Food & Drink

Post Pics of Your BBQ'd Food Thread

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Grilled corn Cuban/Mexican Style...basically it's grilled corn with a spicy mayonnaise (Mayo, cumin, cayenne, chili, garlic powder, tandoori masala, lime juice) and cheese (it's supposed to be cotija but I ddidn't have that so I used parmesan and feta). First time I've made this...it was amazingly good.

Corn was on sale at Longos for 10 cents a cob (Ontario)

http://www.theravenouscouple.com/2009/0 ... -corn.html

[IMG]http://img837.imageshack.us/img837/4315/anhq.jpg[/IMG]
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jayt90 wrote: This Brinkmann smoker is a knock off of the 18.5" Weber Smokey Mountain, and very effective for $50.

[IMG]http://img411.imageshack.us/img411/3021/img3097e.jpg[/IMG]
I was in Lowe's today and they have a version of this smoker for $78. It looks good, up to the job. It burns charcoal plus chips, easy to get.

The Brinkmann in the photo is hard to get in Canada, and over $100 now. The Weber Smoky Mountain is about $300, works on the same principle, but has the advantage of porcelain coated steel, instead of paint finish, so you can leave it out all winter.
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jayt90 wrote: I was in Lowe's today and they have a version of this smoker for $78. It looks good, up to the job. It burns charcoal plus chips, easy to get.

The Brinkmann in the photo is hard to get in Canada, and over $100 now. The Weber Smoky Mountain is about $300, works on the same principle, but has the advantage of porcelain coated steel, instead of paint finish, so you can leave it out all winter.
Link

Interesting...tempted to buy for $78.
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UrbanPoet wrote: I got a chicken in my electric smoker... Put it in this morning. I'll report later when i get home in the evening!

Today i'll be using mosquito wood chips. I didn't like the apple wood i used last time... Too subtle.
I know it's been over a month, but how did it turn out? Mesquite is usually recommended for beef. I find hickory gives you good smoke flavor without being overpowering.
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gr8dlr wrote: Grilled corn Cuban/Mexican Style...basically it's grilled corn with a spicy mayonnaise (Mayo, cumin, cayenne, chili, garlic powder, tandoori masala, lime juice) and cheese (it's supposed to be cotija but I ddidn't have that so I used parmesan and feta). First time I've made this...it was amazingly good.

Corn was on sale at Longos for 10 cents a cob (Ontario)

http://www.theravenouscouple.com/2009/0 ... -corn.html

[IMG]http://img837.imageshack.us/img837/4315/anhq.jpg[/IMG]
Got to try that, looks amazing.
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Has anyone tried Neapolitan style pizza on their bbq? Really getting the temp up, at 600 or higher? I'm trying to perfect this on my Kamado cooker. Anyways, will share results if and setup if I'm ever happy enough with it.
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neutral wrote: Has anyone tried Neapolitan style pizza on their bbq? Really getting the temp up, at 600 or higher? I'm trying to perfect this on my Kamado cooker. Anyways, will share results if and setup if I'm ever happy enough with it.
I have. And I kept burning it so gave up. Let us know if you figure it out.
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It's a bit of an art to cook pizza on the grill. Get a decent pizza stone and practice. You will burn pizzas, it's part of the learning process. Wood ovens burn much hotter than 600°F and they cook well (albeit in 4 minutes or so). Try some dough recipes, keep it thin, don't pile on the toppings.
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bonterra wrote: I have. And I kept burning it so gave up. Let us know if you figure it out.
Did you keep sugar out of the mix?
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Problem with Pizza on the grill is to get consistent high heat on the bottom and top. With a grill, I find there's just too much airspace to heatup when you open the grill to put in the pizza or when you check the pizza. You really need to create a heatsink relatively close to the top of the pizza to char that top.

I've been experimenting creating a "shelf" of firebricks above my pizza stone and it helps but I still need more time/work.

BTW I found a great source of education on CRAFTSY.com Peter Reinhart shows how to make dough. You have to create a login but there's a series of FREE lessons on there. I made the dough and it was very good and relatively easy...not no knead but not a lot of kneading...more stretch and folding.
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gr8dlr wrote: Grilled corn Cuban/Mexican Style...basically it's grilled corn with a spicy mayonnaise (Mayo, cumin, cayenne, chili, garlic powder, tandoori masala, lime juice) and cheese (it's supposed to be cotija but I ddidn't have that so I used parmesan and feta). First time I've made this...it was amazingly good.

