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Path to Get a 'Good' Government Job?

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  • May 21st, 2019 1:46 pm
[OP]
Member
May 24, 2012
253 posts
52 upvotes
Toronto

Path to Get a 'Good' Government Job?

Serious question. Asking on behalf of someone else.
Sometimes we hear about those 'government jobs' that are cushy, easy, pay decent, and don't require that much skill.

What are those jobs exactly? And what type of education does one need to get them?
32 replies
Deal Addict
Feb 4, 2010
4054 posts
2816 upvotes
LOL...that's a very vague question, doubtful you'll get much of answer. I don't know what "decent pay" means for you, but if you have little skill or education, doubtful you'll get a decent paying job. Those decent paying jobs are commensurate with experience, eduation and skill. Nowadays without that, you're lucky if you get an entry level admin position - even then it's' who you know or sometimes luck. Internal staff generally get first pick. I know peope with master degrees in admin positions. I suggest telling "your friend" to first figure out what kind of job he/she wants, look at some job postings and try to get some of the skills and experience listed in the posting. Then craft a smart cover letter and resume specific to the job where you present yourself in the best light possible without being dishonest...that will be your best bet.
Member
Dec 11, 2013
414 posts
291 upvotes
Toronto
In addition, there are usually some jaded feelings and ignorance behind those descriptions.
Deal Addict
Jul 7, 2013
1270 posts
912 upvotes
North York
JFlash20 wrote: In addition, there are usually some jaded feelings and ignorance behind those descriptions.
Agreed. Can taste the salt in the air
Newbie
Jun 25, 2013
42 posts
14 upvotes
MARKHAM
Canadian Forces

Many office type jobs there if your willing to relocate and don't mind doing the Basic Military Qualification.
Deal Addict
Oct 18, 2014
1960 posts
852 upvotes
HK
If your friend requires you to ask and research on their behalf, then their probability of success is low.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Mar 7, 2007
4015 posts
1519 upvotes
Why not look into Canadian banking?

Plenty of relatively cushy, easy, and low paying jobs. But there is a lot more "intellectual stimulation" than in the government.

Eventually, people can go from low paying jobs to more challenging positions, and make some decent money.

Working for the government is not for everyone!
Newbie
Sep 30, 2010
76 posts
59 upvotes
Mississauga
motomondo wrote: Why not look into Canadian banking?

Plenty of relatively cushy, easy, and low paying jobs. But there is a lot more "intellectual stimulation" than in the government.

Eventually, people can go from low paying jobs to more challenging positions, and make some decent money.

Working for the government is not for everyone!
what is the path to canadian banking?

You must be talking about retail banking...
Sr. Member
Jan 1, 2015
639 posts
525 upvotes
Toronto, ON
weirdlogic wrote: Serious question. Asking on behalf of someone else.
Sometimes we hear about those 'government jobs' that are cushy, easy, pay decent, and don't require that much skill.

What are those jobs exactly? And what type of education does one need to get them?
  • University degree, engineering preferred
  • Canadian Forces experience (anything really to get veteran status). Would probably be best to be a technician or something doing some maintenance.
  • French speaking
  • Minority'
  • Canadian citizen
If you can get all of the above, you pretty much have the your pick at whatever government job you want.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Mar 7, 2007
4015 posts
1519 upvotes
jackpie wrote: what is the path to canadian banking?

You must be talking about retail banking...
It can be anything. It can be retail banking, or technology, or corporate. Young people can start at an entry level job, and make a career out of it.

I know a man who started as a bank teller, and today is a SVP in technology. His success story is not typical, but it is a reminder that you can make a successful career here.

Honestly, I prefer the banks over the government (I work in banks, but in the past, I tried working for an agency of the provincial government).
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2011
35087 posts
21059 upvotes
Center of Universe
Find someone that is in a management position.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Nov 10, 2015
2243 posts
853 upvotes
Monte Creek, BC
If you are English speaking, then learn to speak French. If you can speak it well enough you have a good chance of moving up in the federal government. This is about the only reason to be bilingual in French and English.
No political content in signatures (Who did I offend?)
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 24, 2007
1434 posts
1611 upvotes
BC
weirdlogic wrote: Serious question. Asking on behalf of someone else.
Sometimes we hear about those 'government jobs' that are cushy, easy, pay decent, and don't require that much skill.

