Cell Phones

Porting Out From Fongo to a Cellular Provider | Query

  • Last Updated:
  • Nov 30th, 2021 11:17 pm
[OP]
Sr. Member
Nov 25, 2019
519 posts
718 upvotes
Edmonton

Porting Out From Fongo to a Cellular Provider | Query

When we use voip/virtual numbers like text now/fongo etc we cannot receive OTP text messages from banks, Uber, whatsapp and similar services.

Few months back I was i just trying to register with fongo and it randomly gave me the last 5 digits that i wanted so i took that.

If I port the number out to lets say fido, will i still have same otp issue ? I wana understand if this detection thing that this number is voip is network based or number series based. ?

-----------------------------------

Another query

I recently move from ON to AB and don't wana pay 13% for the rest of my life so considering changing the number. I live in Edmonton and the fongo number i got is from canmore (based on area).

Does it really affect if my area code is a canmore and i live in Edmonton or Calgary ? Like people avoiding calls or something ??

I was previously thinking of changing my number when few months back when i moved from Toronto to Edmonton but didnt. I dont face any issue but just thinking may be its because its from a popular toronto area and canmore may be a different story.

---------------------------------------

From what i understand, since my current number is from Toronto area I most likely be charged 13% tax, some providers may change but its YMMV and for prepaid providers its sure shot 13%. and every time i change provider, i will have same problem.

If anyone have experience abt this, please guide.

I am currently with Lucky.
Lucky Mobile $25 plan with 6GB
Freedom Mobile $99/Year Nationwide
Fido 4GB data only plan
4 replies
Deal Fanatic
Aug 27, 2004
7608 posts
1026 upvotes
Toronto, ON
PrivacyIsIllusion wrote: Does it really affect if my area code is a canmore and i live in Edmonton or Calgary ? Like people avoiding calls or something ??

I was previously thinking of changing my number when few months back when i moved from Toronto to Edmonton but didnt. I dont face any issue but just thinking may be its because its from a popular toronto area and canmore may be a different story.
In my view, having a phone number in a rate centre that is long distance from where you live is a bit of an asshole move. There are plenty of people/organizations out there, particularly with TDM services, who don't have flat-rate long distance even in 2021 - do you really want your kid's school or your doctor or mechanic or whatever having to pay long distance to call you?

According to localcallingguide.com, Canmore, AB is only local to Banff, AB, Exshaw, AB, and Kanaskaskis, AB, FYI.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Nov 25, 2019
519 posts
718 upvotes
Edmonton
VivienM wrote: In my view, having a phone number in a rate centre that is long distance from where you live is a bit of an asshole move. There are plenty of people/organizations out there, particularly with TDM services, who don't have flat-rate long distance even in 2021 - do you really want your kid's school or your doctor or mechanic or whatever having to pay long distance to call you?

According to localcallingguide.com, Canmore, AB is only local to Banff, AB, Exshaw, AB, and Kanaskaskis, AB, FYI.
I always thought that you just need to dial an extra 1 before the number that's it. I didn't know the rates are different too. Good to know.
So Canmore definitely isn't a good idea. For that matter any number outside your area is not a good idea.
So i should ideally get a new number that belongs to the area

