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raising air conditioning unit off the ground in Brampton .

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  • Apr 7th, 2021 9:54 pm
[OP]
Newbie
Jan 2, 2014
27 posts
5 upvotes
Toronto

raising air conditioning unit off the ground in Brampton .

called a couple HVAC people and the prices ranged to lift the air conditioner unit 18 inches off ground on a pair of steel brackets seemed high 500-700$ .

has anyone done this is it possible to diy ?
26 replies
Deal Addict
Oct 20, 2011
1127 posts
416 upvotes
Mississauga
If there is enough slack in the Freon lines, (copper lines) as well as the electrical conduit/cable, than yes it's a diyer job. As long as there is still slack in the lines/cable once raised. If for what ever reason either/or lines/cable have to be disconnected/extended (most likely scenario), than if you're asking the question, I would say NO, it's not a diy job! Freon is under pressure and somewhat dangerous to work with only if you're not experienced with it and electrical at a higher voltage, more importantly amperage, well............enough said.
Last edited by MyDream1 on Apr 1st, 2021 11:03 am, edited 1 time in total.
Sr. Member
Jun 1, 2010
738 posts
215 upvotes
usernameinvaild wrote: called a couple HVAC people and the prices ranged to lift the air conditioner unit 18 inches off ground on a pair of steel brackets seemed high 500-700$ .

has anyone done this is it possible to diy ?
You will have to pump the freon down to the compressor, disconnect high voltage. remove the unit and weld line, vacuum, recharge test. I would not recommend doing this yourself.
See our 2021 RFD Trane AC Group Buy
group-buy-gta-ottawa-2021-central-ac-gr ... e-2449494/
Deal Guru
Jan 25, 2007
10375 posts
5593 upvotes
Paris
$500 seems very reasonable to me.
Banned
Aug 25, 2020
320 posts
240 upvotes
Hijacking this thread a bit...I'll be replacing my A/C in probably 2-4 years (monitoring it, it's reaching end of life...I'd replace sooner if some kind of green energy incentive came into play), I assume the cost of this is significantly lower of the HVAC company is replacing the A/C anyways since most of the steps mentioned (below) are being done anyways?
fourseasoncomfort wrote: You will have to pump the freon down to the compressor, disconnect high voltage. remove the unit and weld line, vacuum, recharge test. I would not recommend doing this yourself.
Deal Addict
Jun 16, 2009
2871 posts
1245 upvotes
Woodbridge
That is the correct assumption. Moving AC actually takes longer sometimes than installing a new one as the technician has to reclaim the gas first which is not required in new AC.
Also since freon ( R22) has skyrocketed since its complete ban in 2020, it makes job even more expensive.
When you buy a new AC, make sure you steer clear of cheap copper coils. Until, I started mentioning many previous buyers even didn't know about it ( IMO buyer should make a informed decision and it should not be left at the installer mercy )
threeSwansinCostco wrote: Hijacking this thread a bit...I'll be replacing my A/C in probably 2-4 years (monitoring it, it's reaching end of life...I'd replace sooner if some kind of green energy incentive came into play), I assume the cost of this is significantly lower of the HVAC company is replacing the A/C anyways since most of the steps mentioned (below) are being done anyways?
HVAC Professional. Committed to customer, not brand.
Furnace & Central AC Group Buy 2021
Banned
Aug 25, 2020
320 posts
240 upvotes
newlyborn wrote: That is the correct assumption. Moving AC actually takes longer sometimes than installing a new one as the technician has to reclaim the gas first which is not required in new AC.
Also since freon ( R22) has skyrocketed since its complete ban in 2020, it makes job even more expensive.
When you buy a new AC, make sure you steer clear of cheap copper coils. Until, I started mentioning many previous buyers even didn't know about it ( IMO buyer should make a informed decision and it should not be left at the installer mercy )
Thanks! This is all super helpful advice. Thank you very much! Any specific suggestions for good units, for 2500 - 3000 square feet? (I don't actually know the exact square footage, mostly because some recent renos....so a range is all I can offer!)
Deal Addict
Jun 16, 2009
2871 posts
1245 upvotes
Woodbridge
Carrier, Lennox, American Standard and alike all are reputable brands. However, it has been stressed enough by different posters that right installation is the key.
Depending upon several other factors ( like windows and its condition ), 2.5 ton will be more or less a great unit. Please find out the size of your home excluding the basement for correctly sizing the AC. Also make sure what ever tonnage you chose, your furnace should be able to support it as its the blower of furnace that works as engine . Without proper air flow, your AC will never work properly. I will also suggest you to steer clear of 13 SEER AC's no matter what anyone claims. They are the cheapest for a reason.
threeSwansinCostco wrote: Thanks! This is all super helpful advice. Thank you very much! Any specific suggestions for good units, for 2500 - 3000 square feet? (I don't actually know the exact square footage, mostly because some recent renos....so a range is all I can offer!)
HVAC Professional. Committed to customer, not brand.
Furnace & Central AC Group Buy 2021
Banned
Aug 25, 2020
320 posts
240 upvotes
newlyborn wrote: Carrier, Lennox, American Standard and alike all are reputable brands. However, it has been stressed enough by different posters that right installation is the key.
Depending upon several other factors ( like windows and its condition ), 2.5 ton will be more or less a great unit. Please find out the size of your home excluding the basement for correctly sizing the AC. Also make sure what ever tonnage you chose, your furnace should be able to support it as its the blower of furnace that works as engine . Without proper air flow, your AC will never work properly. I will also suggest you to steer clear of 13 SEER AC's no matter what anyone claims. They are the cheapest for a reason.
Amazing. Thank you so much for this!!
Didn't know this existed. I'll check it out! Thanks!
[OP]
Newbie
Jan 2, 2014
27 posts
5 upvotes
Toronto
doing stamped concrete in that area and it's either we remove and reinstall after the concrete work is done . or raise it if we have enough slack that is mentioned
Deal Addict
Jun 16, 2009
2871 posts
1245 upvotes
Woodbridge
The practical will be to have the AC disconnected now and reinstall once your concrete work is done.
usernameinvaild wrote: doing stamped concrete in that area and it's either we remove and reinstall after the concrete work is done . or raise it if we have enough slack that is mentioned
HVAC Professional. Committed to customer, not brand.
Furnace & Central AC Group Buy 2021
Deal Addict
Apr 18, 2005
2699 posts
1084 upvotes
Mississauga
newlyborn wrote: Carrier, Lennox, American Standard and alike all are reputable brands. However, it has been stressed enough by different posters that right installation is the key.
Depending upon several other factors ( like windows and its condition ), 2.5 ton will be more or less a great unit. Please find out the size of your home excluding the basement for correctly sizing the AC. Also make sure what ever tonnage you chose, your furnace should be able to support it as its the blower of furnace that works as engine . Without proper air flow, your AC will never work properly. I will also suggest you to steer clear of 13 SEER AC's no matter what anyone claims. They are the cheapest for a reason.
I thought Craig installs 13seer units as part of the group buy thread... coupled with our 4month cooling season why spend on higher SEER..
Deal Addict
Dec 19, 2009
4251 posts
2152 upvotes
TLSRULZ wrote: I thought Craig installs 13seer units as part of the group buy thread... coupled with our 4month cooling season why spend on higher SEER..
To use less electricity which will save the planet.
Deal Addict
Nov 16, 2011
1339 posts
1036 upvotes
HAMILTON
to kinda go with this, why are some installed on brackets on the wall and others put on the ground ( usually on a sidewalk slab/patio stone ). Ours is on slab and so is our other home.
See most new homes on brackets on wall.

