Food & Drink

Post Pics of Your BBQ'd Food Thread

  • Last Updated:
  • Dec 8th, 2019 7:18 pm
Sr. Member
Jan 15, 2007
936 posts
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Richmond Hill
butcher your ribs with the smoke rings coming on both sides looks amazing.i wish i could become a decent bbq'er but i must confess i am terrified of propane bbq's.(personal fears) lol~
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Mar 12, 2008
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Wow you guys are amazing. The extent of my cooking is toasting some bread, slapping a piece of cheese in the middle, and putting it in the microwave.
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Nov 17, 2007
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omg i can smell the bbq just from looking at the pictures! reminds me of summer
LordofthePing wrote:
Mar 14th, 2010 5:05 am
Wow you guys are amazing. The extent of my cooking is toasting some bread, slapping a piece of cheese in the middle, and putting it in the microwave.
lol you could of saved yourself a step by toasting the bread with the cheese in the middle.
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Sep 25, 2006
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Whitby
PennyArcade wrote:
Mar 13th, 2010 7:37 pm
Nice Pics!

I hear it is hard to find Pork Butts around here in Toronto. Where did you guys get them and for how much?
Pork Butts will be available from most Asian butcher shops, Highland Farms usually carries them as well. If you ask your local grocery store they will more than likely have them as well. They usually cut them into 'blade chops' for quick grilling. I get mine from the Neilson Rd No Frills. There is a Charlie's Meats outlet in there and they've always been good to me. Last time I was there the older Asian butcher told me next time I wanted a big order to let him know in advance and he'd place my order when the meat prices were the lowest to save me money..... Can't beat that!

Other than Brisket, they've got everything I need...

Pork Butt is usually less than $2 per pound it varies on the pork market.... Sometimes it's closer to $1 and sometimes it's closer to $2 per pound.
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Dec 30, 2006
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Mar 11, 2005
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Wow...all these pics look incredible.

*drools all over keyboard*

- JiE
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Feb 16, 2010
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Wow, these pictures are fabulous. They would put most recipe books to shame.
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Jucius Maximus wrote:
Mar 13th, 2010 8:06 pm
Beers are at my place. (Fridge full of Czechvar!)
Maybe we should have an Unofficial RFD Mississauga BBQ at my condo this Summer!
hell yeah, i'm in! czechvars are great!

hopefully its cabbing distance so i dont have to drive hehehe
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I've seen these just recently in the asian supermarket, i know theyre apparently popular at korean places (which ive never been to)... they're thin strips of ribs cut horizontally right?

what's the reccomended way of cooking those, other than smoking.. just grilling over direct heat? or do they need simmering or marinating and are very tough?

would like to try those out for a summer BBQ some time soon

thanks for the info!
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duckdown wrote:
Mar 14th, 2010 2:57 pm
I've seen these just recently in the asian supermarket, i know theyre apparently popular at korean places (which ive never been to)... they're thin strips of ribs cut horizontally right?

what's the reccomended way of cooking those, other than smoking.. just grilling over direct heat? or do they need simmering or marinating and are very tough?

would like to try those out for a summer BBQ some time soon

thanks for the info!
Yes, they are beef short ribs, usually from older cows (to get a larger bone). Korean's typically grill these over fairly high heat after marinating them. You need that caramelization of the sugars from the marinade. I have never seen these purely smoked before.

The one you see there is a "LA" style (probably named after the city of it's origin? There's a lot of Koreans there). There's another style labelled "Tong" or something like that (pic)

Another way to prepare these is to braise them in a pressure cooker, where they become more fall of the bone than a "steak". The sauce from this process is sooooo good over rice.
[OP]
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Apr 19, 2006
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I did a pot roast in a Dutch Oven on the BBQ this afternoon.

Roast seared and in the pot with potatoes, carrots, onions, beef stock and spices.
[IMG]http://i115.photobucket.com/albums/n302 ... C01980.jpg[/IMG]

After an hour or so:
[IMG]http://i115.photobucket.com/albums/n302 ... C01989.jpg[/IMG]

About three hours later:
[IMG]http://i115.photobucket.com/albums/n302 ... C01996.jpg[/IMG]

All done five hours later:
[IMG]http://i115.photobucket.com/albums/n302 ... C02000.jpg[/IMG]

Four adults and two kids destroyed the whole meal. Nothing left.

With the few remaining coals still burning and the egg still hot, I threw on a few chicken breasts for lunches during the week.
[IMG]http://i115.photobucket.com/albums/n302 ... C02003.jpg[/IMG]
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Sep 26, 2006
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Hambone wrote:
Mar 14th, 2010 9:36 pm
I did a pot roast in a Dutch Oven on the BBQ this afternoon.

Roast seared and in the pot with potatoes, carrots, onions, beef stock and spices.
[IMG]http://i115.photobucket.com/albums/n302 ... C01980.jpg[/IMG]

After an hour or so:
[IMG]http://i115.photobucket.com/albums/n302 ... C01989.jpg[/IMG]

About three hours later:
[IMG]http://i115.photobucket.com/albums/n302 ... C01996.jpg[/IMG]

All done five hours later:
[IMG]http://i115.photobucket.com/albums/n302 ... C02000.jpg[/IMG]

Four adults and two kids destroyed the whole meal. Nothing left.

With the few remaining coals still burning and the egg still hot, I threw on a few chicken breasts for lunches during the week.
[IMG]http://i115.photobucket.com/albums/n302 ... C02003.jpg[/IMG]
This may be a silly question, but does cooking that in a Dutch oven makes it any different than if you cook it in a pot over a stove or slow cooker?
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Whitby
duckdown wrote:
Mar 14th, 2010 2:57 pm
I've seen these just recently in the asian supermarket, i know theyre apparently popular at korean places (which ive never been to)... they're thin strips of ribs cut horizontally right?

what's the reccomended way of cooking those, other than smoking.. just grilling over direct heat? or do they need simmering or marinating and are very tough?

would like to try those out for a summer BBQ some time soon

thanks for the info!
These are short ribs cut flanken style. They can be chewy but a thin cut helps out a lot. They are really flavourful yet a fatty cut. I marinate them overnight and then put them over blazing high heat (charcoal preferably, but gas is good too) for a couple of minutes per side and they are crazy good.

I found this recipe a while back and it's my go to recipe for Kalbi:

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/stor ... Id=4793091
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May 22, 2005
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Thornhill
We need to have a RFD BBQ-fest, oh my god its midnight and I'm going to electrocute myself from drooling on the keyboard!


I'm not particularly good at BBQ'ing(no BBQ set, no backyard!), but I'll bring the beer! :lol:

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