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Questions about tools

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  • May 18th, 2021 1:39 pm
[OP]
Newbie
Jun 25, 2019
98 posts
101 upvotes
Montreal

Questions about tools

Hello,

I’m looking for a set of power tools and saw this set on Amazon.

https://www.amazon.ca/gp/aw/d/B07WSXLX1 ... EEQB&psc=1

Does anyone have this specific brand/model or has heard about them?

If not do you have a suggestion or recommendation on what to look for in a good set.
26 replies
Deal Addict
Jun 26, 2019
1414 posts
1143 upvotes
GTA
Let's start with the first question: What do you intend to do with said tools?

Next up, these tools (based on the prices I see atm and no *************** history) seem to be pretty expensive for what you get.

If you're just looking to do some jobs around the house and they are going to be very light use, Ryobi is probably a better choice and will be much cheaper as well.

If they are going to be used a lot more, and you have higher demands of them, then maybe you can setup up to Dewalt or M12.

Edit: Apparently camelx3 gets censored?
Deal Guru
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Mar 23, 2008
12656 posts
9257 upvotes
Edmonton
besmirlikaj6 wrote: Hello,

I’m looking for a set of power tools and saw this set on Amazon.

https://www.amazon.ca/gp/aw/d/B07WSXLX1 ... EEQB&psc=1

Does anyone have this specific brand/model or has heard about them?

If not do you have a suggestion or recommendation on what to look for in a good set.
For that price, I'd just go for a name brand. The batteries LOOK like Dewalt 20v, but who knows if they're actually compatible. Plus what will you do for support after? At least Dewalt/Milwaukee/etc have brick and motor repair depots that you can go to. And $200 for a 2.0Ah battery is ridiculous. Dewalt is only $67.

C
Deal Expert
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Feb 11, 2007
17176 posts
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Oakville
besmirlikaj6 wrote: Hello,

I’m looking for a set of power tools and saw this set on Amazon.

https://www.amazon.ca/gp/aw/d/B07WSXLX1 ... EEQB&psc=1

Does anyone have this specific brand/model or has heard about them?

If not do you have a suggestion or recommendation on what to look for in a good set.
Yea, better to buy a Ryobi kit or individual tools for the uses you need. Most only need a drill. You'd need a sawsall if doing demo, or a saw if building something, but a mitre saw is often more useful.
I'd also recommend getting wired tools unless you really need them to be battery, like the saw, sawsall, etc.
If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.
Deal Expert
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Jun 12, 2007
16742 posts
5296 upvotes
London
besmirlikaj6 wrote: ,
If not do you have a suggestion or recommendation on what to look for in a good set.
Home Depot - ridgid = lifetime "service agreement" aka warranty includes the battery. Watch for the sales in hot deals
[OP]
Newbie
Jun 25, 2019
98 posts
101 upvotes
Montreal
So basically I have a condo, and I would like to fix it up a little before I sell it this year.

Also planning on buying a house in the near future. Not that I want to buy a crappy house but the type of house supply in my price range is pretty run down.

So what I’m trying to do is to buy a kit that will serve me for both projects. I have seen that buying those tools individually, you pay more than if you buy them in a bustle. But I may be mistaken.
[OP]
Newbie
Jun 25, 2019
98 posts
101 upvotes
Montreal
Interesting point of view, sorry I’m a nube. Why would you suggest wired. It feel like the battery powered one are more versatile?

Also are Roby good tools? Do you have some?
Deal Guru
Jan 25, 2007
10621 posts
5915 upvotes
Paris
JCB is a heavy equipment manufacturer who licenses tools from someone else, in this case I think Dewalt. When I worked for a more green heavy equipment manufacturer, we also had overpriced tools with our name on them someone else made. In general, they were there for die hard brand fans and as giveaways for us as corporate or for dealerships.

Now onto what you need… Milwaukee M12. I am probably in the top 10 of the folks on here for tool ownership, and the M12 stuff is what I reach for 99% of the time. I also have a few Ryobi pieces, though I gave away all the drills etc to my Dad and now only use Ryobi for specialized things, like their nail gun, my 18v remote truck, inflator, etc.

I also have Milwaukee 18v stuff, Ridgid 18v stuff, and sold off my Dewalt cordless. For 99% of what I do, its M12. Powerful, lite, easy to store away. Its really good stuff.
Deal Addict
Jun 26, 2019
1414 posts
1143 upvotes
GTA
besmirlikaj6 wrote: So basically I have a condo, and I would like to fix it up a little before I sell it this year.

Also planning on buying a house in the near future. Not that I want to buy a crappy house but the type of house supply in my price range is pretty run down.