Just curious..... Thanks
Sr. Member
Jun 1, 2010
738 posts
215 upvotes
luckystrike1 wrote: to kinda go with this, why are some installed on brackets on the wall and others put on the ground ( usually on a sidewalk slab/patio stone ). Ours is on slab and so is our other home.
See most new homes on brackets on wall.

Just curious..... Thanks
New construction AC units are installed on wall brackets because the ground around the home has recently been back filled and is unstable. When the frost comes out of the ground in the spring the AC and Pad will shift. In homes that are 3 years or newer and grading permits we install a antivibration pad as the ground is settled and the chance of shifting is minimal. When we replace a AC that is mounted on brackets we usually recommend mounting it on a antivibration pad that is off the home.
See our 2021 RFD Trane AC Group Buy
group-buy-gta-ottawa-2021-central-ac-gr ... e-2449494/
Deal Addict
Nov 16, 2011
1339 posts
1036 upvotes
HAMILTON
Thanks very much for the clear and concise answer. That perfectly answers my question. Thanks again
Sr. Member
Oct 19, 2020
694 posts
432 upvotes
GTA
Contrary to what one poster here suggested, SEER rating has no bearing on the quality and noise level of the unit until you get super high end 17++ for which there are no low budget options.

Both low budget and mainstream line units are available in the 13-16 seer range.
The main differences are in cabinet quality, noise level, and protection from loss of charge or fan motor failure. (the better ones shut themselves off to prevent compressor damage)

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