Real Estate

Property facing Go Train Tracks?

  • Last Updated:
  • Sep 3rd, 2020 10:00 pm
Member
Mar 2, 2017
418 posts
508 upvotes
Markham
I am assuming he means living at a T intersection, where you are at the top/middle of the T, for most people it's an issue because you constantly have headlights pointing right into your home and for the Chinese it's one of the worst feng shui.
Realtor, Investor, CPA
Member
Nov 26, 2012
278 posts
247 upvotes
Toronto
If you are okay living there, I think the financials are a wash. You will buy this property at a discount (vs similar property without the Go behind it) and you will end up selling at a discount. So in terms of appreciation, you will net the same. How quickly it sells depends on the price and whether the seller is realistic or not.

Personally, I would not be willing to live there.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Jun 12, 2007
15675 posts
4735 upvotes
London
toothpaste wrote: My partner and I are considering to purchase a property that is right next to the Go Train tracks. ,,,,
The line runs every 30 mins right now due to covid service cuts. Normally, trains are 15 min apart during rush hour so double what you see
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jan 14, 2007
3379 posts
618 upvotes
GTA
OP, would this be your "forever" home or just a stepping stone? If your forever home and you're comfortable with everything else except resale, I'd go for it. If however you only see yourself living here for ~5 years I'd steer clear. Personally I wouldn't consider purchasing a house with such close proximity to rail lines and it's clear many feel the same way.

Keep in mind schedules can and do change so it's entirely possible train traffic increases in the coming years (COVID-19 may cause the opposite to be true as well due to all of the WFH).

I grew up in a home right next to a rail line and you do very quickly get used to the noise, but any guests will be very aware. I recall that some freight trains would cause a mild vibration that would rattle the dishes in the cupboards (rare, but it did happen).
Member
Jan 27, 2018
299 posts
229 upvotes
RichmondCA wrote: I am assuming he means living at a T intersection, where you are at the top/middle of the T, for most people it's an issue because you constantly have headlights pointing right into your home and for the Chinese it's one of the worst feng shui.
You got it.... That's a T
Member
Jan 26, 2020
333 posts
69 upvotes
Canada
carztoronto wrote: You are only considering the noise but I would be more concerned with the diesel fumes. At one point it will be white noise and it will be more bearable, but you will still be breathing toxic fumes every day.
You are so correct. Diesel fumes are horrible. I live blocks from train tracks and when the wind is blowing in the right direction I can smell some of it. When I'm near it its unbreathable.

As for the noise I will never understand why they don't put a wall up beside some railway tracks near residential areas. It really muffles a lot of sound. So worth it and so seldom done. I don't mean a 6' little wooden fence. I mean a serious, tall wall. A TRUMP wall for railway noise. Then again they should do that for highways as well. I used to live in an area near a busy city street. One day I noticed they were constructing a wooden fence. I scoffed. Well that fence was surprisingly effective and relatively cheap to build. Walls/fences can be effective as long as they are placed close to the noise source, not at the reception point of the noise. Building a wall/fence around your property is much less effective. And a little more expensive for you!

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