Travel

Passenger bill of rights

  • Last Updated:
  • May 27th, 2019 12:00 pm
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9 replies
Deal Expert
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May 10, 2005
36063 posts
10158 upvotes
Ottawa
"Flight disruptions within an airline's control but required for safety reasons will not require compensation but airlines will have to maintain a standard of treatment and complete a passenger's itinerary."
Well, having been in the aviation business, there are many ways of deeming an aircraft "unsafe" thereby avoiding compensation for a delayed or cancelled flight.
It is a step in the right direction though.
The Government cannot give to anybody anything that the Government does not first take from somebody else.
[OP]
Member
Aug 16, 2010
398 posts
236 upvotes
Sudbury
I haven't seen an article where a journalist has reached out to Gabor Lucaks(sp?) for comment yet. I'd be interested to hear his take.
Member
Nov 26, 2012
330 posts
284 upvotes
Toronto
Can’t wait to see how this pans out. About the only good thing about an election year. Lol.
Deal Fanatic
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Feb 19, 2010
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Pete_Coach wrote: "Flight disruptions within an airline's control but required for safety reasons will not require compensation but airlines will have to maintain a standard of treatment and complete a passenger's itinerary."
Well, having been in the aviation business, there are many ways of deeming an aircraft "unsafe" thereby avoiding compensation for a delayed or cancelled flight.
It is a step in the right direction though.
This.

Too much ambiguity and that was the commentary that came out of all the so-called feedback solicited by Garneau last year. There was too much input from the industry that watered down these regulations to preclude them from being as effective as, for example, EC261/2004 in Europe. The end result, I suspect, will be higher costs for flying and limited real benefits for the traveling public. Just my opinion but we'll see how this pans out.
Jr. Member
Feb 27, 2011
156 posts
130 upvotes
I think one unintended consequence will be the ramping up of the existing practice (and growing problem) of airlines padding their flight times to ensure "on-time" arrival. On some routes, it's already a bit ridiculous.

Also, I'll be interested to see how these new rules are enforced, especially as it's common knowledge among frequent fliers and aviation geeks that airlines will often be less-than-honest about the real reasons individual flights are delayed or cancelled.

"Delayed arrival at a final destination of between three to six hours will cost large airlines $400 and small airlines $125. Delays of between six to nine hour will cost large airlines $700 and small airlines $250. Delays greater than nine hours will cost large airlines $1,000 and smaller airlines half that amount."

I hope this new focus on delayed arrival ends up in the final regulations. I know from personal experience that airlines, up till now, have only compensated for delayed departure and not delayed arrival. The former is easier to manipulate, especially if passengers are re-routed to their final destination via longer and less convenient flight plans.
Deal Addict
May 16, 2017
1556 posts
1959 upvotes
Pete_Coach wrote: "Flight disruptions within an airline's control but required for safety reasons will not require compensation ...
Hard to think of a typical flight disruption within an airline's control that doesn't have a safety aspect. Given controllable delays are most often mechanical or crew availability and given that the plane by regulation can't fly "safely" without certain minimal equipment functionality or crewing level, what else is left?
Deal Expert
User avatar
May 10, 2005
36063 posts
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Ottawa
robsaw wrote: Hard to think of a typical flight disruption within an airline's control that doesn't have a safety aspect. Given controllable delays are most often mechanical or crew availability and given that the plane by regulation can't fly "safely" without certain minimal equipment functionality or crewing level, what else is left?
As I said in the part of my post you deleted "having been in the aviation business, there are many ways of deeming an aircraft "unsafe" thereby avoiding compensation for a delayed or cancelled flight.".

All of that aside, it will be interesting to see if this new direction will have any teeth. It will also be interesting to see if airfares will increase to cover the cost of the potential payouts. If so, even a $10 or $20 per flight increase is a huge money maker for the airlines. Bigger than even the amount they make on baggage fees.
The Government cannot give to anybody anything that the Government does not first take from somebody else.
Deal Addict
Jan 31, 2013
1448 posts
321 upvotes
Red Deer, AB
Yes, I expect a price increase too, to compensate for the new rules.
Sr. Member
Sep 6, 2016
756 posts
294 upvotes
knuks101 wrote: Yes, I expect a price increase too, to compensate for the new rules.
They are increasing price anyway and any year sometiems without any6 good reason
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