Thanks.
Lucky Mobile $25 plan with 6GB
Freedom Mobile $99/Year Nationwide
Fido 4GB data only plan
Deal Fanatic
Aug 27, 2004
7608 posts
1026 upvotes
Toronto, ON
PrivacyIsIllusion wrote: I always thought that you just need to dial an extra 1 before the number that's it. I didn't know the rates are different too. Good to know.
So Canmore definitely isn't a good idea. For that matter any number outside your area is not a good idea.
So i should ideally get a new number that belongs to the area
Not sure how old you are, but... let me give you a quick history lesson:
- once upon a time, land lines were cheap and long distance was expensive. The monopoly phone companies (ILECs) (Bell, the companies that became Telus, etc) basically used long distance revenue to subsidize basic land line service with (unlike in European countries) unlimited local calling. This was, if anything, encouraged by regulators like the CRTC. There were long distance rates printed in the phone books based on time of day - evenings/weekends were cheaper, etc.
- then, in the mid-90s, government decided to introduce competition in long distance. Basically, Bell/Telus/etc are required to connect your calls to your choice of long distance carrier, so if your phone line is listed as, say, Sprint Canada (an outfit that Rogers bought out in the mid-2000s) for long distance, when you dial 1+xxx, that call goes to Sprint's equipment and they send you a bill. Lots of turmoil as various companies entered, exited, etc the market, but generally things landed at a maximum of $20/month for unlimitedish long distance by about 2000.
- cell phones did not have long distance competition; most plans you had to pay extra for long distance and both ways. Outbound calls based on your physical location (if you were physically in Kingston, you could make outbound calls to Kingston without paying long distance, but calls to Toronto or Ottawa you would pay long distance); inbound calls based on the relationship between your phone number and your location (so if you had a Toronto phone number and you received an inbound call while in Toronto, that wasn't billed LD, but if you drove out to Hamilton and received a call there, it would be)
(Also, in those days, you paid cell phone carriers for 'airtime' or got a bundle of minutes with your plan.)
And in those days, people were acutely aware of their cell phone number's geographic location - for, say, students living in another city, this was a big big deal. Can't remember what the LD rates were when - I think 20-55 cents/minute at various times and on various plans? (And in those days, all students had land lines)
- towards the late 2000s, local phone service was deregulated. Net result is that land line prices went way way up (I paid $22/month for a basic land line when I was in undergrad in 2002, now the same thing from Bell, provided with the same ol' DMS-100 equipment, is like $50/month), but at least in residential, started sometimes being bundled with long distance. Sometimes not. But this contributed to the decline of standalone long distance plans - I don't know when is the last time that I saw Primus or Distributel (the main survivors of the late-1990s competitive market) advertising a long distance plan. I think in theory you can still sign up for a land line from Bell and then get a long distance plan from those guys, but they would probably look at you like you're crazy and tell you they haven't signed up a new LD customer in 5 years.
- in the early 2010s, the CRTC introduced its wireless code of conduct and the cellular industry made a move towards unlimited voice plans - those plans not only included unlimited airtime but also typically unlimited long distance. Since then, while we've seen the occasional exception, most cellular plans have included unlimited long distance. This was not the norm, at least for consumer plans, before then.
This, along with number portability, appears to have led to an American-style (they started having flat-rate cellular long distance and unlimited voice at least a decade before us) culture of treating numbers as distinct from geography and so you start to see people keeping their cell phone numbers as they move around even though those numbers are not local to where they now live.
- TDM services, e.g. analog land lines, PRI, etc, are very much tied into the regulatory framework for long distance competition - the expectation is that you can get your phone service from X (whether it's the ILEC like Bell/Telus or a CLEC like Allstream or Rogers) and then X routes 1+xxx long distance calls to your choice of long distance carrier. Also TDM switches will not let you dial a long distance number without the 1+ (unlike cell phones or IP switches) - this is how you as the end user know whether something is an unlimited local call or a billable long distance call. So generally speaking, while long distance costs have gone down, at least for cautious shoppers, long distance tends to still be metered/billed in some way. Also, if you get a basic Bell line without ANY long distance plan, you will pay the old rates from the phone book or even higher rates (I just checked Bell's web site - for residential and 81+ miles distance, it's $1.33/minute for peak, $1.13 for off-peak!!!).
The norm for newer SIP-based services, though, has typically been flat rate long distance.

(Note - I am mostly talking about Canadian long distance here. Long distance calls to U.S. or other NANP countries' area codes are typically billed more and not included in most of the flat-rate LD plans out there)

