Computers & Electronics

places to buy used NAS solutions

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  • Mar 25th, 2019 8:09 pm
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places to buy used NAS solutions

This topic has been discussed heavily here on RFD but I am going to say that the size of the appliance has been my biggest issue in changing over. I currently have a Drobo 800fs and it has been running great for a long time. I purchased this from an auction (company went belly up so I managed to snag this at the time for $1k - keep in mind this was about 4 years ago maybe) and I managed to obtain around 15TB of usable storage. I am running out of space now (less than 5TB available) but I figured I should get a head start on this now while I can.

I am not interested in a DIY solution as it is just too much money and time consuming at this point. My drobo doesn't support larger drives than 3TB. Anyone know of auction sites that may carry such tech from time to time? I am fine with a prebuilt solution from synology or qnap.
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Zero1 wrote:
Mar 22nd, 2019 11:35 am
. My drobo doesn't support larger drives than 3TB. Anyone know of auction sites that may carry such tech from time to time? I am fine with a prebuilt solution from synology or qnap.
Are you positive? I remember putting a 6TB drive in one and it worked. It was a few years ago so I could be incorrect. But according to their info:

https://myproducts.drobo.com/retrieve/s ... 01124.html

It clearly stated it was tested up to 4TB, and that usually doesn't mean max size is 4TB, it might also support higher, they just didn't test it.

I think the cheapest solution for you is to simply buy a cheap and bigger drive, put it in there, and see if it works. If it doesn't, then worry about buying a whole new enclosed. It is very possible that it will work with 4TB, possibly more. Since you only been using 2TB hard drives this will effectively double your capacity already. If experience is anything to go by, generally speaking, any encloser that supports 4TB usually also support up to 8TB. The limitation is usually 2TB or 8TB. Not in between.
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Guess I misread the info then.

Definitely will have to try it out with one drive and see what happens. I still need to plan for the worst in case it doesn't work out.
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Zero1 wrote:
Mar 22nd, 2019 12:45 pm
Guess I misread the info then.

Definitely will have to try it out with one drive and see what happens. I still need to plan for the worst in case it doesn't work out.
You return the 4TB drive and look for a new NAS. Or if you feeling adventurous, buy a 6TB and see if it work, if not, try a 4TB.

I dun see why it wouldn't work, though. One of these options should work.
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Zero1 wrote:
Mar 22nd, 2019 11:35 am
I am not interested in a DIY solution as it is just too much money
I am fine with a prebuilt solution from synology or qnap.
allmywat.jpg
and time consuming at this point.

Time I will kind of give you since it's not quite plug and play, but it's an hour investment (depending on the size of NAS) for a product that's better and depending on company cheaper.
Qnap might be close in terms of DIY cost, but Synology definitely won't be.
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death_hawk wrote:
Mar 22nd, 2019 1:53 pm
Qnap might be close in terms of DIY cost, but Synology definitely won't be.
Why do you say that? Both seem to be priced at a similar rate for an 8 bay unit. DIY will definitely cost more as I then need to source board, raid card, case, psu etc.. - no a lot of time for that right now.
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DIY is going to be cheaper, you can go with an i3 since all you are doing is serving files. You can proably build one for around $700-800, while the Qnap and Synology go for around $1100. You can use Unraid or OpenMediaVault for your operating system, they are both easy to use.
Plus you are problably better off switching away from Drobo because if the machine breaks down you will be unable to get your files unless you buy another one.
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Zero1 wrote:
Mar 22nd, 2019 2:29 pm
Why do you say that? Both seem to be priced at a similar rate for an 8 bay unit.
Apparently I don't know my costs as well as I thought.... Qnap has certainly gone up.
DIY will definitely cost more as I then need to source board, raid card, case, psu etc.. -
I mean... it's up to you, but a DIY can certainly be had for cheaper than I can find 8 bay units of either brand.
A quick look at a new 8 bay Synologys looks to be about $1400ish. Used doesn't bring it down by much according to ebay... a few hundred at most. Cheapest I saw was $800USD.

As an example, I could pick up an SC826 with board/CPU for about $400USD
$50 for an appropriate HBA. $75 for 32GB ECC. $25 for cables. $25 for an SSD for an OS drive.
Total is about $775CAD including shipping.
This is also a 12 bay vs an 8 bay.

What I certainly can't argue is power usage and noise though.
Neither are good compared to a standalone NAS.
I still believe in them though.
no a lot of time for that right now.
I can't argue that it is more work, but IMO you get a better product.
I'm a little biased towards ZFS though.
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I am hoping for another auction of some sort to come up so I can steal one of these for cheap like I did last time. Size of the appliance is crucial for me since I don't have a lot of space. I would have gone with a rack mount a long time ago.

