Fashion & Beauty

question regard to rain jacket

  • Last Updated:
  • Apr 24th, 2019 12:16 pm
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Deal Fanatic
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Jun 1, 2006
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nobodylulukkkk wrote: Is it worth it to spend much less to get the similar quality and features?
Is this a trick question?
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[OP]
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Nov 23, 2010
375 posts
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Montreal
No it's not, I saw some good brand on amazon like marmot and I have compared with big brand like HH or arcterx, I knew that big brand might have better features, however, the price is just too much for a poor student like me, I need a cheaper but decent deal, that is why I am asking in here to see if there is more option so I can do my research!
Sr. Member
Nov 16, 2006
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Somewhere between Mi…
If you are looking for a rain jacket you should consider spending a bit more and get something that is good for a heavy rain, not just a light rain. If you can afford it, stick with Arc'teryx or Patagonia but read some reviews and make sure it is suitable for you. Both Arc'teryx and Patagonia have reviews on their web sites. Get learned up on Gore-Tex, the difference between 2.5-layer and 3-layer, pros and cons of a hood, variations in warranty, etc. There are other makes that are good and a bit cheaper such as The North Face but each manufacturer will make unsuitable models for you so you have to spend some time reading reviews, not just a sentence or two on RFD. If you live near an outlet store you will find some discounts or maybe try The Last Hunt (read their return policy before ordering!) and grab something from last year's lineup.
Last edited by reddyflag on Apr 9th, 2019 10:35 am, edited 2 times in total.
Deal Fanatic
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Jan 27, 2014
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Why do you need to spend so much on a rain jacket? At least a winter jacket serves a major purpose in keeping you warm. Any regular rain jacket will keep you relatively dry.
Newbie
Dec 13, 2010
53 posts
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Calgary
I'd go with Columbia (and I did go with them). Great warranty service - I've used it, brand name without the crazy price tag and they have some good rain jackets.
Columbia Men's Watertight II Jacket is great.
Deal Fanatic
Aug 19, 2006
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Any rain jacket that is "breathable" is not a rain jacket after a sitting in a few hours of rain. If moisture can go one direction, it can go the other way. The more breathable it is, usually the quicker the rain will seep through.

It really depends on what kind of rain weather protection you're looking at. If you want to be absolutely rainproof, you're looking at something like a garbage bag... but then you'll probably sweat yourself wet inside.

Gear that uses goretex (such as Arcteryx) are usually pretty good at standing heavy rain for a certain period of time, but even they have a waterproof rating on how long they can sustain it. Other companies have their own versions of "rainproof" materials, but a lot of them I find inferior such as Marmot Nanopro. They may withstand rain for quite a while, but the durability of the material is quite poor.
Deal Guru
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Mar 14, 2005
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City of Vancouver
As a student on limited budget, an umbrella goes a long way. Besides, u can get the Arcteryx jacket and still get ur pants all wet.
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Newbie
Oct 18, 2009
81 posts
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Arcteryx is a good brand but its not absolutely necessary. IMO, you can get 90% of the quality/performance for much lower prices with other brands such as TNF, Marmot, MEC, Mountain Hardware, etc. In either case, you can find sales on all brands online (Arcteryx as well).
Are you expecting to walk in heavy rain for long durations and hikes?
Check the waterproof ratings on the jackets. Decent rain jackets will have a waterproof rating of 10,000 mm or greater.
Sr. Member
Aug 17, 2018
635 posts
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Uniqlo has a nice one, its my replacement to my throw around grab and go Geox rain one.

Otherwise I would rock a Zeta SL as it would satisfy most of your needs.
Deal Fanatic
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Oct 8, 2005
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Becks wrote: Besides, u can get the Arcteryx jacket and still get ur pants all wet.
It's the same with an umbrella??
Deal Addict
Oct 12, 2006
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Alberta
nobodylulukkkk wrote: No it's not, I saw some good brand on amazon like marmot and I have compared with big brand like HH or arcterx, I knew that big brand might have better features, however, the price is just too much for a poor student like me, I need a cheaper but decent deal, that is why I am asking in here to see if there is more option so I can do my research!
The marmot precip has been a well regarded budget option.
Deal Fanatic
Aug 29, 2006
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Check Eddie Bauer. If you end up not liking it, they will take it back.
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Deal Addict
Oct 4, 2006
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Toronto
Chingyul wrote: The marmot precip has been a well regarded budget option.
The Marmot Minimalist is also a decent option...with Gortex.
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Nov 1, 2006
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TruE SkiLLS wrote: Any rain jacket that is "breathable" is not a rain jacket after a sitting in a few hours of rain. If moisture can go one direction, it can go the other way. The more breathable it is, usually the quicker the rain will seep through.

It really depends on what kind of rain weather protection you're looking at. If you want to be absolutely rainproof, you're looking at something like a garbage bag... but then you'll probably sweat yourself wet inside.

Gear that uses goretex (such as Arcteryx) are usually pretty good at standing heavy rain for a certain period of time, but even they have a waterproof rating on how long they can sustain it. Other companies have their own versions of "rainproof" materials, but a lot of them I find inferior such as Marmot Nanopro. They may withstand rain for quite a while, but the durability of the material is quite poor.
I wonder if that's how it works. My understanding is this: breathable fabrics allow moisture in the form of a gas out while not allowing water in the form of a liquid in. Water vapour is considerably smaller than the micropores in a fabric like Goretex but water in the form of a liquid in much much larger and simply cannot go through the micro pores. The water vapour moves via diffusion and not by wicking or capillary action.

