Computers & Electronics

PoE+ Ethernet to WiFi / Powerline to PoE+ Ethernet

  • Last Updated:
  • Apr 22nd, 2021 9:39 pm
[OP]
Deal Expert
Feb 24, 2018
20205 posts
23678 upvotes

PoE+ Ethernet to WiFi / Powerline to PoE+ Ethernet

Hi Gents,

I'm looking for a solution that provides the requested functionality in the title without breaking the VOIP functionality I'm trying to retain from the source PoE Ethernet cable.

I'm doing my own research, but I welcome feedback.

Thank you.
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35 replies
[OP]
Deal Expert
Feb 24, 2018
20205 posts
23678 upvotes
Here are my thoughts, lads.

PoE+ Ethernet ==> Non-PoE'ed Powerline Device (Room 1) -----------

------- Non-PoE'ed Powerline Device (Room 2) ====> PoE+ Injector =====> VOIP phone

Should I be concerned with added latency or data integrity?
.
Deal Addict
Sep 16, 2013
2774 posts
1703 upvotes
SW ON
redflagdealsguy wrote: Here are my thoughts, lads.

PoE+ Ethernet ==> Non-PoE'ed Powerline Device (Room 1) -----------

------- Non-PoE'ed Powerline Device (Room 2) ====> PoE+ Injector =====> VOIP phone

Should I be concerned with added latency or data integrity?
In room 1 you don't need PoE+ Ethernet. Connect a regular switch to the Powerline device. Assuming you had a PoE+ switch in room 1, take it to room 2 and connect it to the Powerline device and your phone. And you are done without any additional equipment.
[OP]
Deal Expert
Feb 24, 2018
20205 posts
23678 upvotes
alpovs wrote: In room 1 you don't need PoE+ Ethernet. Connect a regular switch to the Powerline device. Assuming you had a PoE+ switch in room 1, take it to room 2 and connect it to the Powerline device and your phone. And you are done without any additional equipment.
The wall RJ45 is pumping out PoE+ supported Ethernet from a switch in Room 3.

The PoE+ support is simply there.

In room 2, PoE+ will need to be injected.
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[OP]
Deal Expert
Feb 24, 2018
20205 posts
23678 upvotes
alpovs wrote: It will work either way. I found a PoE Powerline adapter but it shows as discontinued: https://www.trendnet.com/products/powerline/Powerline-200-AV-PoEplus-Adapter-Kit-TPL-331EP2K

Do you think you need PoE+? I would think that for most VOIP phones PoE (without the plus) should be enough.
You're right, the VOIP phone only seems to require PoE.

With that said, there are few modern currently in production PoE Powerline devices, the few I've found are expensive and obscure (on Amazon).
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Deal Addict
May 10, 2011
1469 posts
511 upvotes
Ottawa
redflagdealsguy wrote: You're right, the VOIP phone only seems to require PoE.

With that said, there are few modern currently in production PoE Powerline devices, the few I've found are expensive and obscure (on Amazon).
Have you considered a simply wifi extender (one with a LAN port) and a PoE injector in room 2? Does it have to be connected to the ethernet in room 1? If you already have a wifi network it will be far easier to do it this way.
[OP]
Deal Expert
Feb 24, 2018
20205 posts
23678 upvotes
csi123 wrote: Have you considered a simply wifi extender (one with a LAN port) and a PoE injector in room 2? Does it have to be connected to the ethernet in room 1? If you already have a wifi network it will be far easier to do it this way.
I'm moving the VOIP phone station from one room to another, the phone demands PoE Ethernet. It needs injection.

I'm trying powerline ethernet first because it's ironically a simpler solution, and likely presents with reduced latency. Injection is required either way though.

There are those that pose the concern regarding Gigabit Powerline suffering from greatly reduced throughput depending on electrical situation. The lowest recorded anecdote on the reviews for my device (yet to be delivered) are 36 mbps and VOIP only requires between 1 mbps and 5 mbps (and that's probably an overestimate on the high-end).
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Deal Addict
Oct 3, 2012
2022 posts
825 upvotes
Hamilton, Ontario
I am waiting for power over wifi devices. Then I will only need to upgrade wireless cables.
Deal Addict
May 10, 2011
1469 posts
511 upvotes
Ottawa
redflagdealsguy wrote: I'm moving the VOIP phone station from one room to another, the phone demands PoE Ethernet. It needs injection.
I am not sure if i misunderstood your situation, but according to what you wrote above a simple wifi extender and a PoE injector is the easiest way to do it.

Keep in mind that a device connected to the Ethernet port of the extender is not subject to additional latency unlike devices that connect to the extender via wifi. The additional latency comes from the fact that most extenders only have one air interface so it can only talk to either the source wifi network or its clients but not both at the same time. The Ethernet port of course doesn't use the air interface so there is no additional measurable latency.

A simple PoE injector will take care of the power requirement in room 2 as mentioned.

In case it isn't clear you need these:

Wifi router/AP -> wifi extender (rm 2) -> PoE injector (rm 2) -> Voip phone (rm 2)
[OP]
Deal Expert
Feb 24, 2018
20205 posts
23678 upvotes
csi123 wrote: I am not sure if i misunderstood your situation, but according to what you wrote above a simple wifi extender and a PoE injector is the easiest way to do it.

Keep in mind that a device connected to the Ethernet port of the extender is not subject to additional latency unlike devices that connect to the extender via wifi. The additional latency comes from the fact that most extenders only have one air interface so it can only talk to either the source wifi network or its clients but not both at the same time. The Ethernet port of course doesn't use the air interface so there is no additional measurable latency.

