Shopping Discussion

Post Thanksgiving Turkey Clearance Thread ...

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  • Oct 16th, 2020 9:21 pm
Deal Fanatic
Feb 4, 2010
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wiebecj wrote: utility-grade turkeys are basically the same as grade A except they tend to be missing parts (ie: drumstick, wing etc....). I've never noticed a difference in flavour or quality of the meat otherwise.
Just curious but why are turkey parts missing? Why the name utility grade? Never heard of this before.
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Mar 31, 2017
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hierophant wrote: Just curious but why are turkey parts missing? Why the name utility grade? Never heard of this before.
You never seen youtube videos of chickens being abused, as in stomped on? Or maybe the feather removal equipment mangled up the turkey corpse.
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Mar 19, 2010
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Ottawa
Good stuff OP! Thanks for sharing
With Fido Mobile!
Deal Fanatic
Feb 4, 2010
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badOne wrote: You never seen youtube videos of chickens being abused, as in stomped on? Or maybe the feather removal equipment mangled up the turkey corpse.
Ohhhhhh. I actually don't eat chicken/poultry for that reason especially not at restaurants. If I do buy chicken (or any meat) it's directly from a local farmer.
Deal Guru
Jun 29, 2010
10012 posts
4407 upvotes
Toronto
ThatGuyAgain wrote: I stand corrected, Wife picked it up earlier from RCSS and they are actually fresh young turkeys for $0.88/lb
better for your wife to pick up a fresh young turkey than to have a fresh young turkey trying to pick her up
Good, better, best. Never let it rest. 'Til your good is better and your better is best.
Deal Fanatic
Aug 15, 2015
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ShoNuff2 wrote: better for your wife to pick up a fresh young turkey than to have a fresh young turkey trying to pick her up
That would boost her self esteem, not necessarily a bad thing.
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Aug 15, 2015
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hierophant wrote: Ohhhhhh. I actually don't eat chicken/poultry for that reason especially not at restaurants. If I do buy chicken (or any meat) it's directly from a local farmer.
You think they would stop doing that because you don't eat poultry ?
They would get stomped in vain...
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Aug 15, 2015
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wiebecj wrote: utility-grade turkeys are basically the same as grade A except they tend to be missing parts (ie: drumstick, wing etc....). I've never noticed a difference in flavour or quality of the meat otherwise.
I agree. Fresh vs frozen though I can taste the difference. Fresh cook easier/faster as well.
Member
Mar 7, 2011
269 posts
312 upvotes
Calgary
Just checked Sobeys nolan hill and beacon hill Costco in Calgary, both sold out of fresh. Sobeys did have some frozen butter balls with the prices cut off the tags, but no sign indicating any sort of sale.
Deal Addict
Nov 12, 2006
2440 posts
1522 upvotes
London
hierophant wrote: Just curious but why are turkey parts missing? Why the name utility grade? Never heard of this before.
The processing is not perfect.
Mechanical devices, sharp knifes, mass production.
A portion come out the other side, not 100% intact.
The meat is no different though.

Utility definition:
2a : kept to provide a useful product or service rather than for show or as a pet // utility livestock // a utility dog
b : being of a usable but inferior grade // utility beef
3 : serving primarily for utility rather than beauty

It is hardly a new term.
Utility turkeys have been around a long time, but RFD just seems to be learning about them.

If someone is making turkey pot pie, for example, then why buy grade A?
Similar happens with other products, but as a side effect of our grocery store society most never see it.
A portion of eggs aren't "presentation quality" and they get used by industry.
A portion a fruit goes to juice.
Less perfect steaks maybe become hamburger.
On it goes.
Deal Addict
Nov 10, 2012
2652 posts
1922 upvotes
Calgary
We have had some utility turkeys that we found were fattier and the meat didn’t taste as good. But have also had some that were totally fine. I find the trick at Superstore is to look closely in the utility bin and there are almost always some Grade A turkeys being sold for the utility price. Best of both worlds.
Deal Addict
Sep 13, 2007
4633 posts
5831 upvotes
GTA
toprodcr wrote: Thanks for this post. I actually went out this morning to buy a fresh one to cook today as we were unable to do Thanksgiving over the weekend. I found fresh ones at Sobeys for .99lb. I know frozen will be cheaper soon and I will probably pick one up for the holidays or whatever as we all like turkey anyway. So I got a 10lb for $10
Don't expect frozen Grade A to drop below 99/lb. I always buy my Christmas turkey post Thanksgiving and once in 5 years I found .89/lb. Post Easter this year I scored a ButterBall Natural at Loblaws for .99/lb. Cooked it for this Thanksgiving and it was one of the best turkeys Ive ever had, on par with home brined. If you find one óf these marked down grab it! https://www.butterball.ca/products/seas ... h-giblets/
it's basically a home brine done for you--Ingredients: Turkey infused with water, Canola oil, Extra virgin olive oil, Sea salt, White pepper, Sage, Thyme, Rosemary, Savoury and raised without antibiotics
Last edited by Kfox on Oct 15th, 2019 9:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Banned
Jul 12, 2005
610 posts
417 upvotes
Fatsomoto8888 wrote: I don't know about anyone else but I think there is a big difference between fresh and frozen. Cooked 2 birds over the weekend and the fresh was definitely way better.
Try thawing it first. /s
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Deal Addict
Dec 6, 2004
1789 posts
1696 upvotes
NFN_NLN wrote: Try thawing it first. /s
Heh, kind of agree with you here. While fresh is certainly better, if you cook a turkey that hasn't properly thawed out it makes the meat pretty tough. That said, fresh is noticeably better over frozen, more tender.
Deal Addict
Dec 27, 2011
2420 posts
2078 upvotes
Vancouver
barto wrote: You might also want to make sure they're not utility-grade... we've noticed more of a difference between Utility vs. Grade A than we have between fresh and frozen, FWIW.
Strong Agree. The utility grade might as well be dog-feed grade.
Sr. Member
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May 10, 2008
943 posts
925 upvotes
Vancouver, BC
Karala wrote: I went out to few stores looking for deals, Freshco (not a good sale & all frozen), Save-On (no turkey at all), Safeway (no sale), Costco (no turkey) & RCSS (no turkey).

I wouldn't make a trip out just to find turkey, it must be very location specific.
Thanks Karala for checking out the stores. I didn't find any at the Richmond Costco and the ones left at my neighbourhood Safeway are the huge ones. Maybe we'll skip turkey this Thanksgiving... :'(
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Mar 31, 2017
6729 posts
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The problem with butterballs is that they expect you to cook it from frozen. A large 9lb bird could take 7 hours in the oven, wasting time and energy. I prefer dry-brining a frozen utility or Grade A and cooking it for under 3 hours instead. The results of a dry-brine is a moist tender turkey.
Jr. Member
Dec 25, 2015
193 posts
122 upvotes
Brighton, ON
The key to nice moist turkey, is 'don't stuff it'. stuffing just draws all the juice out of the meat. I learned this from a chef many years ago.
Since doing this, no more dry turkey meat. I still cook a dressing, but just don't stuff the bird.
Deal Addict
Jul 26, 2009
4249 posts
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willowberry wrote: The key to nice moist turkey, is 'don't stuff it'. stuffing just draws all the juice out of the meat. I learned this from a chef many years ago.
Since doing this, no more dry turkey meat. I still cook a dressing, but just don't stuff the bird.
You should 'stuff' it with things like quartered onion, apple, lemon, orange, thyme, sage, rosemary, salt, and pepper.

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