Food & Drink

pizza pan that doesn't rust / do you put pizza directly on oven rack?

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[OP]
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pizza pan that doesn't rust / do you put pizza directly on oven rack?

Can you guys point me to a circular pan that does NOT rust? Every single one I bought eventually blackens and rusts, so annoying.

Also, a lot of those frozen pizza instructions tell you to put the pizza *directly* on the rack...that's crazy, do ppl actually do that? I'm sure it probably cooks better, but it's gonna make a mess of the oven 'floor'.
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I have a perforated one made of aluminum, but it begins to warp (not a big deal).

You can also use a ceramic pizza stone in the oven,but it takes a while longer to preheat. Bonus is it will work on your bbq too.
tranquility922 wrote: Can you guys point me to a circular pan that does NOT rust? Every single one I bought eventually blackens and rusts, so annoying.

Also, a lot of those frozen pizza instructions tell you to put the pizza *directly* on the rack...that's crazy, do ppl actually do that? I'm sure it probably cooks better, but it's gonna make a mess of the oven 'floor'.
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Jun 14, 2008
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Yeah frozen pizza will do perfectly fine directly on rack, don't thaw it beforehand. Also unless you pile lots of extra cheese it won't drip.
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Been using Pilsburys pizza pan for a while

So far so good. Very much recommend

As for the rack thing I wouldn't do that myself. But think about it if pizza doesn't make a mess on the pan why would it on the rack? Everything on pizza has been sticking together when I take it out of the oven..
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[OP]
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Some of the crust sticks to the rack and I'd have to clean it eventually so I prefer a pan, in addition to blocking any falling stuff when I take it out of the oven.
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For frozen pizzas I just place on rack. You can put foil either on the rack below (but not under the pizza) or oven bottom to prevent any mess. For pizzas I make myself I use a stone. I don't recommend a stone for frozen though as I tried it and it just sogmasters it lol.
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We have a pizza stone, they just get better over time. However, if you want good frozen pizza, you can put it on aluminum foil sprayed with a little oil and put it directly in the rack.
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Silly question, but for 'rack users', how do you take it out? Does it make a mess on your rack?

I think the foil on the lower rack is a good idea, tx.
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tranquility922 wrote: Silly question, but for 'rack users', how do you take it out? Does it make a mess on your rack?

I think the foil on the lower rack is a good idea, tx.
I have put frozen pizza directly on the rack, but then don’t put extra cheese or anything. To take it out, I just use a pair of tongs and pull it onto the cutting board. You do it quickly so topping doesn't fall off.

Tin foil works on the bottom rack, but like I said make sure there is a little oil on the foil. You can put it on parchment but then it needs to be on the middle rack so the parchment does not set on fire. I still prefer a stone as these techniques don’t work as well for home made fresh dough, but they will work in a pinch.

On all cases make sure your oven is really hot.
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tranquility922 wrote: Silly question, but for 'rack users', how do you take it out? Does it make a mess on your rack?

I think the foil on the lower rack is a good idea, tx.
I typically use a large BBQ-size metal spatula. You don't need to get the whole thing just separate from the grid of the rack and then slide it out. Be sure to have a large enough plate/tray or pizza pan (lol) to put it on to. Now yeah you're still gonna need a pan or large wood board or something so you can cut the pizza. However cooking it on the rack is better any way you slice it (pardon the pun) because it makes it more crisp that way.
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Macx2mommy wrote: I have put frozen pizza directly on the rack, but then don’t put extra cheese or anything. To take it out, I just use a pair of tongs and pull it onto the cutting board. You do it quickly so topping doesn't fall off.

Tin foil works on the bottom rack, but like I said make sure there is a little oil on the foil. You can put it on parchment but then it needs to be on the middle rack so the parchment does not set on fire. I still prefer a stone as these techniques don’t work as well for home made fresh dough, but they will work in a pinch.

On all cases make sure your oven is really hot.
ES_Revenge wrote: I typically use a large BBQ-size metal spatula. You don't need to get the whole thing just separate from the grid of the rack and then slide it out. Be sure to have a large enough plate/tray or pizza pan (lol) to put it on to. Now yeah you're still gonna need a pan or large wood board or something so you can cut the pizza. However cooking it on the rack is better any way you slice it (pardon the pun) because it makes it more crisp that way.
Tx for the advice. I started this thread because I faced several annoying prbs, first w the annoying rusting pizza pan, so I needed to line it w something. I've always used foil but found it sticks to the pizza, so discovered parchment, which I've been using all this time, but the prb is that it only allows up to 425F and some pizzas require much hotter temps.

