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Possible to use propane tank for fireplace and standby generator ?

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  • Feb 21st, 2021 4:56 pm
[OP]
Member
Mar 3, 2012
202 posts
102 upvotes
Montreal, QC

Possible to use propane tank for fireplace and standby generator ?

Hi,
I have a question. I plan to add a standby generator.
I will put a 420 gallon tank outside for fireplace and would like to use the tank to power my future Generac standby generator. Is there any issue to add a split valve to go fireplace and to generator ? The generator would power the house central furnace so don't plan to use the fireplace in case of power outage.

Well maybe for couple of min for sexy time.

Thanks !
7 replies
Newbie
Dec 27, 2014
94 posts
98 upvotes
Toronto, ON
I might be wrong here, I'm no professional but I have had propane powered generators at my last 3 houses. I believe the manufacturers recommend at least 2 x 420lb tanks to run them.

We had one installed a year and a half ago, and had to add a second tank (we had one already for a garage heater).

Just my experience...
Deal Fanatic
Jan 25, 2007
9617 posts
5016 upvotes
Paris
We have a 1000 gallon that powers 2 fireplaces, water heater, furnace and generac at the cottage.
[OP]
Member
Mar 3, 2012
202 posts
102 upvotes
Montreal, QC
Jerico wrote: We have a 1000 gallon that powers 2 fireplaces, water heater, furnace and generac at the cottage.
I presume you can use a split valve for that?
Deal Fanatic
Jan 25, 2007
9617 posts
5016 upvotes
Paris
deadtorights wrote: I presume you can use a split valve for that?
I actually dont remember… I think there is a manifold inside the cottage to be honest. Forgot, we actually have a BBQ line as well.

I looked at a house 5 mins outside of town and they were on propane with 2x450s and had the furnace, oven, BBQ, garage heater, 1 fireplace, water heater all hooked up. The stupid part was that gas ran by on the road 185 feet from the house. We had made an offer and I called union gas and they told me they would run a gas line based on existing for $1000 (first 100 feet were free at the time). I cant believe anyone in their right mind wouldnt do this. Conversion of existing appliance was going to be around $600. That was in 2009ish. We didnt buy it as there were a lot of issues with the house, but the people who did put a steel roof on it, fenced 2 acres, and STILL USE PROPANE. I cant even fathom how much money they could have saved switching to NG.
Deal Addict
Nov 17, 2012
3160 posts
2132 upvotes
Toronto
Whoever you hire to professionally hook it up can easily T off the line.

The better option is a manifold. I have a single 400 pound tank up at the cottage fueling the gas stove, water heater and grill. I added a propane fired Jotul 305 'woodstove' to the cottage this past year and had the gas fitters completely redo all the propane lines in the cottage.

They installed a single line from the tank to the crawlspace under the cottage where I have a manifold now. From that each run goes to each appliance.
Member
Dec 6, 2020
280 posts
253 upvotes
It's very common practice to supply multiple propane appliances from a single tank. Any installer can do this for you.

Where you may run into problems, however, is in that a 420 lbs tank might not be big enough to supply a generator. Propane tanks store liquid propane and can only produce gaseous propane--which is what propane-powered appliances burn--at a rate proportional to the capacity of the tank and the ambient temperature. A 420lbs tank might not be able to evaporate enough propane to keep a generator running.

Get in touch with Generac and ask what size of propane tank you need for the generator you want.

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