Computers & Electronics

Putting it to the test: Rogers Gigabit vs Bell 100Mbs

  • Last Updated:
  • Jun 7th, 2019 6:26 pm
[OP]
Newbie
Jun 2, 2019
2 posts
3 upvotes

Putting it to the test: Rogers Gigabit vs Bell 100Mbs

When I moved to downtown Toronto in October, I needed internet quickly. A Bell store down the street was the nearest around so instinctively went with them. They installed 50Mbps/10Mbps DSL. Along comes Rogers some time later with promises of higher speeds with their Ignite "gigabit" internet product. The price wasn't bad, so I signed up... without yet cancelling my Bell. Nothing seemed right. I was using my same wireless router, was getting great "speed tests" to local Toronto servers, but the internet in general just seemed very laggy. Something was going on.

So, being the compulsive nerd that I am sometimes, I decided to put it to the test. I put identical Raspberry Pis (with gigabit ethernet adapters) on each connection to run hourly speed tests. I realize there are some limitations here, but not that would affect the comparative results, particularly since the advantage here should have been for Rogers. I configured them to publish the results to a website I set up: www.rogersvsbell.com and then for that to put an hourly composite of the results on Twitter: @RogersVsBell Since I started this, and after I felt confident I'd be sticking with Bell over Rogers, I have upgraded my Bell connection to 100Mbps/10Mbps.

The results have been striking. On speed tests to local servers, Bell consistently maxes out the connection, but Rogers usually performs pretty well too. Rogers often hits the max capacity of the Pi setup, which is about 230Mbps or so (but not consistently). However, whenever the speed tests are conducted outside of Rogers' or Bell's network, the results become starkly different. Rogers, it appears, has much poorer connectivity to the outside world than Bell. So, even though my Rogers connection is advertised as 10x faster than my Bell connection, in reality, my Bell connection is producing consistently higher speeds all day long.

There are 5 tests conducted per hour to servers around the internet. Three metrics are judged: download speed, upload speed, and latency. They are conducted a few minutes apart in case of bottlenecks at the remote server. The "win" goes to the provider who gets the edge in two out of three. Over the entire course of this test, Bell has "won" 88.3% of the testing rounds. In only download speed tests, Bell has won 77.0% of the time, in upload tests 79.0% of the time, and in latency, 87.3% of the time. Bell is the very clear victor here - it really isn't even close.

Again, the results from when I started this project are all here: www.rogersvsbell.com - you can tell when I upgraded from the 50Mbps to 100Mbps on Bell based on the "Shortest Ping" speed test, which doubles the hour the technician made the change (although honestly, Rogers was lagging behind so much already, this barely made a difference in the results). I can't say, obviously, these results would be the same outside our stretch of Ontario (although I suspect they would), but for those figuring which to use strictly for internet, these tests might be helpful. This battle clearly goes to Bell. (I have read a lot on RedFlagDeals but this is my first time posting - so thanks to all for all the great info already on here.)
5 replies
Deal Addict
Jan 17, 2009
1344 posts
1123 upvotes
Toronto, Ontario
Rogers service quality depends heavily on your area. If you're in an area with new lines and not too much saturation you'll fly. If you're in an area with old lines and a lot of people using it you're going to be slower.

I went from Rogers 250/10 to Carrytell 100/10 (basically still rogers) to Bell 1000/750. I have had no stability issues on any of these and maxed out my connection any time of day. Rogers installer said the max speed i could get in my building was 400 down.

Bell is amazing because of the upload speeds and consistency, but Rogers was better for billing/support. Bell is an absolute nightmare to deal with and if if Rogers had better speeds i'd switch back in a heartbeat.

0 loyalty to Bell but they're the fastest for a good price so that's who i use.
[OP]
Newbie
Jun 2, 2019
2 posts
3 upvotes
The weird thing for me, at least, was that the connections locally were still really fast with Rogers. Directly connected to the modem on a true gigabit connection, I was getting past 700Mbps+ download /to their local servers/. It was only when I started running the speed tests outside the Rogers network - that's when the strength of their connectivity to the outside world came into the light. I could be getting 700Mbps to a downtown Toronto server with Rogers and 100Mbps to a downtown Toronto server with Bell, but connecting elsewhere in Canada and the US (or even more obviously, further away), Bell was winning the tests. Latency, however, was consistently better with Bell across the board and that may absolutely be related to my specific position in their network.