Anyways, all this is to say that there are decades of regulations and history behind this, including this noble attempt to separate out local and long distance services in order to create competition in long distance services, and that yes, in my view, if you are going to receive inbound calls, you cannot assume that your callers (especially old-school mom-and-pop-type business like a doctor or mechanic that, in the days before widespread use of non-local-cell phones, would only be making calls to people with local numbers) won't be paying long distance for those calls.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Nov 25, 2019
519 posts
718 upvotes
Edmonton
VivienM wrote: Not sure how old you are, but... let me give you a quick history lesson:
- once upon a time, land lines were cheap and long distance was expensive. The monopoly phone companies (ILECs) (Bell, the companies that became Telus, etc) basically used long distance revenue to subsidize basic land line service with (unlike in European countries) unlimited local calling. This was, if anything, encouraged by regulators like the CRTC. There were long distance rates printed in the phone books based on time of day - evenings/weekends were cheaper, etc.
- then, in the mid-90s, government decided to introduce competition in long distance. Basically, Bell/Telus/etc are required to connect your calls to your choice of long distance carrier, so if your phone line is listed as, say, Sprint Canada (an outfit that Rogers bought out in the mid-2000s) for long distance, when you dial 1+xxx, that call goes to Sprint's equipment and they send you a bill. Lots of turmoil as various companies entered, exited, etc the market, but generally things landed at a maximum of $20/month for unlimitedish long distance by about 2000.
- cell phones did not have long distance competition; most plans you had to pay extra for long distance and both ways. Outbound calls based on your physical location (if you were physically in Kingston, you could make outbound calls to Kingston without paying long distance, but calls to Toronto or Ottawa you would pay long distance); inbound calls based on the relationship between your phone number and your location (so if you had a Toronto phone number and you received an inbound call while in Toronto, that wasn't billed LD, but if you drove out to Hamilton and received a call there, it would be)
(Also, in those days, you paid cell phone carriers for 'airtime' or got a bundle of minutes with your plan.)
And in those days, people were acutely aware of their cell phone number's geographic location - for, say, students living in another city, this was a big big deal. Can't remember what the LD rates were when - I think 20-55 cents/minute at various times and on various plans? (And in those days, all students had land lines)
- towards the late 2000s, local phone service was deregulated. Net result is that land line prices went way way up (I paid $22/month for a basic land line when I was in undergrad in 2002, now the same thing from Bell, provided with the same ol' DMS-100 equipment, is like $50/month), but at least in residential, started sometimes being bundled with long distance. Sometimes not. But this contributed to the decline of standalone long distance plans - I don't know when is the last time that I saw Primus or Distributel (the main survivors of the late-1990s competitive market) advertising a long distance plan. I think in theory you can still sign up for a land line from Bell and then get a long distance plan from those guys, but they would probably look at you like you're crazy and tell you they haven't signed up a new LD customer in 5 years.
- in the early 2010s, the CRTC introduced its wireless code of conduct and the cellular industry made a move towards unlimited voice plans - those plans not only included unlimited airtime but also typically unlimited long distance. Since then, while we've seen the occasional exception, most cellular plans have included unlimited long distance. This was not the norm, at least for consumer plans, before then.
This, along with number portability, appears to have led to an American-style (they started having flat-rate cellular long distance and unlimited voice at least a decade before us) culture of treating numbers as distinct from geography and so you start to see people keeping their cell phone numbers as they move around even though those numbers are not local to where they now live.
- TDM services, e.g. analog land lines, PRI, etc, are very much tied into the regulatory framework for long distance competition - the expectation is that you can get your phone service from X (whether it's the ILEC like Bell/Telus or a CLEC like Allstream or Rogers) and then X routes 1+xxx long distance calls to your choice of long distance carrier. Also TDM switches will not let you dial a long distance number without the 1+ (unlike cell phones or IP switches) - this is how you as the end user know whether something is an unlimited local call or a billable long distance call. So generally speaking, while long distance costs have gone down, at least for cautious shoppers, long distance tends to still be metered/billed in some way. Also, if you get a basic Bell line without ANY long distance plan, you will pay the old rates from the phone book or even higher rates (I just checked Bell's web site - for residential and 81+ miles distance, it's $1.33/minute for peak, $1.13 for off-peak!!!).
The norm for newer SIP-based services, though, has typically been flat rate long distance.

(Note - I am mostly talking about Canadian long distance here. Long distance calls to U.S. or other NANP countries' area codes are typically billed more and not included in most of the flat-rate LD plans out there)

Anyways, all this is to say that there are decades of regulations and history behind this, including this noble attempt to separate out local and long distance services in order to create competition in long distance services, and that yes, in my view, if you are going to receive inbound calls, you cannot assume that your callers (especially old-school mom-and-pop-type business like a doctor or mechanic that, in the days before widespread use of non-local-cell phones, would only be making calls to people with local numbers) won't be paying long distance for those calls.
Thanks a ton taking time and explaining all this.
I am 30+ but in Canada for little over 2 years and recently moved to Edmonton but still deciding between Edmonton and Calgary.
Telecom evolved way differently in Canada compared to my home country (India)

So for me best option seems to be, keep ON number for till i decide my final destination and change to a local number.
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Freedom Mobile $99/Year Nationwide
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