Food & Drink

Post Pics of Your BBQ'd Food Thread

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gr8dlr wrote: If center is rotting or yellow, cut/scoop it out. Perfect for stuffing then. I wouldn't do this BTW...just LOL'ing.

On a separate but related note, if anyone wants to learn to forage or is looking for some interesting activities. There's a guy who does foraging walks out in Stratford area.

Almost signed up for it when I was out there watching some plays but felt timing was too tight.

http://www.pucksplenty.com/

Our foraging treks take place across beautiful woodland trails just minutes from Stratford, Ontario with the purpose of educating participants in the art of identifying wild edibles and mushrooms, prudent harvesting and, in the end, appreciating their wonderful taste and health benefits.
For a wild mushroom, if I see rot, yellow or slug trails, it all gets tossed. Perfect or nothing for these for me.

Those were literally perfect.
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Been doing pizza every week since the last one. Still a lot to learn on the dough making/stretching side, but it's getting better. Latest pie using Ooni's classic pizza dough recipe which was really easy to work with but I just realized is only 60% hydration.
PXL_20210920_011911328-01.jpeg

Started putting the deflectors at felt level and raising the stone with a grill expander. The top is cooking much better, but now I'm struggling with temps and could only manage 500° yesterday. Between longer cook time at 500° and lower hydration dough, the crust ended up pretty dry.
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Strider wrote: Been doing pizza every week since the last one. Still a lot to learn on the dough making/stretching side, but it's getting better. Latest pie using Ooni's classic pizza dough recipe which was really easy to work with but I just realized is only 60% hydration.

PXL_20210920_011911328-01.jpeg


Started putting the deflectors at felt level and raising the stone with a grill expander. The top is cooking much better, but now I'm struggling with temps and could only manage 500° yesterday. Between longer cook time at 500° and lower hydration dough, the crust ended up pretty dry.
Oooo i think i know what the problem is.
You have pineapple on your pizza.

Lol jk
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UrbanPoet wrote: Oooo i think i know what the problem is.
You have pineapple on your pizza.

Lol jk
Smiling Face With Open Mouth And Smiling Eyes
Can definitely blame the sophisticated palette of my 5 year old for that.
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Strider wrote: Smiling Face With Open Mouth And Smiling Eyes
Can definitely blame the sophisticated palette of my 5 year old for that.
Must be an East West thing.

Hawaiian pizzas are the bomb. Everyone on this coast grew up eating them.
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b31770 wrote: Must be an East West thing.

Hawaiian pizzas are the bomb. Everyone on this coast grew up eating them.
Oh its popular here too. Its just a thing people poke fun at.
Theres always have Hawaiian slices @ shops that sell take out single slices.
I was actually a huge Hawaiian pizza fan as a kid up until early university years.
After that my taste changed.
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UrbanPoet wrote: Oh its popular here too. Its just a thing people poke fun at.
Theres always have Hawaiian slices @ shops that sell take out single slices.
I was actually a huge Hawaiian pizza fan as a kid up until early university years.
After that my taste changed.
Nobody bats an eye here since we've been eating Hawaiian and sushi since toddler age lol.

I think some of us assume that back east and the US never had pineapple pizzas since it gets brought up so often.

Now grits, or collard greens, is a thing here since it's not really served anywhere. Crawfish was a rarity until a few years ago too.
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b31770 wrote: Nobody bats an eye here since we've been eating Hawaiian and sushi since toddler age lol.

I think some of us assume that back east and the US never had pineapple pizzas since it gets brought up so often.

Now grits, or collard greens, is a thing here since it's not really served anywhere. Crawfish was a rarity until a few years ago too.
Wait. Where are you from? East coast Canada or southern USA?

I love southern food… although i can only replicate it.
I havent made chicken fried steak and white gravy in a while…
I tried making cray fish but 100% not the same… only crayfish you can get in GTA is frozen, cooked, and overly salted ugh.

I saw on duck dynasty… they just get a big bag full of them. Like a big sack!
They’re live too… clipping around. Must be so sweet and tasty fresh like that.
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UrbanPoet wrote: Wait. Where are you from? East coast Canada or southern USA?

I love southern food… although i can only replicate it.
I havent made chicken fried steak and white gravy in a while…
I tried making cray fish but 100% not the same… only crayfish you can get in GTA is frozen, cooked, and overly salted ugh.

I saw on duck dynasty… they just get a big bag full of them. Like a big sack!
They’re live too… clipping around. Must be so sweet and tasty fresh like that.
West coast is the best coast!

Only chance I get to experience Southern'ish food was during trips to Seattle and thereabouts. But I'm a huge fan of grits, collard greens, tailgates, and anything American lol.

You really can't duplicate everything in Canada for some reason.
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UrbanPoet wrote: Wait. Where are you from? East coast Canada or southern USA?