A simple PoE injector will take care of the power requirement in room 2 as mentioned.

In case it isn't clear you need these:

Wifi router/AP -> wifi extender (rm 2) -> PoE injector (rm 2) -> Voip phone (rm 2)
Here's the complete setup
Bell VOIP device => PoE+ Switch => Wired RJ45 run to Room 1 (and other rooms)

This is my proposal
RJ45 PoE+ Outlet (Room 1) ==> Non-PoE'ed Powerline Device (Room 1) ==> Non-PoE'ed Powerline Device (Room 2)
==> PoE+ Injector ==> VOIP phone

My solution doesn't require configuration with the WiFi network. It requires a super-simple PoE device-to-device connection. It's also very cost effective because no one wants powerline anymore because WiFi routers are generally superior. Finally, it avoids the one-point-of-failure situation with all things flowing through the WiFi router, as long as the Bell VOIP device is connected to the internet (independent of the WiFi router), we're solid.
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Sep 16, 2013
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redflagdealsguy wrote: Here's the complete setup
Bell VOIP device => PoE+ Switch => Wired RJ45 run to Room 1 (and other rooms)
That's what I thought earlier. Take that PoE switch to room 2 and connect the Ethernet cable directly to the VOIP device in room 1. You can use the PoE switch instead of an injector in room 2.
[OP]
Deal Expert
Feb 24, 2018
20205 posts
23678 upvotes
alpovs wrote: That's what I thought earlier. Take that PoE switch to room 2 and connect the Ethernet cable directly to the VOIP device in room 1. You can use the PoE switch instead of an injector in room 2.
Maybe I wasn't explaining myself clearly, my apologies.

The PoE+ Switch is centrally located and feeds to multiple rooms through an access in the wall. It cannot be moved without compromising access to all the rooms it feeds, and to the Bell VOIP device, and the Bell VOIP device itself cannot move because it must access Cisco VOIP hardware (some proprietary device) which taps into yet another proprietary device that I can't make heads or tails. All these items are stuck in their location for expediency and practicality's sake.

So from my book: The Powerline solution + PoE Injection seems like the easy win.
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Sep 16, 2013
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But do you need PoE in other rooms? I assumed if you are moving one phone other rooms don't have VOIP phones. You can replace the PoE switch with a regular one in room 1. Edit: But if your PoE switch has many ports and feeds many cables then an injector is definitely better than replacing the switch.
[OP]
Deal Expert
Feb 24, 2018
20205 posts
23678 upvotes
alpovs wrote: But do you need PoE in other rooms? I assumed if you are moving one phone other rooms don't have VOIP phones. You can replace the PoE switch with a regular one in room 1. Edit: But if your PoE switch has many ports and feeds many cables then an injector is definitely better than replacing the switch.
All of the rooms use PoE for their respective VOIP phones. The PoE+ switch drives it all.
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Sep 16, 2013
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redflagdealsguy wrote: All of the rooms use PoE for their respective VOIP phones. The PoE+ switch drives it all.
Oh, I see. If you were adding a phone to room 2 I would have thought that you other rooms might have other VOIP phones. But since you are moving one phone I assumed that you have only one. Then I agree that your plan with an injector is the best. I wouldn't worry about added latency. And since your phone doesn't need gigabit I would check to see if there is a way to limit your powerline device to 100 Mbps to make the connection more stable.
[OP]
Deal Expert
Feb 24, 2018
20205 posts
23678 upvotes
alpovs wrote: Oh, I see. If you were adding a phone to room 2 I would have thought that you other rooms might have other VOIP phones. But since you are moving one phone I assumed that you have only one. Then I agree that your plan with an injector is the best. I wouldn't worry about added latency. And since your phone doesn't need gigabit I would check to see if there is a way to limit your powerline device to 100 Mbps to make the connection more stable.
If reducing Powerline to 100mbps makes it more stable, I will do so. Thank you.
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Member
Feb 9, 2008
282 posts
221 upvotes
Vancouver, BC
Just a warning that powerline is very hit or miss and can have big speed differences even with outlets in the same room.

Also, try not to plug it next to a cable TV box or coaxial outlet...
The cable company randomly showed up saying a lot of interference was coming from my house and they had to do some testing.
It was resolved after I moved the powerline adapter away from the TV.
[OP]
Deal Expert
Feb 24, 2018
20205 posts
23678 upvotes
zerod wrote: Just a warning that powerline is very hit or miss and can have big speed differences even with outlets in the same room.

Also, try not to plug it next to a cable TV box or coaxial outlet...
The cable company randomly showed up saying a lot of interference was coming from my house and they had to do some testing.
It was resolved after I moved the powerline adapter away from the TV.
I've examined the speed differences and I'm not concerned. Consistency and reliability is important for phone calls however, so if I get added redundancy at 100mbps I may set it to that throughput.
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Sep 16, 2013
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redflagdealsguy wrote: I've examined the speed differences and I'm not concerned. Consistency and reliability is important for phone calls however, so if I get added redundancy at 100mbps I may set it to that throughput.
Can you run a cable? Through a return duct for example. Or on the floor. If you want reliability Ethernet is the best. Powerline is kind of WiFi over power lines (different frequencies). I used to run powerline devices years ago. I bet new standards are better now. At that time they were mostly stable but rebooted from time to time on their own. Computer traffic would just freeze for a minute, then resume. I got sick of that and ran cables.

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