So what I’m trying to do is to buy a kit that will serve me for both projects. I have seen that buying those tools individually, you pay more than if you buy them in a bustle. But I may be mistaken.
Again, what do you plan on doing? Are you going to be demoing stuff? Framing stuff? Fine woodworking? Plumbing, etc etc.

For most stuff in a condo, especially if you arent demoing much, a reciprocating saw and circular saw aren't going to do you much good. Buying a bunch of extra tools you are never going to use isn't going to save you much in the end.

I've purchased more tools than I care to admit to, and I don't think Ive ever bought a big 5 or more piece set of tools. You can usually find better deals on single stuff, and only getting 2 batteries is kinda a deal breaker (for me at least).

I think you need to figure out what you plan on doing and go from there. Buy tools that you know you're going to have a use for. Depending on what you're planning on doing in the condo, a brad nailer and mitre saw may be way better than those tools you linked.
besmirlikaj6 wrote: Interesting point of view, sorry I’m a nube. Why would you suggest wired. It feel like the battery powered one are more versatile?

Also are Roby good tools? Do you have some?
Corded tools will last forever, batteries will eventually die. Also they are cheaper. If you aren't going to be using the tool everyday for a living, pulling out a cord once a year becomes less of a big deal. Also, the batteries wont be dead everytime you go to use it.

Ryobi is probably perfectly fine for your uses. If you want to get something higher end and more compact, I would recommend M12. That said, refer to my point above, still not sure what tools you need to its harder to recommend a platform.
Newbie
May 12, 2021
85 posts
46 upvotes
Buy some Milwaukee M12 stuff on Kijiji/Marketplace. Tons of flippers there with brand new stuff. Did it myself but the market is saturated now.
[OP]
Newbie
Jun 25, 2019
98 posts
101 upvotes
Montreal
So basically, I’m planning to strip a hanging ceiling and putting it flat with the rest of the condo.

So I’m guessing I need:
1-Something to cut the gypse, and possibly some metal corners from the existing hanging ceiling.
2-Something to cut/adjust the new gypse sheets.
3-something to screw the new gypse sheets on the ceiling.
4-Something to cut wood 2/4 with in case I need to put some as support for the bee structure.
5-Something to sand the excess plaster.
[OP]
Newbie
Jun 25, 2019
98 posts
101 upvotes
Montreal
What is the difference between m12 and m18?
Deal Expert
User avatar
Feb 11, 2007
17176 posts
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Oakville
besmirlikaj6 wrote: Interesting point of view, sorry I’m a nube. Why would you suggest wired. It feel like the battery powered one are more versatile?

Also are Roby good tools? Do you have some?
I assume you're talking to me? It helps if you quote who you're replying to.
Wired is cheaper, no batteries to worry about, always works, more powerful for the price, batteries add weight, etc. Battery only has the advantage of convenience.
Jerico wrote: JCB is a heavy equipment manufacturer who licenses tools from someone else, in this case I think Dewalt. When I worked for a more green heavy equipment manufacturer, we also had overpriced tools with our name on them someone else made. In general, they were there for die hard brand fans and as giveaways for us as corporate or for dealerships.

Now onto what you need… Milwaukee M12. I am probably in the top 10 of the folks on here for tool ownership, and the M12 stuff is what I reach for 99% of the time. I also have a few Ryobi pieces, though I gave away all the drills etc to my Dad and now only use Ryobi for specialized things, like their nail gun, my 18v remote truck, inflator, etc.

I also have Milwaukee 18v stuff, Ridgid 18v stuff, and sold off my Dewalt cordless. For 99% of what I do, its M12. Powerful, lite, easy to store away. Its really good stuff.
+1 for the M12 tools. I use them the most as well. My ryobi tools are for backup or special uses, or the lend out to people.
If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.
Deal Guru
Jan 25, 2007
10621 posts
5915 upvotes
Paris
besmirlikaj6 wrote: What is the difference between m12 and m18?
12v vs 18v. The 18vs weigh a lot and have a lot more power than you need for what you are doing. Think driving a screw vs knocking a 1” hole in concrete.
Deal Guru
Jan 25, 2007
10621 posts
5915 upvotes
Paris
besmirlikaj6 wrote: So basically, I’m planning to strip a hanging ceiling and putting it flat with the rest of the condo.