I love southern food… although i can only replicate it.
I havent made chicken fried steak and white gravy in a while…
I tried making cray fish but 100% not the same… only crayfish you can get in GTA is frozen, cooked, and overly salted ugh.

I saw on duck dynasty… they just get a big bag full of them. Like a big sack!
They’re live too… clipping around. Must be so sweet and tasty fresh like that.
You can buy live crawfish here in the GTA but the price is same or higher than lobster. Not sure about you but I'd eat the much bigger cousin in that scenario as taste is better (I've eaten crawfish in New Orleans b4).
We're all bozos on the bus until we find a way to express ourselves...

Failure is always an option...just not the preferred one!
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Did the serious eats jerk chicken recipe/technique. Turned out some amazing chicken. Used a bit of apple wood along with the bay leaves/allspice berries. Only issue I had was losing a bit too much of the crust at the end when putting the chicken over the hot side of the grill to finish them off. Not sure if that had anything to do with adding some marinade an hour in to the cook, maybe should have loaded it all on right at the start.

Smelt amazing while cooking. Want to give jerk pork a go, wondering if I just do the exact same thing but with some pork.
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This was a recently smoked beef brisket. The whole brisket was about 15 lbs. This is the point portion, about 9 lbs precook weight. The brisket was dry seasoned with Montreal steak spice and coarse ground pepper corn for 36 hours in the fridge. The cooking was done on a Kamado Joe Jr using Kamado Joe brand charcoal, mesquite wood for flavor, cooking temperature about 235°F, wrapped in butcher paper at 160°F, final cook to 203°F. This is my second brisket, so I think doing well. Still a ways to go to rank with the pitmasters.
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will888 wrote: This was a recently smoked beef brisket. The whole brisket was about 15 lbs. This is the point portion, about 9 lbs precook weight. The brisket was dry seasoned with Montreal steak spice and coarse ground pepper corn for 36 hours in the fridge. The cooking was done on a Kamado Joe Jr using Kamado Joe brand charcoal, mesquite wood for flavor, cooking temperature about 235°F, wrapped in butcher paper at 160°F, final cook to 203°F. This is my second brisket, so I think doing well. Still a ways to go to rank with the pitmasters.
Looks good to me, but I will let the Poetic Guy from the City give the final judgement.
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Gutty96 wrote: Looks good to me, but I will let the Poetic Guy from the City give the final judgement.
Not bad for a 2nd try!

Competition bbq Urbanpoet says. Barq could use more development.
Gotta see the bend test on a flat slice to see how tender it is.

Backyard bbq Urbanpoet says great!
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UrbanPoet wrote: Not bad for a 2nd try!

Competition bbq Urbanpoet says. Barq could use more development.
Gotta see the bend test on a flat slice to see how tender it is.

Backyard bbq Urbanpoet says great!
I agree the bark could be more developed. What I did was throw thinly sliced fat trimmings on top of the brisket about an hour before I wrapped. I did not remove the fat trimming when I wrapped. I got this idea because the mad scientist on youtube likes to use wagyu tallow for his briskets. This was my attempt at a poor man's adaptation of wagyu tallow. Anyway, the fat trimmings affected the bark. As for the bend test, it was very bendy. No issues with the tenderness.
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will888 wrote: I agree the bark could be more developed. What I did was throw thinly sliced fat trimmings on top of the brisket about an hour before I wrapped. I did not remove the fat trimming when I wrapped. I got this idea because the mad scientist on youtube likes to use wagyu tallow for his briskets. This was my attempt at a poor man's adaptation of wagyu tallow. Anyway, the fat trimmings affected the bark. As for the bend test, it was very bendy. No issues with the tenderness.
Ahhh. I see. Thats for sure why. Fat trimmings vs tallow are totally different story.
Its pieces of fat tissue, vs rendered fat.
While using wagyu tallow is luxurious. It doesn’t necessarily have to be wagyu tallow.
It can be animal fat substance like butter.
Or even just plain beef tallow.
What they’re really doing is a hybrid method of a culinary technique used in other types of cuisine. Especially French cooking. “Confit”. Thats pretty much whats going on.

Try it. Make some beef tallow. You’ll have tons of fatty trimmings with every brisket. So you can get a cup easily.

One competition style trick i will share… using a cheap can of spray oil rather than a water spritz bottle.
Spray a thin layer every 45 minutes.
Why? Oil has a higher evaporation temp. Point. It sticks and doesnt evaporate quickly. Yet still moisturizes and assist in dissipating heat evenly.
This allows me to hit it @ 275 for the smoking phase which i prefer. For me i find that temp allows me to build a deep rich barq.
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will888 wrote: I agree the bark could be more developed. What I did was throw thinly sliced fat trimmings on top of the brisket about an hour before I wrapped. I did not remove the fat trimming when I wrapped. I got this idea because the mad scientist on youtube likes to use wagyu tallow for his briskets. This was my attempt at a poor man's adaptation of wagyu tallow. Anyway, the fat trimmings affected the bark. As for the bend test, it was very bendy. No issues with the tenderness.
I personally think you are messing with it too much. For me 36 hours is a long time for the rub. I only open up to wrap. How long did your cook take, and what method did you use to rest?
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mdl.tor wrote: I personally think you are messing with it too much. For me 36 hours is a long time for the rub. I only open up to wrap. How long did your cook take, and what method did you use to rest?
I agree... 36 hours just isn't needed. You only need 1.