Corn was on sale at Longos for 10 cents a cob (Ontario)

http://www.theravenouscouple.com/2009/0 ... -corn.html

[IMG]http://img837.imageshack.us/img837/4315/anhq.jpg[/IMG]
How long would you grill this for? I went to the blog but it didn't specify the time.


Thanks.
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gr8dlr wrote: Problem with Pizza on the grill is to get consistent high heat on the bottom and top. With a grill, I find there's just too much airspace to heatup when you open the grill to put in the pizza or when you check the pizza. You really need to create a heatsink relatively close to the top of the pizza to char that top.

I've been experimenting creating a "shelf" of firebricks above my pizza stone and it helps but I still need more time/work.

BTW I found a great source of education on CRAFTSY.com Peter Reinhart shows how to make dough. You have to create a login but there's a series of FREE lessons on there. I made the dough and it was very good and relatively easy...not no knead but not a lot of kneading...more stretch and folding.
That's a good idea, create a smaller area of heat above the pizza. I wonder if just covering it with something like a heavy baking/roasting pan would work?

I do that when I grill lobster.
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Dr Butcher wrote: It's a bit of an art to cook pizza on the grill. Get a decent pizza stone and practice. You will burn pizzas, it's part of the learning process. Wood ovens burn much hotter than 600°F and they cook well (albeit in 4 minutes or so). Try some dough recipes, keep it thin, don't pile on the toppings.
Use the Traeger. I usually run it on 180 for a bit to put smoke on it and then run it 275 until done. Takes longer , but the dough is crisp and the added flavour can't be beat.
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Dr Butcher wrote: It's a bit of an art to cook pizza on the grill. Get a decent pizza stone and practice. You will burn pizzas, it's part of the learning process. Wood ovens burn much hotter than 600°F and they cook well (albeit in 4 minutes or so). Try some dough recipes, keep it thin, don't pile on the toppings.
Well I've tried twice and gone from one extreme to another. The first time putting the stone fairly close to the coals. Got the temp up to 750, guessing you can probably add another 200 degrees at the stone (no heat deflector :facepalm: ) and got a great looking and tasting pizza on top, but completely burned on the bottom.

Second try got some fire bricks and basically prevented much of the heat from getting past that barrier. I have a second stone now, so I'll try using them both and separating them with some balled up tin foil, or turn a couple of bricks on their side and see how that works.

I've got everything I need for the authentic Neapolitan style. The 00 flour, the fior di latte etc etc. From my first run though, when I used bread flour, I think getting the temp as high as possible without burning the bottom will transform pretty much any dough into something great.

Anyways, should be able to take another shot this weekend.
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It takes awhile for those fire bricks to absorb the heat....I've always been impatient and first couple of pizzas take a long time because stones actually aren't hot enough [don't have one of those heat guns to test temp]. By the time I put on my fourth pizza it was better. So make sure you preheat those bricks well. BTW I've found using Parchment paper is the best way to not F-up transferring pizza from peel to stones.

Ever see the Little Black egg videos? It's on my todo list when /if I can find a cheap BBQ.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WtXTMufUMh0

Re. corn. I microwave corn with wet paper towel on it to more or less cook it. I then transfer corn to hot grill to char/carmelize/dry out the outer portion of corn. If you try to cook corn from raw, I find it takes a long time.
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mjl_toronto wrote: Link

Interesting...tempted to buy for $78.
I've used it for that last 2 years. it's pretty easy to keep it at 220-230f for smoking, and the food turns out awesome. The only problem is monitoring it all day when making pulled pork. I've since purchased a Bradley and the master forge has been collecting dust in the garage.
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I haven't gone crazy with specialty flours and such when I've grilled pizzas. I did 'em on my Napoleon at around 600°F in about 8 minutes. I have a couple of 15 inch square corderite stones I picked up from Amazon that do a great job. I haven't used my Traegers, the smoke from the grease burning off the gasser is enough for me.

Edit: wow, the stones are selling for double what I paid for mine.....

http://www.amazon.ca/Pizzacraft-PC0100- ... cordierite
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neutral wrote: I know it's been over a month, but how did it turn out? Mesquite is usually recommended for beef. I find hickory gives you good smoke flavor without being overpowering.
I ate it before taking pictures of it... But yes it turned out nice and smokey! I use mesquite because I like that extra smokiness.

I did 2 ducks since then!

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