What are those jobs exactly? And what type of education does one need to get them?
That ought to be one of the biggest myths about government jobs that's out there - cushy (like doing little work), easy (not mentally challenging or manual labour), decent pay (like over $35,000) and requires little skill. Funny, how everyone talks about these "government jobs" but no one knows anyone who works in one.

How about Politician?? Pays really well, can be dumb as rocks, don't do anything but attend signing ceremonies, and the only skill needed is BS skills feeding gullible voters what they want to hear. Proof: Look at the Idiot-in-Chief down South.

If you really want to research what government jobs "pays decent" you just have to look up the collective agreements for the various governments - they are all publicly available. As to jobs that "pay decent" and meet all the other criteria you mentioned, good luck. "Mail clerk" may be one that is listed but good luck trying to get it from the current incumbent.
Sr. Member
Sep 28, 2013
666 posts
363 upvotes
motomondo wrote: It can be anything. It can be retail banking, or technology, or corporate. Young people can start at an entry level job, and make a career out of it.

I know a man who started as a bank teller, and today is a SVP in technology. His success story is not typical, but it is a reminder that you can make a successful career here.

Honestly, I prefer the banks over the government (I work in banks, but in the past, I tried working for an agency of the provincial government).
CEO of CIBC's first job was a teller.
Deal Addict
Sep 22, 2013
2269 posts
1409 upvotes
I can’t tell if the OP is being serious or not.

Are you seriously asking what are Government jobs?

They’re jobs where people work for the Government. Generally, working for a crown corporation (organization owned by the Government) is usually also considered to be a Government job.

‘How do people get these jobs’ - They apply (usually online) for them.

Not that difficult to comprehend.
Deal Addict
Jan 15, 2017
3641 posts
3007 upvotes
It would help if you wrote which level of government - federal, provincial or municipal.

I agree with a previous poster. The idea that govt workers are low skilled with cushy well paid jobs is a cliche that is about 40 years old.

As a former HR Manager with e federal govt, I can provide some insight for you, if you are interested in a federal govt position.
Deal Fanatic
Jul 4, 2004
5873 posts
1931 upvotes
Ottawa
FrugalConsumer wrote:
  • University degree, engineering preferred
  • Canadian Forces experience (anything really to get veteran status). Would probably be best to be a technician or something doing some maintenance.
  • French speaking
  • Minority'
  • Canadian citizen
If you can get all of the above, you pretty much have the your pick at whatever government job you want.
I would have to disagree with the comment. Certainly while all these qualifications can help get a government job, they certainly won't give you "your pick at whatever government job you want". Even with those getting a government job is not easy and having those will not give you that much of an edge over others. There are certainly some jobs where you need to speak french or bilingual but the majority of government positions are English essential (although as you move up into management and senior management roles, being bilingual becomes a requirement).
Newbie
Jun 21, 2015
82 posts
9 upvotes
Montreal
For anyone working at gov't job. Once you're in, are there opportunities to grow and move up? Or are you stuck in the same position for a long time before you can move up. Thank you.
Deal Fanatic
Jul 4, 2004
5873 posts
1931 upvotes
Ottawa
momawj wrote: For anyone working at gov't job. Once you're in, are there opportunities to grow and move up? Or are you stuck in the same position for a long time before you can move up. Thank you.
It's a bit weird. The ability to move is one of the benefits of gov jobs. Once you are a permanent employee, it's quite easy to move laterally and there are tons of internal opportunities. There are also a lot opportunities to move up but from my experience, it's not like with private sector companies where your boss will give you a promotion for a job well done. It's very common to get "acting" opportunities (temporary promotion - typically 4 months but sometimes 1 year or more but to get a permanent promotion is rarely direct. I believe it's probably because of past abuse and to make sure the process is transparent but you pretty much have to apply to open jobs in order to move up and then there's a formal or semi-formal process. The other thing that's different than private sector is that pretty much all gov jobs have a set pay scale and you can't be outside the payscale and payscales have steps - each year you go up one step and get a specific raise. Once you hit the top of the scale, your salary will not go up any more except for the usual "cost-of-living" increase (often about 1% or less per year). (i.e. if you stay in the same job category / level for 20 years, you'll get regular annual raises about about 5% but once you hit the top of the scale, your salary will never go higher (except for the cost of living increase). Everyone at the same level gets the same raise and for non-exec staff, there are no bonuses (i.e. two employees in the same category / level will get the same raise even if one is a great employee and the other one a terrible employee).

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