Automotive

Portable Car Jump Starter Master Thread

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  • Feb 4th, 2022 5:08 pm
[OP]
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Aug 25, 2006
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Heads up, GOOLOO unit is on sale for $76.49. Limited Time Offer. Yikes.
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Jul 2, 2001
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Made my own jump starter battery pack...
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[OP]
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Aug 25, 2006
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shabby wrote: Made my own jump starter battery pack...
Now that is pretty cool. Is it safe? lol
Dustler6 wrote: Saw this on primecables https://www.primecables.ca/primecables- ... #sku393754 ferom $80 - $60. Got a good 21 reviews.
$60 is a good price. But like I said, the GOOLOO is at $76.49 right now on Amazon Canada. This gives you a slightly bigger brand and the unit has more peak (& assumed cranking amps). The PC one is also 10000mAh and the GOOLOO is 18000mAh. Hope that helps.
Deal Expert
Jan 15, 2006
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Richmond Hill
Lithium powered ones are pretty useless IMO. For one, they don't like to be fully charged and will degrade fast. Second, they are horrible in sub-zero temps and again the battery will degrade in hot temps (if this is left in the car).
Lithium is great for the size and portability, but that's pretty much it.
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bowmah wrote:
Now that is pretty cool. Is it safe? lol


Safe? Suuuure Smiling Face With Open Mouth And Cold Sweat
billford wrote:
Interesting setup.

That looks like a 18 volt battery connecting to a 12 volt car. Any issues with the car or jumper battery? Or are you reducing the jumper battery voltage?
Not reducing anything, I've used it a few times and it does work pretty well.
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Sep 1, 2004
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shabby wrote: Made my own jump starter battery pack...
Cool. So you save $80 on a booster by risk ruining a $140 battery.

That said, power tool manufacturers should just build a protective circuit to plug the battery in to boost cars.

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Xtrema wrote: Cool. So you save $80 on a booster by risk ruining a $140 battery.

That said, power tool manufacturers should just build a protective circuit to plug the battery in to boost cars.

If I connect it the wrong way that's my fault, so far I'm not that stupid.
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[OP]
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Aug 25, 2006
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Update on the GOOLOO unit linked in the first post: https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B06X9R ... M3VY&psc=1

I am skeptical of such a small unit as well. This thing has an 800A peak output and but more importantly, like closer to 300-350A in cranking amps. This is not that much. In addition to the guy in the reviews who started his car in a snowy condition as well as the tester who started his JEEP without a battery (not recommended to do this of course), here is some anecdotal experience. Just received the unit this morning and charged it up to the max. Downside, you can only charge it via the 15v/1A input port which is only compatible with the provided wall charger and accessory socket (cigarette lighter) charger. So I assume charging an 18000 mAh battery from 0% would be quite slow and require at least overnight charging. Once it's at 100%, took it to a buddy who has had an older car parked for 5 years with a totally dead battery. Once the GOOLOO unit was attached to the battery, no indicator lights. As per the instruction manual, this means the battery has gone bad. It also said to hold the ON/OFF Switch for a few seconds until the BOOST light (green light) stays on. Went through that and did 2 cranks on the old car. First crank would keep cranking but not start up the car. Did that for 5 seconds. Second crank started it right away. This car has not been started for 5 years and the car's battery was connected and left as is. The recommended battery for this car is rated at 590CCA so given this GOOLOO is only rated at Start Current of 350A (3 secs) and 300 Start Current of 300A (5 secs), it was still able start the car. Conclusion, this is not a severe condition as it's a car and not a massive truck engine and it's not below freezing. But in short, for $75 on sale right now, this unit is worth keeping. The only downside I can see is the lower cranking amps and only being able to charge via a slow 15v/1A port. The bright side of this slow charging port is you can charge it via the cigarette lighter plug that comes with the unit. Hope that helps, will update the original post as well.
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May 22, 2003
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I used this 500A one on my Golf R 3 times this winter when my battery died and it worked all 3 times. It did take a few times to start, but I think it was a battery issue (turns out it was faulty and replaced under warranty - towards the end, even hooking up to a wall starter wouldn't start it)

https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B07C22RPYC/
[OP]
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I am doing some reading and found this very helpful. This is beyond my expertise but maybe one of you guys will confirm or deny this. Let me rephrase and please correct any terms that may need it:

In general, if your car has a 1.6 kilowatt starter (1600 watts) , and your battery stays at 12 volts when cranking, then you will require 134CCA to start your car. If your batter drops to 10 volts, then you will need 160CCA to start your car. ie. 1600 watts / 10 volts = 160 AMPs. Can anyone confirm this general rule of thumb? If this is true, then once you know your starters wattage and guesstimate a dead battery's voltage (5 to 10 volts), then you can calculate the actual AMP needed then? If this is correct, then a 1.6 kW starter with a semi dead battery, say at 9 volts, only require 178 AMPS to start a car then?