For competition BBQ... You go in with an untrimmed brisket to start! So you just dry rub the day of. Which isn't bad... Because its a myth that the flavor penetrates the meat. It doesn't. It just stays on the outside. Injection is what really gets the flavour into the meat.
It could aid in a bit of tenderization as the salts pull out moisture from the meat, and its possible it gets sucked back in through osmosis. similar but not exactly a brine effect. But the effects are minimal with brisket flavor wise.

I always just

-trim
-inject
-dry rub
-wait an hour
-start cooking.

Sometimes I'll do trim/inject/dry rub, the night before... But that's more to save time. So I wake up and start cooking. Usually do this for events and gatherings. So I'm not late with the cooking.



Here is Urban Poet's quick guide to a perfect brisket. Follow the steps and even a beginner can get a perfect one!

1. TRIM fat down to a 1/4 inch. Especially dig out all that fat in-between the point/brisket. this fat never renders down. Being tucked in there it just turns into a soggy fatty mess in-between there. Don't worry if trim isn't perfect. This takes practice. The bigger picture is just to get rid of some fat, because brisket always has a lot on top.

2. INJECT! Injection can just simply be beef broth. If you want to get fancy mix in dry rub into your injection.

3. DRY RUB! Salt + pepper + garlic is the basic. So many dry rubs out there. So just pick one. No biggy.

4. SMOKE! Place fat side down. Smoke @ 275 until you hit an internal temperature of 160. Spritz every 45 minutes with a water bottle. Just a light mist.
Or you can substitute the water bottle with a can of cheap butter flavored spray oil. This is one of my competition secrets I will share. It helps develop a rich and deep bark. Allows you to hit it with smoke @ 275 without drying it out.
You can skip the spritzing every 45 minutes if you like... Makes it a more hands off approach and easier... But I recommend getting at least 1 spritzing during the smoking phase.

5. WRAP! You can do this anywhere from 230-275. I prefer 275. You can do foil or butcher paper wrap. Before closing the wrap pour a cup of beef broth all over the flat side.
Cook wrapped until 205 ish. However... Only use this temperature as a GUIDE. Not a hard rule.
What you want to do... Is actually check for tenderness. Poke a skewer into the flat. It should go in very smoothly, like the texture of peanut butter.

6. REST! Take it out... Leave it wrapped. Let it rest @ minimum 1 hour in a cooler.

7. Time to slice! I enjoy separating point from flat. I cut the point pieces into cubes, and flat into slices. You can make burnt endz with the points. Or just leave them as is. Both are delicious.
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UrbanPoet wrote: Ahhh. I see. Thats for sure why. Fat trimmings vs tallow are totally different story.
Its pieces of fat tissue, vs rendered fat.
While using wagyu tallow is luxurious. It doesn’t necessarily have to be wagyu tallow.
It can be animal fat substance like butter.
Or even just plain beef tallow.
What they’re really doing is a hybrid method of a culinary technique used in other types of cuisine. Especially French cooking. “Confit”. Thats pretty much whats going on.

Try it. Make some beef tallow. You’ll have tons of fatty trimmings with every brisket. So you can get a cup easily.

One competition style trick i will share… using a cheap can of spray oil rather than a water spritz bottle.
Spray a thin layer every 45 minutes.
Why? Oil has a higher evaporation temp. Point. It sticks and doesnt evaporate quickly. Yet still moisturizes and assist in dissipating heat evenly.
This allows me to hit it @ 275 for the smoking phase which i prefer. For me i find that temp allows me to build a deep rich barq.
Thanks for the tip. I have a $4 oil spray bottle from dollarama. I suppose I could spray my favorite cooking oil on the brisket instead of apple cider vinegar/apple juice mixture.

I thought that lower temperature allows for a longer cook and deeper smoke ring and bark development. So the higher cooking temperature which would promote a shorter cook time will not be detrimental?
Last edited by will888 on Sep 24th, 2021 12:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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mdl.tor wrote: I personally think you are messing with it too much. For me 36 hours is a long time for the rub. I only open up to wrap. How long did your cook take, and what method did you use to rest?
I just thought that it would allow the flavoring to penetrate a little more into the meat. Next time I will do injection instead of dry brining.

The cooking took about 13 hours. Rest was about 3 hours. I kept the meat wrapped in butcher paper (no towels and cooler stuff) and monitored cool down with the temperature probe.
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