I don't have experience trying to cancel either yet - and I have to admit, the Rogers tech and their customer support were both actually really helpful, but that experience was pretty much the same with Bell - the techs were great and when I needed to upgrade my connection, I was able to get it installed in less than two days.
Sr. Member
Jan 22, 2017
960 posts
208 upvotes
it can be a number of things.
when my parents got ignite there was rf leakage and this caused the speeds to go from 1000mbps down to 25 mbps causing modem reboots.
second was isp dns sucks balls.
STEP INTO THE DARK SIDE...
Member
Dec 18, 2017
236 posts
25 upvotes
adrade wrote:
Jun 3rd, 2019 11:40 am
When I moved to downtown Toronto in October, I needed internet quickly. A Bell store down the street was the nearest around so instinctively went with them. They installed 50Mbps/10Mbps DSL. Along comes Rogers some time later with promises of higher speeds with their Ignite "gigabit" internet product. The price wasn't bad, so I signed up... without yet cancelling my Bell. Nothing seemed right. I was using my same wireless router, was getting great "speed tests" to local Toronto servers, but the internet in general just seemed very laggy. Something was going on.

So, being the compulsive nerd that I am sometimes, I decided to put it to the test. I put identical Raspberry Pis (with gigabit ethernet adapters) on each connection to run hourly speed tests. I realize there are some limitations here, but not that would affect the comparative results, particularly since the advantage here should have been for Rogers. I configured them to publish the results to a website I set up: www.rogersvsbell.com and then for that to put an hourly composite of the results on Twitter: @RogersVsBell Since I started this, and after I felt confident I'd be sticking with Bell over Rogers, I have upgraded my Bell connection to 100Mbps/10Mbps.

The results have been striking. On speed tests to local servers, Bell consistently maxes out the connection, but Rogers usually performs pretty well too. Rogers often hits the max capacity of the Pi setup, which is about 230Mbps or so (but not consistently). However, whenever the speed tests are conducted outside of Rogers' or Bell's network, the results become starkly different. Rogers, it appears, has much poorer connectivity to the outside world than Bell. So, even though my Rogers connection is advertised as 10x faster than my Bell connection, in reality, my Bell connection is producing consistently higher speeds all day long.

There are 5 tests conducted per hour to servers around the internet. Three metrics are judged: download speed, upload speed, and latency. They are conducted a few minutes apart in case of bottlenecks at the remote server. The "win" goes to the provider who gets the edge in two out of three. Over the entire course of this test, Bell has "won" 88.3% of the testing rounds. In only download speed tests, Bell has won 77.0% of the time, in upload tests 79.0% of the time, and in latency, 87.3% of the time. Bell is the very clear victor here - it really isn't even close.

Again, the results from when I started this project are all here: www.rogersvsbell.com - you can tell when I upgraded from the 50Mbps to 100Mbps on Bell based on the "Shortest Ping" speed test, which doubles the hour the technician made the change (although honestly, Rogers was lagging behind so much already, this barely made a difference in the results). I can't say, obviously, these results would be the same outside our stretch of Ontario (although I suspect they would), but for those figuring which to use strictly for internet, these tests might be helpful. This battle clearly goes to Bell. (I have read a lot on RedFlagDeals but this is my first time posting - so thanks to all for all the great info already on here.)
Is that Bell employs Fiber Optics channel (you always get same speed consistently) while Rogers is normal Cable Modem sharing (fluctuates time to time as not dedicated line like Fiber)??
Deal Addict
User avatar
Nov 12, 2011
4020 posts
388 upvotes
Niagara-on-the-Lake
smartnew wrote:
Jun 7th, 2019 4:28 pm
Is that Bell employs Fiber Optics channel (you always get same speed consistently) while Rogers is normal Cable Modem sharing (fluctuates time to time as not dedicated line like Fiber)??
Rogers now has FTTH, which I found to be very laggy. I live in a new development and Bell FTTH is much more stable than Rogers FTTH. Rogers sent a maintenance team out to fix an issue in the neighbourhood and it was still garbage.

Top