Of course, this is under normal conditions, not in extreme cold. Can anyone comment on whether the above is accurate or not?
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Nov 7, 2016
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Ontario
Compression ratio, friction, weather, oil type, battery location, battery size, wiring size, etc all make a difference in how hard it is to start. Vehicles don't stay at 12V to start, usually around 10-11 or so due to the draw on the battery.

I've personally never seen one of those little starter packs work on anything bigger then a 4/6 cylinders in all the dozen+ or so times I've been around myself and others trying to use them. Usually need to break out the big booster packs for the bigger engines.
[OP]
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Aug 25, 2006
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IcarusLSC wrote: Compression ratio, friction, weather, oil type, battery location, battery size, wiring size, etc all make a difference in how hard it is to start. Vehicles don't stay at 12V to start, usually around 10-11 or so due to the draw on the battery.

I've personally never seen one of those little starter packs work on anything bigger then a 4/6 cylinders in all the dozen+ or so times I've been around myself and others trying to use them. Usually need to break out the big booster packs for the bigger engines.
This is why I started this thread so we can all learn a little bit more from one another. I am skeptical, and it was not easy finding a seller on Amazon that had a decent enough rating. From my own research, it seems the larger (hence more cranking amps) the unit it is, the better chance to start a larger engine under extreme conditions. This reviewer was quit negative on the GOOLOO 600A unit (older model). But he was able to start his JEEP WITHOUT the normal battery attached. See it here as I have linked directly to the part of the video where he was skeptical starting his JEEP without a battery:



Who knows how long these batteries will survive and if it will truly start a dead battery car in extreme cold weather. Good jump starters used to cost $200. It is only more recently that these Lithium Ion batteries come in at under $100. If you look at the extensive review in the first post, I would say half of these batteries do not provide enough cranking amps. Other RFD users have been helpful in providing other units that has worked for them. If more people can post the actual brand and unit, we can hopefully provide others in the same boat a decent buy for under $100.

Yes, the $200 units work but from I am seeing in my own research, it looks like the <$100 units work just as well in general, not under extreme conditions. What I find more interesting is the formula I provided above. I wonder if it can be used a a general guideline once you know the car's starter wattage requirement. I would say a dead battery from leaving lights on overnight drops to 10V. Is this correct? If so, then any jump starter with with 300 AMP would be sufficient for normal conditions. Will wait for someone more in the know to comment on the above formula.
[OP]
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Aug 25, 2006
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ToDealHunter wrote: Which model do you recommend between the Trekpow G22 1500A or the GOOLOO GP 1500A? Both of them at the same price right now $93.46 on amazon.

https://www.amazon.ca/ABOX-Starter-Upgr ... B07DGGG3GR


https://www.amazon.ca/GOOLOO-SuperSafe- ... B07QPT5NQL

Thanks in advance
I personally have no preference but I do see Gooloo has a larger online footprint (as a company) but has a few more complaints than Globmall CA on Amazon reviews. Whichever one you end up with, please post back with your feedback.
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Jan 18, 2013
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B.C.
I bought one of these last fall since I have a beater with an old battery and my second car is a Hybrid that I shouldn't boost anything with...

https://www.homehardware.ca/en/12-volt- ... /p/8720009

If you google the part number it shows the suppliers in china https://carku.en.alibaba.com/productgro ... er_65.html

I haven't had to boost anything with it yet though... I'm pretty much prepared to use it only to change my phone in a blackout.
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Jan 15, 2006
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Richmond Hill
I've repeated over and over again. The major issue with lithium ion batteries is that they don't like to remain at 100% charge and they also perform extremely poor in the cold. It really isn't ideal as an "emergency" booster.
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Mar 23, 2004
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bowmah wrote: Update on the GOOLOO unit linked in the first post: https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B06X9R ... M3VY&psc=1

