Wheels and Tires

Purchase Tires and Rims at Dealership?

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  • Oct 20th, 2020 1:53 pm
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Jul 29, 2013
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Purchase Tires and Rims at Dealership?

Should I purchase winter tires and rims at the dealership when I purchase a new Highlander vehicle next month or look elsewhere?
Where have you been most successful getting the best deal?

Any experience in negotiating accessories would be appreciated.
19 replies
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Nov 7, 2016
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Buying them with a new vehicle can many times be the cheapest route. Price it out...
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Depends on the price, whether they're OEM (or if you were planning to buy steelies), etc. Sometimes they'll give you a great price on the wheels other times its overly expensive.
Newbie
Jan 28, 2020
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profile wrote: Should I purchase winter tires and rims at the dealership when I purchase a new Highlander vehicle next month or look elsewhere?
Where have you been most successful getting the best deal?

Any experience in negotiating accessories would be appreciated.
Just get a quote, if you need more help DM me
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Dec 23, 2003
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I went through this same point when I got my 2012 Camry back in Nov 2011. At the time, the car was redesigned and a few tire shops were not 100% sure of the bolt pattern for the steel rims. I ended up getting my tires and rims from them and overpaid for the purchase. In hindsight, I would have just bought the steel rims from them and got my tires from another place and saved myself about $200 on my tires. Keep in mind that although dealerships may match the price of the tire, they charge close to standard labour rates for the balancing and installation. As an example, you could be quoted by a reputable tire shop $150 for the tire and the install/balance/valve stem costs is $15 a tire. The dealership will charge you double this as their labour rate is much higher (just like how Canadian Tire charges crazy high prices for the install/balance as well).

My suggestion is to just negotiate hard with the service manager to see if they can give you a deal on the package. Just make sure you know what you are looking for so that they don't quote you for a Goodyear when you want a Michelin tire. Also, make sure you a hub centric or OEM type steel rim and not a multifit one. The latter will give you all sorts of vibrations and headaches and is not worth it. A good steel rim that is well cared for (excluding pothole damage) should give you at least 10 years of service. Notice that I suggested steel rims and not alloys for the following reasons:

- Steel rims are cheaper (about $60 a rim vs at least $250 for a decent alloy)
- Less prone to corrosion/pitting from salt and stones
- Keeps your brake components fully covered from road salt vs. an alloy rim that one can see their brake components between the spoke gaps. This helps with longer service life and fewer brake services (i.e. cleaning) or component replacement
- Purchasing a set of wheel covers to "pretty up the steelies" are relatively inexpensive and help to protect the steel rim.

From a fashion perspective, I am not sure how many people run steelies on their higher end vehicles (RX350, BMW, Benz, Acura, etc.)
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[OP]
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hightech wrote: I went through this same point when I got my 2012 Camry back in Nov 2011. At the time, the car was redesigned and a few tire shops were not 100% sure of the bolt pattern for the steel rims. I ended up getting my tires and rims from them and overpaid for the purchase. In hindsight, I would have just bought the steel rims from them and got my tires from another place and saved myself about $200 on my tires. Keep in mind that although dealerships may match the price of the tire, they charge close to standard labour rates for the balancing and installation. As an example, you could be quoted by a reputable tire shop $150 for the tire and the install/balance/valve stem costs is $15 a tire. The dealership will charge you double this as their labour rate is much higher (just like how Canadian Tire charges crazy high prices for the install/balance as well).

My suggestion is to just negotiate hard with the service manager to see if they can give you a deal on the package. Just make sure you know what you are looking for so that they don't quote you for a Goodyear when you want a Michelin tire. Also, make sure you a hub centric or OEM type steel rim and not a multifit one. The latter will give you all sorts of vibrations and headaches and is not worth it. A good steel rim that is well cared for (excluding pothole damage) should give you at least 10 years of service. Notice that I suggested steel rims and not alloys for the following reasons:

- Steel rims are cheaper (about $60 a rim vs at least $250 for a decent alloy)
- Less prone to corrosion/pitting from salt and stones
- Keeps your brake components fully covered from road salt vs. an alloy rim that one can see their brake components between the spoke gaps. This helps with longer service life and fewer brake services (i.e. cleaning) or component replacement
- Purchasing a set of wheel covers to "pretty up the steelies" are relatively inexpensive and help to protect the steel rim.

