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[Princess Auto] 9 pc Manual Impact Driver Set - $11.99

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  • Jun 8th, 2021 6:23 pm
[OP]
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Oct 10, 2020
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[Princess Auto] 9 pc Manual Impact Driver Set - $11.99

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Member
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Nov 24, 2007
378 posts
306 upvotes
Ottawa, ON
This is one of those tools that you never would have thought about buying, especially if you already have an battery-powered impact driver. The difference is that the electric ones are great for driving screws, but less so for UNdriving a screw, particularly one that's seized.

Where I find this manual impact driver to be critical is when I'm doing brakes on a car - this allows you to remove the disc retention screw without stripping it, by applying the inward force from the blow at the same time as applying the twisting force. Once you use it, you get it.

At this price, it's a no-brainer for anyone that does their own automotive work as a hobby or to save money.

EDIT - I should qualify/correct my post - I was more discussing the merits of the tool rather than the specific unit. I just checked, mine is in a black case and branded "Pro Point"' PA may have changed suppliers or quality.
Last edited by orange260z on Jun 8th, 2021 6:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Jul 8, 2009
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orange260z wrote: This is one of those tools that you never would have thought about buying, especially if you already have an battery-powered impact driver. The difference is that the electric ones are great for driving screws, but less so for UNdriving a screw, particularly one that's seized.

Where I find this manual impact driver to be critical is when I'm doing brakes on a car - this allows you to remove the disc retention screw without stripping it, by applying the inward force from the blow at the same time as applying the twisting force. Once you use it, you get it.

At this price, it's a no-brainer for anyone that does their own automotive work as a hobby or to save money.
Thanks im going to grab one ive never thought i would need it but who knows.
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Mar 20, 2004
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Mississauga
orange260z wrote: This is one of those tools that you never would have thought about buying, especially if you already have an battery-powered impact driver. The difference is that the electric ones are great for driving screws, but less so for UNdriving a screw, particularly one that's seized.

Where I find this manual impact driver to be critical is when I'm doing brakes on a car - this allows you to remove the disc retention screw without stripping it, by applying the inward force from the blow at the same time as applying the twisting force. Once you use it, you get it.

At this price, it's a no-brainer for anyone that does their own automotive work as a hobby or to save money.
I made sure to add anti-seize on those screws once I took them out with a similar impact driver.
Every time when changing to winter tires, I loosen up the screws and if it is getting hard to, I reapply a bit of anti-seize.
Makes working on brakes later much easier.
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Aug 21, 2011
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Calgary
maybe little off topic, in dollarama, you can get these about 4 $
Deal Addict
Apr 28, 2004
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This particular unit is absolute garbage. If you need one, spend more and get a good one.

I bought this one a few weeks ago. The philips head broke mid way up the threads on the first strike. Luckily my father had an older one that worked perfectly to remove the screws when replacing rotors.

On the plus side, the return was easy.
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Jul 14, 2009
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GTA
Is this safe to use to remove stuck license plate screws on the trunk?
Member
Oct 19, 2008
206 posts
199 upvotes
Halifax, Nova Scotia
wing0 wrote: I made sure to add anti-seize on those screws once I took them out with a similar impact driver.
Every time when changing to winter tires, I loosen up the screws and if it is getting hard to, I reapply a bit of anti-seize.
Makes working on brakes later much easier.
Those screws are really only there to retain the rotors while the car is on the assembly line and no brakes are installed yet. Once you take them out, there is no real reason to ever put them back in.
Newbie
Feb 26, 2014
69 posts
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DARTMOUTH
Fate wrote: This particular unit is absolute garbage. If you need one, spend more and get a good one.

I bought this one a few weeks ago. The philips head broke mid way up the threads on the first strike. Luckily my father had an older one that worked perfectly to remove the screws when replacing rotors.

On the plus side, the return was easy.
Have to agree with you here. Bought this exact model a few weeks ago before doing a brake job (to remove the rotor screws without stripping them). Got the Philips bit set up, made sure the driver was set to "loosen", gave it a whack with a hammer, and broke off the top of the Philips bit (which got stuck in the rotor screw). Tried one of the other Philip's bits next, and although it didn't snap, it did get deformed and failed to remove the screw.

If anyone's wondering, best way to remove the rotor screws is to use a #3 Philips long-handled screwdriver, position it in the screw, and bang it repeatedly with a hammer to loosen it up. Then I just used my 20V DeWalt impact driver to remove the screw. Definitely use anti-seize when replacing the rotor screws!
Jr. Member
Nov 25, 2019
109 posts
116 upvotes
Hey guys, is the impact driver itself any good?

Is it just the bits that are garbo?

Can you use any other, more trustworthy bit from your toolbox in this unit?
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Oct 10, 2020
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Akizuki wrote: Is this safe to use to remove stuck license plate screws on the trunk?
Not recommended because of the relatively soft mental. As a last resort, try it after applying penetrating oil. Make sure the bit fit tightly.

Have you tried with a vise grip? Some suggestions from this thread ... https://www.reddit.com/r/MechanicAdvice ... te_screws/

applying the vise grip method

Jr. Member
Jul 3, 2017
142 posts
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scamsNschemes wrote: Hey guys, is the impact driver itself any good?

Is it just the bits that are garbo?

Can you use any other, more trustworthy bit from your toolbox in this unit?
I bought similar unit from Harbor Freight a few years back, just in case I needed to do rotor job on Acura/Honda. I broke or chipped three bits while trying to take out four screws. It did the job, but not of high quality, IMO. I would spend more and get better quality unit if you plan on doing frequent brake jobs. Next time, I am going to drill the screws out if I need to.
Last edited by vtec300 on Jun 7th, 2021 11:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Member
Jun 5, 2007
270 posts
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Shangri-La
Bought a Japan made one in the early seventies for my motorcycles still works great.
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Apr 28, 2004
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scamsNschemes wrote: Hey guys, is the impact driver itself any good?

Is it just the bits that are garbo?

Can you use any other, more trustworthy bit from your toolbox in this unit?
It uses 5/16 bits, which is an odd size to find replacements.
Member
Aug 13, 2003
446 posts
265 upvotes
Calgary
Fate wrote: It uses 5/16 bits, which is an odd size to find replacements.
I believe 5/16" hex shank bits are the standard for all manual impact drivers.
Deal Expert
Mar 23, 2004
29155 posts
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orange260z wrote: This is one of those tools that you never would have thought about buying, especially if you already have an battery-powered impact driver. The difference is that the electric ones are great for driving screws, but less so for UNdriving a screw, particularly one that's seized.

Where I find this manual impact driver to be critical is when I'm doing brakes on a car - this allows you to remove the disc retention screw without stripping it, by applying the inward force from the blow at the same time as applying the twisting force. Once you use it, you get it.

At this price, it's a no-brainer for anyone that does their own automotive work as a hobby or to save money.
I have one of these (not the same model but same type), I never really found it that useful TBH. Used it maybe 2x and bought it maybe 15 years ago lol. These days, having impact drivers, I'd never bother even for the retainer screws on brake rotors.
Deal Expert
Mar 23, 2004
29155 posts
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Redshft wrote: Those screws are really only there to retain the rotors while the car is on the assembly line and no brakes are installed yet. Once you take them out, there is no real reason to ever put them back in.
Some people will disagree, of course. I'd agree on cars that have wheel studs and use lugnuts; on "Euro cars" that have the opposite, you'll want to be using that screw, trust me. ;)

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