will have quick delivery homes under 400k at some point in Orleans. They currently do in Kanata
Deal Addict
Nov 26, 2011
2016 posts
199 upvotes
Ottawa
nikels21 wrote: Mattamy will have quick delivery homes under 400k at some point in Orleans. They currently do in Kanata
Which Matyamy homes will have quick move in? I thought they sold all their Mattamy Summerside West homes months ago. I did hear they will begin Mattamy Summerside South homes in April though if that is what you are referring to.
Deal Addict
May 18, 2015
1445 posts
472 upvotes
Ottawa,Ont
masoud100 wrote: Which Matyamy homes will have quick move in? I thought they sold all their Mattamy Summerside West homes months ago. I did hear they will begin Mattamy Summerside South homes in April though if that is what you are referring to.
Exactly, next phase of Summerside should have some quick deliveries at some point if you are patient
Deal Addict
Nov 20, 2011
4050 posts
245 upvotes
Ontario, Canada
What are some of the the best builders in Barrhaven?
Traveling 😁
Sr. Member
May 23, 2017
723 posts
471 upvotes
skeet50 wrote: The 60s/70s era comment referred to the house being a wide but narrow rectangle. Today's houses tend to be longer than wide - Caivan's was wider than long.

There were several design elements that we did not like. IIRC, the staircase had many tight turns with narrow triangle shaped steps. I don't like those as they are a serious tripping issue. The stairs going to the finished basement felt really tight. The model home had the upgraded kitchen and we felt that the island formed a huge working barrier between the appliances. We all tend to want to work from one side of an island and we felt that we would literally be banging into the island trying to work in the kitchen.

Upstairs felt like a lot of long, narrow hallways. The master was large and seemed to have a lot of wasted space. The ensuite was nice, but the large window would require some sort of permanent privacy. We noticed that the shower doors in the washrooms all appeared to have a fixed portion at the rear end of the shower and the moveable portion at the front of the shower. This would mean you would have to enter the shower directly under the shower head and I wouldn't like that. The shower doors used were also very heavy to push and daily use could become a problem. If I had been interested in one of their homes, I would have had to get clarification on whether the shower setup could be changed.

Our interest was with their corner lot home. We liked the floor plan and the options to make some changes with the layout. Ultimately, I didn't like the lot locations and didn't like the pricing. In Orleans, it looks like they will be building towns off of Innes and this means that until the areas east of the development are built up by others, you will enter the community off of busy Innes and drive through streets built with towns to reach singles. Drive through almost any street with towns and you will encounter lots of on street parking and this can be a problem in winter trying to navigate snow filled streets.
Thanks for the comments, it's nice to get perspectives on features that may be problematic but which I've never thought about myself. I'll definitely have to look into some of those issues at my design centre appointment. I also never knew the 60s/70s houses tended to have the wider floorplans...interesting, and I wonder why builders moved away from that trend.
Deal Fanatic
Jul 4, 2004
5618 posts
1690 upvotes
Ottawa
cyberfreak123 wrote: It's back on the market , with higher price and hold back offers period. Good deal for any looking for a townhouse in the West, if the bidding war doesn't get too crazy...

https://purplebricks.ca/on/ottawa-and-s ... realtor.ca
Those typically sell for low 200s (last sale was in November for $210) although there was one that sold for $270 last August (end unit). Price would likely depend a lot on the condition and any upgrades and renovations which it does sound like it has but offhand, it seems overpriced to me (it was $8k less two weeks ago and is assessed at around $230k (although you really can't base yourself too much on assessed value).
Deal Fanatic
Jul 4, 2004
5618 posts
1690 upvotes
Ottawa
fogetmylogin wrote: True but the surge seems to be actually pretty evenly distributed. East, South and Central also doing very well.
I would respectfully disagree - if you look at 5 years return over the whole city, most areas have not gone up that much.
Newbie
Sep 30, 2018
8 posts
1 upvote
Simaahoy wrote: What are some of the the best builders in Barrhaven?
there's not much going on in Barrhaven right now other than Minto (Harmony, Riversbend, QP) and Mattamy. I think all the land around Barrhaven Centre is full.

If you don't mind, I would suggest across the Vimy bridge into Riverside South, there's Urbandale, Richcraft, HN Homes, Claridge, etc.
Deal Addict
Jan 15, 2017
3436 posts
2782 upvotes
jk9088 wrote: Thanks for the comments, it's nice to get perspectives on features that may be problematic but which I've never thought about myself. I'll definitely have to look into some of those issues at my design centre appointment. I also never knew the 60s/70s houses tended to have the wider floorplans...interesting, and I wonder why builders moved away from that trend.
Land became too expensive. That's why in large cities you never see those split level bungalows anymore. They were also wider than long and most were sitting on 60' lots. Today you build a 4000+ sq ft home on a 60' lot, or luxury semis.
Sr. Member
Aug 14, 2007
516 posts
275 upvotes
Ottawa
I think the trend is people do not like to live in a big house, the size of the family is getting smaller. People choose to being single, or even they have married, they choose to not have kids. Even they plan to have kids, they only plan to have one or maximum two kids. Unlike my parents generation, four to six kids are very common.
People enjoy to travel more often, you will find that the city is half empty during Christmas and summer. Anyway, I can foresee that the big house (3000 sq ft +) is getting harder and harder to sell in the future. On the other hand, good location semi and townhouse will see a larger growth for the next few years.
Deal Fanatic
Jul 4, 2004
5618 posts
1690 upvotes
Ottawa
audiorichard wrote: I think the trend is people do not like to live in a big house, the size of the family is getting smaller. People choose to being single, or even they have married, they choose to not have kids. Even they plan to have kids, they only plan to have one or maximum two kids. Unlike my parents generation, four to six kids are very common.
People enjoy to travel more often, you will find that the city is half empty during Christmas and summer. Anyway, I can foresee that the big house (3000 sq ft +) is getting harder and harder to sell in the future. On the other hand, good location semi and townhouse will see a larger growth for the next few years.
I have to disagree; 30-40 years ago a 2000-2500 sq ft detached home was a big house and few had bigger than that. Now, many townhomes are that big or bigger. Also, before it was hard to find 3000+ sq ft, now if you are building in the right community, you can probably get 4500+.

I agree that 3000+ sq ft is going to be harder and harder to sell but only because RE prices are going up faster than salaries.
Sr. Member
Aug 14, 2007
516 posts
275 upvotes
Ottawa
michelb wrote: I have to disagree; 30-40 years ago a 2000-2500 sq ft detached home was a big house and few had bigger than that. Now, many townhomes are that big or bigger. Also, before it was hard to find 3000+ sq ft, now if you are building in the right community, you can probably get 4500+.

I agree that 3000+ sq ft is going to be harder and harder to sell but only because RE prices are going up faster than salaries.
Maybe I should say it more clearly. Back in the date, builders usually built 2500 sq ft house in the 50’ or 60’ lot with a big backyard. Now builders will built a 2000-2500 sq ft townhouse or 3 stories high townhouse without backyard (rear-lane townhouse). Land is getting expansive which is one of the major reason why builder do not build a small house in a big land. The other major reason is people do not want a big backyard, many people do not want to pay premium to buy something that they will not use. If you have experience to own a big house before, you will understand how much time, afford and money maintain an “evergreen” backyard. Of course, there are always some people enjoy their time in the backyard, but the new generation is more enjoy their time inside their house or spend their money on travel. Builders are smart, they build depend on the market demand. It is clear that townhouse or rear-lane townhouse selling like hot cake in this market.

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