So I’m guessing I need:
1-Something to cut the gypse, and possibly some metal corners from the existing hanging ceiling.
2-Something to cut/adjust the new gypse sheets.
3-something to screw the new gypse sheets on the ceiling.
4-Something to cut wood 2/4 with in case I need to put some as support for the bee structure.
5-Something to sand the excess plaster.
1&2 - a knife
3- a drill with drywall attachment or just free hand
4 - a handsaw
5 - a sanding block

1&2 and 4&5 are super cheap.
Deal Addict
Jun 26, 2019
1414 posts
1143 upvotes
GTA
besmirlikaj6 wrote: So I’m guessing I need:
1-Something to cut the gypse, and possibly some metal corners from the existing hanging ceiling.
2-Something to cut/adjust the new gypse sheets.
3-something to screw the new gypse sheets on the ceiling.
4-Something to cut wood 2/4 with in case I need to put some as support for the bee structure.
5-Something to sand the excess plaster.
1 - A utility knife, buy a good olfa one on sale, spend dat $7. Might want some snips, but could make do without.
2 - Same as 1. I would probably recommend buying a straight edge of some sorts. Could buy an empire drywall T square for $20.
3 - Any drill or driver will do. A driver is probably better. You probably don't need to invest in a drywall screw gun.
4 - Trying to figure out whata bee structure is.... but its late.... anyways, yeah, any saw will do. Seeing as you're only cutting one, just buy a handsaw or get them to cut it when you buy it.
5 - A sanding sponge or block will do the trick. That said, if you aren't that good at mudding, you probably want to buy sanding kit you can attach to your vac for like $40 or 50.

Also, if you're going to buy dyrwall knives, spend a bit extra and get good ones, as opposed to ones that will in the trash after a few uses. The good ones are like $20, so not like you're out much money and will save in the long run. Also, should probably pick up a mixer/paddle for the compound.

For drywalling ceilings I usually thin down the mud and smear it on with a roller. Then again it depends on what finish you're going for.
Deal Fanatic
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Oct 12, 2007
5986 posts
3540 upvotes
Ottawa
OP: You're getting good advice here. I will add to the above comments regarding wired vs battery that battery-powered tools are amazing when power outlets are nearby or when you're running a job site with multiple tools running simultaneously - cords can be a tripping hazard. Tool manufacturers are investing more and more of their design resources in battery-powered tools because that's where the market is right now so you can get some battery-powered tools these days that are as good or maybe even better than wired counterparts. Still, if you're working alone and mostly indoors, you do not "need" battery powered tools and you will find that they are bulkier, heavier, and more expensive than the same brand's similarly spec'ed wired counterpart. And with wired you can get the tools you want from whatever brand you want - you are not stuck in one manufacturer's ecosystem.

If I was to start over, I would strongly consider Milwaukee's M18 ecosystem. I am too old to change at this point and I have a pretty decent collection of Makita battery powered tools but I have also have wired tools by Bosch, Ridgid, Fein, Dremel, DeWalt, Ryobi, Craftsman, Porter-Cable and a bunch of others. The only wired tool that I have that I wished I also had a battery-powered one is a recip saw and that's because I live on a large property and running extension cords is inconvenient.

Good luck with your projects.
Deal Addict
Nov 12, 2006
2174 posts
1182 upvotes
London
SubjectivelyObjective wrote: Let's start with the first question: What do you intend to do with said tools?

Next up, these tools (based on the prices I see atm and no *************** history) seem to be pretty expensive for what you get.

If you're just looking to do some jobs around the house and they are going to be very light use, Ryobi is probably a better choice and will be much cheaper as well.

If they are going to be used a lot more, and you have higher demands of them, then maybe you can setup up to Dewalt or M12.
I agree with this.
I'd go with one of the 3 mainstream ones mentioned by several, and NOT the one from Amazon.
OP has answered the use later, and that doesn't change anything.

Father's day is coming up.
Typically (without the Covid variable), lots of tool deals come up in advance of that.

OP:
The things you mention, the phrasing you use, and your own admission of "nube" suggests you lack experience/skill in the areas you refer to.
Everybody starts somewhere, so I can't be too critical of that.
I do get the sense you are of the impression that the tools are going to reflect the finished product, but much more is going to be you.

It's the old saying that the camera doesn't make the photographer.
Or, the brush doesn't make the artist.
Deal Addict
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Feb 25, 2004
1088 posts
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Longueuil
I don't use my tools every day, I simply buy most of them from kijiji. If you don't need it anymore after the project, you can sell them for about the same price you paid (think of it as a free rental).

I always go for corded because there won't be any issue with a dead battery. I don't use them that often and when I need them, I don't want to deal with a battery and wait for it to be charged or replaced. Since I don't use them very often, my tools last for a very long time while batteries degrade even if you don't use them. I totally see the benefits of batteries for people that use them often but it is not my case.
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