From a fashion perspective, I am not sure how many people run steelies on their higher end vehicles (RX350, BMW, Benz, Acura, etc.)
Wow! Everything I wanted to know.

Thank you for sharing your experience. Tires and rims are very complicated especially for the novice.

I asked a while ago on here about wheel covers and got shot down without much information.
I found this thread critical with no patience for the unknowledgeable.

I had wondered why drivers do not use wheel covers for their winter tires as it looks ugly. Most replies said that snow will get behind the cover and also they will not stay on long so I presume they are friction fitted and not bolted on.

Thanks again for educating me.
Why down votes for asking a question?
This is a hard crowd.
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@profile

Don't let it get to you. There are those who help out, and those who don't.

As for wheel covers coming out, you can always attach a couple long zip ties to secure the covers to the steel rim. I have not done this as if you have oem covers they are better built and fit more securely than the Costco, Walmart, Canadian Tire, etc. Aftermarket type.
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Deal Expert
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Who gives two shits about down votes.

My family, friends and I get our tires (wheels, parts, etc., even my Motul oil) from Billy at Tires23 in Mississauga since 2003.

I'm buying Bridgestone WS-90 next month.
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Purchasing at a stealer can sometimes be fine--sometimes they are well priced and you do have to consider they are usually selling you OEM [alloy] wheels which are typically a good bit more expensive than comparable aftermarket ones and sometimes much more expensive than cheap "reps". However I would stick to two things:
1. Their advertised or posted specials. You should still price-compare to other places but the advertised specials usually include OE wheels at clearance-type pricing, bringing packages down to the level of similar tyres with aftermarket wheels.

2. Try to stay away from combining the winter wheels/tyres "into the deal" for the car. You have no idea what they're not giving you in discount off the price of the car when you're adding a wheel/tyre package into the mix. They could easily "throw in" a set of winters that they're otherwise selling for $1000 to a walk-in customer, while you might have been able to get $2000 in discounts off the car price had you not brought the 2nd set into the mix. I'd say negotiate the best deal on the car and then go for those good deals at the advertised price; or if you're looking at a reg. price package try to bring them in afterwards but before the deal is finalised obviously to see if you can save some more money.

In the end, shop around, do you research, buy what you think is giving you the best value for the money you're paying. Pretty standard stuff. Oh also stay away, far away, from wheel locks. Don't pay extra for them, don't even let them "throw them in". Simply put don't get them on your vehicle. Wheel theft is pretty rare since it's not the 90s anymore; unless you live in an area where this kind of thing is a real problem, they are far more headache than they are worth. Plus even if you did live where wheel theft is a problem, pro thieves have all the tools they need to get these things off anyway.
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ES_Revenge all good advice.
Thanks for sharing.

I have had wheel locks that came with a vehicle.
As you said they were nothing but a PIA.
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Jan 2, 2019
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I plan to buy Michelin X-Ice Snow for the wife at CanadianTire. Probably the best place to buy tires.
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laziguy wrote: I plan to buy Michelin X-Ice Snow for the wife at CanadianTire. Probably the best place to buy tires.
Maybe when there are sales and only if you're just buying tires.

Would never let CT touch my car, even if it's just the wheels, unless you don't care about your car or your wife.
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[OP]
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ice
laziguy wrote: I plan to buy Michelin X-Ice Snow for the wife at CanadianTire. Probably the best place to buy tires.
What about the price at Costco?

I have had Michelin X-Ice for the last 10 years and have been very pleased with them.
Live in Ontario in the boonies and if the road (5 km. long) is icy we must use tire chains.
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Jan 2, 2019
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profile wrote: ice

What about the price at Costco?

I have had Michelin X-Ice for the last 10 years and have been very pleased with them.
Live in Ontario in the boonies and if the road (5 km. long) is icy we must use tire chains.
There's currently a sale going on at CanadianTire so it's going to be cheaper than Costco. A few months ago I purchased winter tires and had them installed at CanadianTire, I had no issues, so I plan on doing it again for wife's car.

And yeah, my cars are a few years old so I don't care if they scratch the rims. It's already scratched up anyways.
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Purchasing Tires and Rims from a Dealership is stupid and definitely a RIPOFF.

Plenty of other places to get rims and tires.
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