I have seen cases like this for a miniature appliance DIY equivalent:

http://www.u-nas.com/xcart/product.php?productid=17617

USD pricing puts that around $300 easily. Not sure how reliable this product is, its also too bad that silverstone never went more into the NAS case segment.
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I can build you a NAS for ~$400 and it would run ZFS. Drives are definitely the expensive part of a NAS

Heat is the biggest concern, if you want a pedestal, you need to go with a mid tower case that has good air flow and lots of fans
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Zero1 wrote:
Mar 22nd, 2019 11:35 am
I am not interested in a DIY solution as it is just too much money and time consuming at this point.
You realise most off the shelf NAS boxes--Synology, Qnap, Asustor, etc. are all quite pricey when you are up to the amount of bays/storage you need right? Way more expensive than something you could build yourself as a PC (and the PC would be far faster in most cases). More power draw in most cases but you can still make some pretty low-power builds, and it's a tradeoff for more processing power.

Time consuming? Not really. It's easy to setup FreeNAS or Xpenology, and once you set it up you're off to the races.

You're free to pursue used units but I think you'd still be paying more if we're talking about something like an 8-bay unit--these things are not cheap. TBH I'd say 2-bay units are the max you'd want to buy an off-the-shelf unit, maybe 4-bay but that's max. After that the prices skyrocket and you don't really get much for performance.
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Gee wrote:
Mar 22nd, 2019 8:29 pm
I can build you a NAS for ~$400 and it would run ZFS. Drives are definitely the expensive part of a NAS

Heat is the biggest concern, if you want a pedestal, you need to go with a mid tower case that has good air flow and lots of fans
Space won't allow me to have a mid tower so I have to opt for a smaller unit such as a NAS box from Qnap etc.. If I had the space this topic would be taking a different route.

What components are you using to make a NAS for $400? These NAS boxes usually run me a low power + almost no noise which I need.
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ES_Revenge wrote:
Mar 22nd, 2019 9:07 pm
You realise most off the shelf NAS boxes--Synology, Qnap, Asustor, etc. are all quite pricey when you are up to the amount of bays/storage you need right? Way more expensive than something you could build yourself as a PC (and the PC would be far faster in most cases). More power draw in most cases but you can still make some pretty low-power builds, and it's a tradeoff for more processing power.

Time consuming? Not really. It's easy to setup FreeNAS or Xpenology, and once you set it up you're off to the races.

You're free to pursue used units but I think you'd still be paying more if we're talking about something like an 8-bay unit--these things are not cheap. TBH I'd say 2-bay units are the max you'd want to buy an off-the-shelf unit, maybe 4-bay but that's max. After that the prices skyrocket and you don't really get much for performance.
A) Yes that's why I am hoping to find an auction like I did last time where I obtained such a large volume for a relatively affordable price.

B) Maybe you are right with that, but then i would have to research why I should choose one over the other and spend time really trying to learn how the media OS handles everything. Off the shelf is quicker to program my experience.

C)It is just storing video files and nothing else. My android TV with kodi does everything else so if the unit came with an Intel Atom, at this point its already an improvement over what I currently own.
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Zero1 wrote:
Mar 23rd, 2019 2:28 pm
Space won't allow me to have a mid tower so I have to opt for a smaller unit such as a NAS box from Qnap etc.. If I had the space this topic would be taking a different route.

What components are you using to make a NAS for $400? These NAS boxes usually run me a low power + almost no noise which I need.
I build mine using older hardware. Typically Sandy or Ivy Bridge

I can build small boxes but the problem is always heat. It will prematurely kill components or drives
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I wanted to get rid of my whitebox NAS due to size & noise issues. After considering pre-built NAS devices, I ended up building one out of an HP Microserver Gen10. The chassis form factor is very similar to a 4-bay NAS device and it has 4 hot-swappable drive bays. Also has a marvell RAID controller than supports RAID 0/1/10 and 8GB RAM. And has 2 x Intel NICs for sweet LACP action.

It officially supports only 4TB drives, but it should be able to handle 12TB drives without an issue. And if you want to expand to more drives, there are 2 additional SATA ports as well as an HP HBA/RAID card you can put into an expansion slot.

It's not "plug and play" pre-built, as you'll still need to install an OS by hand onto a USB key. But there's no hardware to assemble other than plugging in the drives. The only real downside is that its sold by HPE and as such, you only get access to firmware updates for 1 year without a support contract.

In my opinion, it's a better option than trying to auction-snipe random NAS hardware with no warranty.

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