I guess I'll try 1) the pizza on foil+oil and also 2) pizza on the rack and foil on lower rack...I wonder which will turn out better?
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tranquility922 wrote: Tx for the advice. I started this thread because I faced several annoying prbs, first w the annoying rusting pizza pan, so I needed to line it w something. I've always used foil but found it sticks to the pizza, so discovered parchment, which I've been using all this time, but the prb is that it only allows up to 425F and some pizzas require much hotter temps.

I guess I'll try 1) the pizza on foil+oil and also 2) pizza on the rack and foil on lower rack...I wonder which will turn out better?
Don't put foil on lower rack, it blocks the radiating heat and your pizza will be half cooked.

Put it under the lower heating element instead and change out once in a while.
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jzmtl wrote: Don't put foil on lower rack, it blocks the radiating heat and your pizza will be half cooked.

Put it under the lower heating element instead and change out once in a while.
You're right. I'll try to finally put the pizza on the rack next time.
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The brand of tray I use is Baker's secret. (the black one one with holes-not the silver one) It has non stick silicone coating, so burn/rust complications are greatly reduced.
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I put both frozen and freshly made pizzas directly on the rack and never have an issue. When done they just slide right off and onto my plate for cooling then cutting. When preparing fresh pizza I just take care to ensure that no cheese is too close to the edge such that it would drip down. Note though that putting it directly on the rack does make the pizza crispier, so if you don't like that then stick to a pan (pun intended).
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Do you have a restaurant supply store near you? My round and rectangular pizza pans are from that type of store (they’re eons old so I forget the brand) and they don’t rust at all.
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tranquility922 wrote: Can you guys point me to a circular pan that does NOT rust? Every single one I bought eventually blackens and rusts, so annoying.
Don't confuse blackening with rust.
I'm surprised you would get actual rust, if you don't leave it wet afterwards.
Put a very thin layer of oil on after drying.
ES_Revenge wrote: For frozen pizzas I just place on rack. You can put foil either on the rack below (but not under the pizza) or oven bottom to prevent any mess. For pizzas I make myself I use a stone. I don't recommend a stone for frozen though as I tried it and it just sogmasters it lol.
Same as me.
Rack for frozen.
Stone for homemade.

I'd be hesitant to put frozen on a stone due to potential of fracturing.
Maybe it is no issue, but I'm not chancing it.
tranquility922 wrote: Silly question, but for 'rack users', how do you take it out? Does it make a mess on your rack?
I use a peel.
You should be able to maneuver it onto a cookie sheet though.
Invert it, if the rims are an issue.
jzmtl wrote:
Don't put foil on lower rack, it blocks the radiating heat and your pizza will be half cooked.

Put it under the lower heating element instead and change out once in a while.
There are specific made foil trays for this(oven floor), that are heavier duty.
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arisk wrote: Don't confuse blackening with rust.
I'm surprised you would get actual rust, if you don't leave it wet afterwards.
Not confused, both happen to my pan, it's frustrating, esp the rusting. I do wash it and leave it to air dry. Still, I'd rather not have to do any 'maintenance' on it and just get one that has zero chance of rusting.
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Nov 15, 2008
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Honestly should try a pizza screen which will give you the effect of directly-on-rack but aids removal https://www.amazon.ca/New-Star-50684-Co ... 00EAXVVCY/

Second choice would be an aluminum pan but a really thin light one (which will no doubt warp, but if you want a great crust...) The time it takes the pan to heat up really affects your crust so avoid non-stick, which are slow heating steel. You want an aluminum cheapo like a Wilton https://www.amazon.ca/Wilton-Pan-Perfor ... 0000CFN5H/

Watch out for those Delissios! They have tiny perforations in the crust and grease will drip down through the pizza bottom and smoke up your oven if you don't use a pan.
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arisk wrote: Same as me.
Rack for frozen.
Stone for homemade.

I'd be hesitant to put frozen on a stone due to potential of fracturing.
Maybe it is no issue, but I'm not chancing it.
Uh yeahh I wouldn't worry about it cracking... If you think about it, look at the difference in temperature to begin with. Say you preheat your stone to 450F (you are probably going higher but let's just say that). So 450F to room temp is what, like 420 Fahrenheit degrees difference. Say your pizza is frozen even at -20C, that's -4F. So what like a difference of 454 Fahrenheit degrees--it's still way over 400 F degrees, either way. Now I'm no materials scientist here but I think you'd need at least 100 units of difference (another order of magnitude) to really present any issues like that. Put it another way, if you heated your stone/oven to 500F instead the room-temp pizza would be hitting the stone at more of a temperature difference than the frozen pizza on the 450F stone.

Anyway that aside the thing I find is that if you heat a frozen pizza on either a stone or a pan, the moisture from the frozen pizza don't come out easy and the pizza just ends up soggy even when the toppings are cooked; and it seems worse on a stone or at least has been my experience. That's I think a better reason not to use a stone for a frozen pizza.

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