Many people will tell you that there Goretex no longer works and there is a reason for that. Dirt and other contaminents block the micropores and prevent diffusion. As a result, pleople get wet not from rain coming through but from their own sweat condensing inside the jacket.
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Aug 19, 2006
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Jimbobs wrote: I wonder if that's how it works. My understanding is this: breathable fabrics allow moisture in the form of a gas out while not allowing water in the form of a liquid in. Water vapour is considerably smaller than the micropores in a fabric like Goretex but water in the form of a liquid in much much larger and simply cannot go through the micro pores. The water vapour moves via diffusion and not by wicking or capillary action.

Many people will tell you that there Goretex no longer works and there is a reason for that. Dirt and other contaminents block the micropores and prevent diffusion. As a result, pleople get wet not from rain coming through but from their own sweat condensing inside the jacket.
Overall, breathable and rainproof shouldn't really be used in the same sentence. Google "goretex breathable humidity" and you'll get a lot of articles on how most rain-proof membranes work. (https://www.rei.com/learn/expert-advice ... works.html)

1) If you're looking for a rain jacket while commuting, then any sort of "waterproof" fabric would be good cause you're probably not in the rain long and you're not sweating anyways

2) If you want to keep yourself dry while it's pouring and you're doing a hike (or even on a warm day)... "breathable" rain jackets aren't going to work anyways because you need a difference in temperature for diffusion aka "fabric to breathe". If the outside and inside humidity are relatively similar, a breathable jacket isn't going do anything... you'll just sweat and get wet inside.

Then there's the first point I made, if moisture can go one way, it can go the other for the fabric. DWR would help, but once it wears down, you're still looking at just a fabric that will seep water through sooner or later.
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Nov 1, 2006
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TruE SkiLLS wrote: Overall, breathable and rainproof shouldn't really be used in the same sentence. Google "goretex breathable humidity" and you'll get a lot of articles on how most rain-proof membranes work. (https://www.rei.com/learn/expert-advice ... works.html)

1) If you're looking for a rain jacket while commuting, then any sort of "waterproof" fabric would be good cause you're probably not in the rain long and you're not sweating anyways

2) If you want to keep yourself dry while it's pouring and you're doing a hike (or even on a warm day)... "breathable" rain jackets aren't going to work anyways because you need a difference in temperature for diffusion aka "fabric to breathe". If the outside and inside humidity are relatively similar, a breathable jacket isn't going do anything... you'll just sweat and get wet inside.

Then there's the first point I made, if moisture can go one way, it can go the other for the fabric. DWR would help, but once it wears down, you're still looking at just a fabric that will seep water through sooner or later.
This is the point I rebutted: Goretex is designed to allow water vapour - a gas - out while blocking water - a liquid. You might find this helpful: https://www.explainthatstuff.com/goretex.html
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Aug 19, 2006
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Jimbobs wrote: This is the point I rebutted: Goretex is designed to allow water vapour - a gas - out while blocking water - a liquid. You might find this helpful: https://www.explainthatstuff.com/goretex.html
"Waterproof Testing

Any fabric is considered “waterproof” when it reaches a certain level of water resistance. Water resistance lab methods are standardized, using a water column or hydrostatic pressure test. Results are stated in millimeters (mm) or pounds per square inch (psi). Brands simply don’t agree on the result that makes a jacket fully waterproof."

Im not chirping on goretex being a bad material in keeping you dry, I have many pieces of goretex gear and I love them for certain things. But unless you've stood outside with these gear for long hours, then it's theory; we aren't talking about the same expectations when it comes to what "waterproof" means.

A very simple test. Leave your goretex under a shower head or tap... If the fabric starts to turn darker, the water is penetrating the layers. Do the same to rubber, it won't change colour cause water won't penetrate it.
Deal Fanatic
Nov 1, 2006
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Toronto
TruE SkiLLS wrote: "Waterproof Testing

Any fabric is considered “waterproof” when it reaches a certain level of water resistance. Water resistance lab methods are standardized, using a water column or hydrostatic pressure test. Results are stated in millimeters (mm) or pounds per square inch (psi). Brands simply don’t agree on the result that makes a jacket fully waterproof."

Im not chirping on goretex being a bad material in keeping you dry, I have many pieces of goretex gear and I love them for certain things. But unless you've stood outside with these gear for long hours, then it's theory; we aren't talking about the same expectations when it comes to what "waterproof" means.

A very simple test. Leave your goretex under a shower head or tap... If the fabric starts to turn darker, the water is penetrating the layers. Do the same to rubber, it won't change colour cause water won't penetrate it.
However, if you walk around in a rubber jacket on a rainy day, you will end up wetter than if you wear a Goretex jacket. Goretex is a multilayer fabric so water being absorbed by the outer layer does not mean that water penetrates the jacket.

Anyway we could discuss this for a long time and probably find that we fundamentally agree on the generalities if not the details.

My suggestion for anybody that needs a waterproof jacket for day to day use is to buy a Barbour or other waxed jacket. If you need a waterproof jacket for hiking etc., get a jacket made of Goretex.

Anyway
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Jul 7, 2003
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When looking at rain jackets I would consider looking for one that has a zipper under the arm pits when you can unzip when its humid. My Patagonia rain jacket has that and its a nice feature.

Some rain jackets for runners have vents in the back. The upper part overlaps the lower part and there is a mesh between them. I dont have one so I dont know how well they work, I've just seen them.
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