I am skeptical of such a small unit as well. This thing has an 800A peak output and but more importantly, like closer to 300-350A in cranking amps. This is not that much.
You are right on the money. In fact if you look on the Gooloo unit itself, it says that the starting current is...300-350A, lol. The peak current is "800A" and also these current ratings are at 11.1V. However this is enough to start many vehicles esp. if the battery isn't completely flat, and the vehicle has no other "hard starting" issues.
ToDealHunter wrote: Which model do you recommend between the Trekpow G22 1500A or the GOOLOO GP 1500A? Both of them at the same price right now $93.46 on amazon.

https://www.amazon.ca/ABOX-Starter-Upgr ... B07DGGG3GR


https://www.amazon.ca/GOOLOO-SuperSafe- ... B07QPT5NQL
I have the second one, bought in BD sales or whatever. I believe it's using LiFePO4--I took it apart and it didn't look to me to be the same as the G1500 which was definitely Li-Ion-Poly. The reason I say "believe" is because I couldn't take it apart that far due to the tape/glue inside and not wanting to void the warranty. The G1500 isn't sold anymore (all links for it forward to the new GP2000), but I did have both the G1500 and GP1500 at one point and decided to return the G1500 and keep the GP1500. Note that the GP1500 has the totally different shape whereas the G1500, GP2000, and GP4000 have the "long, flat" design.

There were also other indicators that make me suspect the GP1500 is LiFePO4... If you look at the ratings beside the old G1500, you'll see both were rated for the same "1500A" peak current but the GP1500 has significantly lower watt-hours (capacity) and the same goes if you compare to the older style GP200, the GP1500 has lower capacity. This makes sense if it were using LiFePO4 cells because they do have lower capacity and lower nominal voltage. At the time the reg. price on the GP1500 was also higher than both the GP200 and the G1500.

It's really tough to tell when they don't specify what cells are in use other than perhaps a generic mention of "Li-Ion"--sure but what type of lithium-ion, is the question. I think they may also not specify because they continually change parts/cells in these things as you can see how the G1500 all of a sudden became the GP2000.

As a point of reference, if it hasn't been mentioned here already... LiFePO4 or Lithium-iron phosphate cells have 10-15% lower energy density (meaning less capacity/storage for its mass/volume) and lower nominal voltage as compared to more "regular" Li-Ion types. However LiFePO4 is much better suited to a booster pack for a variety of reasons. Iron-phosphate has a much higher cycle life; handles temperature extremes better (more output in the cold and with less degredation at higher temperatures); the voltage during discharge remains more flat/steady against the load (they have a discharge curve more akin to NiMH or NiCd chemistries); the peak output/current capability is higher; finally, it has lower self-discharge. NB: To me this kind of pointed to why the lower-capacity GP1500 would have the same type of current rating as the larger G1500. For a booster pack, LiFePO4 is more rugged and durable and can output the same current in a smaller package, or more current in a similarly sized package. That last bit also leads me to believe the GP4000 would have to be iron-phosphate as well, because it's the same size as the G1500 but has a markedly higher output (100% more) with only a relatively small increase in capacity (35% more).

Only thing is these are all just guesses for the most part. I previously had a theory that the ones with the letter "P" were using iron-phosphate, but the glaring exception to this is the GP180/GP200 series design which are the oldest design I believe and have always quite clearly been standard Li-Ion-Ploy. So really...who knows what cells they are putting in what packs?

Anywayyy..., I never had to actually use either the G1500 or the GP1500. Like any booster you're only gonna find out how well it works if/when you need it :lol:

As for the TrekPow, as bowmah put it, Gooloo seems to have more of a market "presence" and history, but who knows how much that really means as I imagine either could close up shop and disappear overnight; however, it seems less likely with Gooloo. Again with TrekPow they don't specify what specific battery type is being used but I would imagine standard poly cells are in use. That TrekPow seems to have a pretty similar design to the Gooloo "long, flat" design of the G1500, etc. units.
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Jun 14, 2008
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EP32k2 wrote: I've repeated over and over again. The major issue with lithium ion batteries is that they don't like to remain at 100% charge and they also perform extremely poor in the cold. It really isn't ideal as an "emergency" booster.
Check the video Project Farm did on these, even after being frozen to -18, they can actually warm themselves up quickly into operating temperature on 3rd crank or so. I was quite surprised too.

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